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Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century Research Paper


Introduction: Cyberbullying as a Disease of the 21st Century

An advance of technology leads to a widespread of cybercrimes throughout the network. Thus, personal abuses, frauds, and discriminations are often revealed through social media and blogging. The problem takes its roots to form the speedy development of telecommunication services, which provides a variety of opportunities for swindlers. A wide range of Internet services allows people to commit crimes without being recognized. Thus, cybercrime can be called a disease of the century, since it infects people with a desire to make a profit on the online deceits.

Definition of Cybercrime

Several modern scientists have been trying to outline the most consistent definitions of cybercrime. According to Majid Yar (2013), cybercrime presents “computer-mediated activities which are either illegal or considered illicit by certain parties and which can be conducted through global electronic networks” (p. 9). Therefore, cybercrime encompasses a variety of acts that bring some damage and offense to society.

Cybercrime and Society

The Dual Nature of Cybercrime

Computer-mediated crimes are often treated in two different ways. Thus, the illegal activities that are conducted through networking can be viewed either as actual crimes or as deviances. While the former present acts that are prohibited by legal laws, the latter ones are usually perceived as undesirable actions that violate the rules of social behavior (Yar, 2013).

Virtual Losses: Quantification

The global society faces great losses in connection with the development of cybercrime. The biggest problem of this issue is that it is practically impossible to estimate the size of the virtual crime. Due to the huge scope of networking space, it is quite challenging to detect the sources of cybercrimes. Thus, virtual losses defy quantification, which is gradually turning into a global social problem of the digital age.

Typology of Cybercrimes

The computer-based crimes can be subdivided into a huge number of categories, while the nature of illegal activities that are accomplished through networking is extremely diverse. Due to Sarah Gordon and Richard Ford (2006), who researched cyberbullying, one can differentiate two distinct categories of virtual crimes. The scientists named these categories Type I Cybercrime and Type II Cybercrime. While the first type is a purely mechanistic character, the second one has a humanistic nature. In other words, Type I illustrates the examples of illegal acts that are not directed upon any specific person and have technological features. In contrast to it, the second type presents a set of crimes that are created by humans to abuse or defraud someone.

Each category of cybercrime types can embrace a variety of specific acts. In their book, Grabovski and Smith (2009) provide an elaborate classification of virtual crimes. According to it, there are 9 types of cybercrime: communications that support criminal conspiracies, communication services theft, telecommunication piracy, the propaganda of offensive materials, money laundering, virtual terrorism and vandalism, fraudulent sales, interception of private communications and fund transfer crimes (Grabovski & Smith, 2009).

Conclusion: Virtual Cybercrimes as a Real Danger for a Global Society

Thus, one can deduce that the revolution of information technology produced a powerful wave of online frauds, which damages the safety and well-being of modern society. People throughout the world lose their property and become abused without having a chance to detect their offenders. The matter of internet perversion becomes more prominent with the speedy development of social networks that promote cyberbullying. Consequently, it is a primary task for the society to improve the ways of processing internet data so that to preserve it from being intercepted as well as elaborate the functioning of social media to protect its users from internet abuses.

References

Gordon, S., & Ford, R. (2008). On the definition and classification of cybercrime. Journal in Computer Virology, 2(1), 13-20.

Grabovski, P., & Smith, R. (2009). Crime in the digital age: Controlling telecommunications and cyberspace illegalities. New Jersey: Transaction Publishers.

Yar, M. (2013). Cybercrime and society. New York: Sage Publications.

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IvyPanda. (2020, August 12). Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/cyberbullying-and-cybercrimes-in-the-21st-century/

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"Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century." IvyPanda, 12 Aug. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/cyberbullying-and-cybercrimes-in-the-21st-century/.

1. IvyPanda. "Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century." August 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cyberbullying-and-cybercrimes-in-the-21st-century/.


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IvyPanda. "Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century." August 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cyberbullying-and-cybercrimes-in-the-21st-century/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century." August 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cyberbullying-and-cybercrimes-in-the-21st-century/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Cyberbullying and Cybercrimes in the 21st Century'. 12 August.

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