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Are Packaged Foods Fat-Free Products? Coursework

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Updated: Mar 30th, 2022

Introduction

Packaged foods have always had their place in American population as well as others around the world. This has been mainly because of the supposed low fat content. Customers rush for products that would give them the best of opportunities in life. In fact, they consider low fat content as the best foods to go for, given the high levels of fat related diseases. The levels of calories in these fats are usually understated, especially when the companies use their formula. Most, if not all, food-manufacturing companies label their products as having less than 3% of fats. This has been the trend in all packaged foods, to improve on their product sales. For instance, as is commonly seen in adverts, industries label their packaged foods as 97% fat free. To a common citizen who does not know or even understand this calculation; this is a good deal as opposed to the naturally known fat free foods. This paper will therefore explore the two formulas utilized in calculating fat content (Neuman, 2011, p.1).

Method

Manufacturing companies usually utilize other methods that make their products too good to be true. For instance, most packaged foods are labeled as having between 1-3% of calories, which in real sense is usually untrue if the following method of calculation is followed. In their calculations, they assume that each ounce contains 29 grams so that 10-ounce fat would give 290 grams (Benner, 2011, p. 1). Supposing that a 10-ounce food contains 240 calories and 9 grams of fat, in their calculation therefore, it becomes:

Formula

This method is quite misleading, given the fact that they use grams in their calculations. Instead, they should use calories as shown below. Since each gram contains 9 calories, then they should convert it first before calculating. The same should also apply to calculations for protein foods (Etta, 1994, p. 6). This would give, for the first instance:

Formula

This is quite interesting, given the rate usually given in adverts. Taking other examples from breakfast, lunch and dinner of packaged foods, we shall have the following.

Breakfast

Let us take an example of Rainsin-etts, which has the following nutritional contents: 2-ounce = 57 grams, it has 230 calories, and the calories from fat are 90. The total fat is 10 grams, with a protein content of 3 grams. The industries formula will give:

Formula Formula

However, when calories are used to calculate, we have:

Formula Formula

Lunch

In the second phase, let us take a cream of mushroom. 120ml contains 4.3-ounce, which makes about 122 grams. It has 100 calories, 50 of which, from fat. Total fat is 6 grams, with protein of 1 gram. The industries formula will give:

Formula Formula

However, when calories are used to calculate, we have:

Formula Formula

Dinner

In the third phase, let us take a pink salmon. 60ml contains 2.2-ounce, which makes about 63 grams. It has 90 calories, half of which comes from fat. Total fat is 5 grams, with protein of 12 grams.

Formula Formula

However, when calories are used to calculate, we have:

Formula Formula

Conclusion

Almost all food-manufacturing companies label their products as having less than 3% of fats. This has been the trend in all packaged foods to improve on their product sales. This has been attributed to the formula they apply in calculating fat content. From the calculations above, it is quite essential to note that figures and percentages given by food-processing companies are inaccurate and require further review. This would reflect the correct values and spur further research to lower them and hence reduce calorie levels in packaged foods (Bluman, 2005, p. 24).

Reference List

Benner, L. (2011). 21 Healthiest Packaged Foods. Abc NEWS/Health. Web.

Bluman, A. G. (2005). Mathematics in our world (1st ed.) Ashford University Custom. United States: McGraw-Hill.

Etta, S. (1994). Using food labels to follow the dietary guidelines for Americans: a reference. Agriculture Information Bulletin. Web.

Neuman, W. (2011). Food Makers Devise Own Label Plan. New York Times. Web.

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