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Gift Culture and Corruption in the World Essay


Introduction

The International Debate Education Association (IDEA) indicates that corruption is something that cannot be applied to traditional communities (Yeganeh, 2014). In communities where gift culture is embraced, etiquettes and civil responsibilities tend to have different meanings. The association goes further to indicate that many traditions and social structures are based on the exchange of services for rewards. This argumentative essay gives a critical analysis of gift culture and corruption.

Refuting the Claim

The presented claim is refutable because corruption cannot be described or analyzed as a Western concept. Personally, I do not agree with any part of the presented claim. To begin with, corruption emerges from the concepts of morality and ethics (Yeganeh, 2014). Corruption is something that has existed in different corners of the world for centuries. That being the case, the malpractice is applicable to each and every society and has a negative meaning.

Etiquette and civil responsibility are unique elements defined by ethical values. In traditional societies that embrace gift culture, etiquette and civil responsibility do not have different meanings (Health, Richards, & de Graaf, 2016). This analysis shows conclusively that every society expects its members to act in an ethical manner. The argument that societies that have a gift culture tend to define etiquette and civil responsibility differently is a fallacy.

The other part of the presented claim indicates that the political structures and social traditions of many nations are based on the exchange of services for gifts or rewards. Consequently, such political systems might not be able to survive if this beneficial exchange is embraced. The main argument in this kind of claim is that corruption is a critical attribute of many societies that embrace the gift culture practice (Health et al., 2016). This is a clear indication that gift-giving, corruption, and the provision of rewards are cultural issues that can only be described using ethical theories. The presented parts of the claim are refutable because corruption and gift-giving are malpractices usually embraced by individuals in superior positions.

Analysis of the Readings

According to the class readings, corruption is malpractice arising from cultural tradition. This is the case because many traditional societies appreciate the use of gifts and rewards. These practices are usually unavoidable, especially in the developing world. The readings explain why different countries with unique political traditions will eventually find it hard to survive with the beneficial exchange of services for rewards (Yeganeh, 2014).

The readings go further to present counterarguments to the claim. For instance, the materials indicate that corruption is unethical and should never be treated as a cultural or western concept. This is the case because it has become common in countries associated with rapid economic developments and political transformations (Health et al., 2016). Countries associated with crises, political changes, and rapid economic growth will have increased cases of corruption.

Unscrupulous officials might also use gift-giving traditions to take advantage of their citizens in the name of tradition. These individuals tend to have discretional authority in their respective nations. They end up making rational decisions to bribe in order to secure contracts and misappropriate resources (Yeganeh, 2014). Such officials will use the excuse to explain how and why gift-giving is an unavoidable practice in their respective social structures. Consequently, the individuals will engage in corrupt dealings in an attempt to enrich themselves. This knowledge shows clearly that poverty and culture have nothing to do with the vice. The efforts aimed at tackling corruption should therefore focus on values such as integrity and service for all.

References

Health, A., Richards, L., & de Graaf, N. (2016). Explaining Corruption in the Developed World: The Potential of Sociological Approaches. Annual Review of Sociology, 42(1), 51-79. Web.

Yeganeh, H. (2014). Culture and corruption: A concurrent application of Hofstede’s, Schwartz’s and Inglehart’s frameworks. International Journal of Development Issues, 13 (1), 2-24. Web.

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IvyPanda. (2020, November 12). Gift Culture and Corruption in the World. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/gift-culture-and-corruption-in-the-world/

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"Gift Culture and Corruption in the World." IvyPanda, 12 Nov. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/gift-culture-and-corruption-in-the-world/.

1. IvyPanda. "Gift Culture and Corruption in the World." November 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/gift-culture-and-corruption-in-the-world/.


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IvyPanda. "Gift Culture and Corruption in the World." November 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/gift-culture-and-corruption-in-the-world/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Gift Culture and Corruption in the World." November 12, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/gift-culture-and-corruption-in-the-world/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Gift Culture and Corruption in the World'. 12 November.

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