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How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness Report


Abstract

Inattentional blindness comes up as a result of an individual’s mindfulness or mental depletion. Mindfulness and mental depletion are affected by the changes that happen in the scene. Mindfulness and mental depletion also affect inattentional blindness in the cases of repetition of the scene and the perceptions held by the individual.

Moreover, memory makes an individual become more attentive as opposed to being inattentive when they remember scenes they have seen before. Human beings are also limited to a certain measure of mindfulness where they can only take note of a limited number of events at a particular time. Mindfulness is the interaction between the internal and external environment of an individual.

Introduction

People visualize many things and what they see is dependent on the attention they give it. In some instances, people have failed to recognize an event or an object in a scene yet it is obviously visible. The situation has been given the name Inattentional blindness. Inattentional blindness is defined as a situation where an individual is unable to visualize some of the features in a visual scene because they have not paid attention to them (Simons & Chabris1999, p. 1070).

Chiesa et al (2011, p. 449) states that, mindfulness is a state of mind where an individual is aware of the immediate environment both inside and outside. This report explains how mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness.

Methodology

The research is based on secondary information from the journals, books and other secondary sources. The topic has been researched in depth and several scholars have been able to conduct experiments and document their findings.

  1. Findings/ results.
  2. How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness.
  3. Changing scene.

Simons & Chabris (1999, p. 1070) argue that inattentive blindness occurs frequently in an individual when visual scenes are dynamic. Although people may be involved in an attentive situation, they may even fail to see a scene because they lack attention. In other cases, events may be outstanding yet attention will be given because the event was expected.

Repetitive scenes

Chiesa et al (2011, p. 449) notes that individuals have the ability to sustain mindfulness if they consistently view a repetitive scene. Mindfulness can also be fostered by meditation which enables an individual to devote attention to a particular scene.

Visual scenes that are similar to the one given attention are likely to be recognized as indicated by Simons & Chabris (1999, p. 1071). This is because the individual is mindful of the visual scene given attention. In the same way, the scene that is diverse from the one given attention is likely to be ignored.

The positioning of objects, whether moving or still, has little impact on the mindfulness of an individual. If an observer has mental depletion, the position of the object or event will not influence their ability to be mindful. A higher focus of attentiveness on a particular scene will reduce the chances of inattentional blindness.

Perception

Perceptions remain the same in the mind of the individual as stated by Mack & Rock (1999, p. 24). The distance, as well as the size of a scene, has no influence on the inattentive blindness. Mindfulness will also subscribe to the constant perceptions.

Expected scenes have a greater chance of reducing inattentional blindness. Attention is given to events that are likely to happen and hence other events might not be noticed. Similarly, the changes that occur in a scene may also gain inattention.

Simons & Chabris (1999, p. 1073) argues that events that have been given little attention may actually be given attention after resurfacing. In a consecutive scene, such an event will be free of inattentive blindness. However, expected events would receive attention much earlier than the unexpected event.

Mack & Rock (1999, p. 13) points out that, mindfulness is closely related to perceptions. Perceptions are stimulated due to mindfulness given to a particular event. In this case, individuals are aware of the actual event. Thus perception and mindfulness are synonymous.

Simon (2000, p. 150) adds that inattentional blindness is also affected by mental depletion since the attention is directed elsewhere. This is irrespective of how the revelation of the object or event is. It also causes individuals to fail to see relevant scenes or object. It remains as an unattended stimulus because it has the potential of being given attention.

Simons & Chabris (1999, p. 1073) have indicated that perception may occur without the attention of the individual. This argument is not validated by Mack & Rock (1999, p. 13) due to the view that perception occurs only when there is attention. The individual selectively chooses the desirable scenes depending on their interests.

Memory

Memory and mindfulness make it possible to overcome inattentional blindness. This is because the mind affects the ability to provide mindfulness to an event as well as accumulate perceptions of the objects that have been observed. The individuals are considered mindful and free from mental depletion if they recall an event. Mindfulness is therefore an interaction between the internal and external environment.

Chiesa et al (2011, p. 449) reveals that mindfulness increases the ability of memorizing and attentiveness. An Individual’s memory is also increased as he gains skills in attention. There are other events that are constantly happening at a given time and mindfulness is important as it causes one to be aware of the surrounding.

Some scenes or objects may take the entire attention of an individual. At this point the individual is hardly mindful and the other scenes or events are neglected. Another event may gain attention after an individual is acquainted with seeing and being mindful to a few events.

Limitations of human being and emotions

Chiesa et al (2011, p. 449) states that the emotional state of an individual encourages mental depletion. An individual may be engaged in thoughts and still not be able to give attention to the events in the scene. Simons & Chabris (1999, p. 1070) concurs by noting that the brain has a limited ability to recall scenes and the state of the brain plays a major part in inattentional blindness.

An interference between the brain and the scenes influence inattentional blindness. The chance to recognize a scene that has already been seen is lost. Tiredness and over engagement is one of the origins of mental depletion.

Individuals have a limited ability to give attention to the events or objects that are in their scenes. They can also improve their attentiveness by mastering the art of being mindful. Mental depletions are also a major setback for competent mindfulness because they increase the level of inattentional blindness (Mack & Rock, 1999, p. 13).

Discussion

It is evident that in a dynamic scene the inattentional blindness is likely to occur because of the influence of mental depletion. Mindfulness enhances the chances of being attentive if a scene is repetitive and remains the same for a longtime. The mind is also important and what an individual has seen earlier and is able to memorize is easily recognizable.

Distance does not affect inattentional blindness because individuals usually have expectations when they are mindful. This means that unexpected events are given little attention. The mind of an individual is limited and therefore only a certain amount of attention can be awarded to specific scenes at a particular time. Emotionally an individual may have inattentional blindness because they are engaged in certain emotional situations.

Conclusion

Inattentional blindness occurs when an individual is unable to give attention to an event or an object that can be visualized clearly. This is because the human mind is not capable of accommodating all the events that happened at a particular time. For this reason, individuals mind gives priority to those events that are memorable before noticing the new ones.

The position and the size of the event or object is not a factor that influence attention but rather perception. An event that is expected is likely to be seen within the shortest period possible. More so, events that are unexpected may not be seen since there may be no attention.

What is seen has also been perceived hence the mind is important. Thoughts in the mind, the completion of an event and increased attention on a particular single event may foster inattentional blindness. Emotions are also part of disturbances of the mind. Mindfulness which can be learnt can lead to increased attentiveness which limits inattentional blindness.

Reference List

Chiesa, A., Calati, R. & Serretti, A., 2011. Does mindfulness training improve cognitive abilities? A systematic review of neuropsychology ical findings. Clinical Psychology Review. Vol. 31, pp 449- 464.

Mack, A. & Rock, I., 1999. Inattentional Blindness. Web.

Simon, D. J., 2000. Attentional capture and inattentional blindness. Trends in cognitive Sciences, vol. 4, no.4, pp 147- 155.

Simons, D. J. & Chabris, C. F., 1999.Gorillas in our midst: Sustained intentional Blindness for dynamic events. Perception, vol 28, no. pp. 10- 1074.

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IvyPanda. (2019, April 25). How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/how-mindfulness-and-mental-depletion-influence-inattentional-blindness/

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IvyPanda. "How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness." April 25, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/how-mindfulness-and-mental-depletion-influence-inattentional-blindness/.

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IvyPanda. 2019. "How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness." April 25, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/how-mindfulness-and-mental-depletion-influence-inattentional-blindness/.

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IvyPanda. (2019) 'How mindfulness and mental depletion influence inattentional blindness'. 25 April.

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