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Language and Logic: The Similarities and Differences Essay

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Updated: Dec 8th, 2021

Logic and language are different although in many cases they have some relation to each other. Logic is learning about ways of reasoning and argumentation, both appropriate and inappropriate. Language entails how our language relates to our judgment. Many intellectuals believe that it is important to understand them to achieve solid interpretation, coherent judgment, and consistent communication. Logic helps an individual understand means of thinking and interpretation in various studies. It helps individuals have the power to develop their own ideas and evaluate or analyze the ideas of other people. Studying logic helps eliminate many errors that occur in arguments and ideas portrayed by others so that one can formulate their ideas well. (Fierke, 2002)

Logic is defined as the study of the ideologies of accurate reasoning. Logic allows individuals to understand the guidelines overriding the validity of arguments. In this case, one tries to understand whether various deductions are a result of specified assumptions. In this case, if a deduction is true then it follows that the assumption will be true. It’s also important to note that logic is non-contingent in that it does not depend on any unintended characteristics of the globe. This can be illustrated in the example where physicists tell us that no signal moves faster than the speed of light. This means that if the laws of physics were different then this would probably have been false. This implies that the laws of physics are dependent on the fact that they could have been otherwise. However, logic results from using reasoning alone, and its validity are independent of any worldly characteristics. For instance, logically concludes that a statement of the form “If P then P” is automatically correct. This means if logic says “If it is raining, then it is raining” should be true. This clearly shows it is true regardless of whether it is raining or not. (Copi & Cohen, 2009)

A language is a form of transmitting or exchanging ideas between humans. Language is how human beings convey information through which skills, values, and practices are explained and shared. The sharing of information is dependent on symbols, sounds, and signals that represent implicit significance within a social setting. A major function of language is that the symbols are subjective. This means any idea or grammatical rule can be incorporated within a symbol. Though most languages use sounds, the arrangement of various sounds used does not have any basic or intrinsic significance. These sounds are just agreed-upon rules that portray a particular thing among a community using that language. The significance of the signs can be arbitrary; however, the method of conveying significance cannot be arbitrary. This is the practice of the whole society while individuals have no right to modify them arbitrarily even if one can add new ideas. It is important that the documented meaning of these signs and those that individuals add be related. (Fierke, 2002)

Logic and language though related are different in the way they portray meaning in various issues. They should be studied closely to ensure that the right meaning is understood to avoid any confusion between the two. The idea of language portrays the feelings of individuals while logic states the facts which are in society. Their different meanings should be considered in detail before one makes conclusions. There are various areas of study that will allow one to get the right interpretation of language and logic. This ensures that the two meanings are not confused or left without any information.

References

Copi I., & Cohen, C. (2009). HUM200: Introduction to logic: custom edition (13th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

Fierke, K.M. (2002). “Links across the Abyss: Language and Logic in International Relations” international Studies Quarterly, Blackwell Publishing, Vol.46, no.3, pp.331-354.

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