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Pink-Collar Criminal: Gender in White-Collar Crime Essay (Article)

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Updated: Sep 21st, 2020

Purpose

The purpose of the article “Gender in White-Collar Crime: An Empirical Study of Pink-Collar Criminals” is to use different feminist theories to describe the major gaps related to the involvement of women in white-collar crime. The authors explain why the issue of female white-collar crime should be investigated and dealt with (Gottschalk & Glaso, 2013). The article “Theories of Female Criminality: A Criminological Analysis” focuses on feminist theories to explain why more women are engaging in blue-collar crime (Islam, Banarjee, & Khatun, 2014). The purpose of the study was to use different models to understand the nature of female criminality.

Key Questions

The key question addressed in the first article is whether more men committing a white-collar crime in comparison with the detection rate for women engaging in such offenses (Gottschalk & Glaso, 2013). This question was informed by the increasing number of women involved in white-collar crime. In the second article, the targeted question was how different theories of female criminality could be used to explain the involvement of women in crime (Islam et al., 2014). The answer to the question would empower scholars to monitor and understand female criminality.

Data and Methods

The authors of the first article used a qualitative study sample to analyze the rate of white-collar crime in Norway. This methodological approach empowered scholars to use newspaper sources to present quality information. The sample size was 255 persons covered in different newspapers. Twenty of these criminals were women (Gottschalk & Glaso, 2013). This observation revealed that most of the white-collar crimes reported in the media were associated with men. It was necessary to examine the role of feminist theory in describing why fewer women were reported after committing such crimes. The second article relied on a qualitative study focusing on available literature. The authors went ahead to give a comparative analysis of different feminist theories to describe the risk factors for female criminality. According to the article, feminist theories such as opportunity, masculinity, and marginalization explain why some women engage in crime (Islam et al., 2014). Females who lack adequate resources would be willing to engage in crime. Similarly, masculine women tend to engage in blue-collar crime.

Conclusions

Gottschalk and Glaso (2013) indicate that more men are reported for committing white-collar criminal acts. Women might not engage in white-collar due to a lack of organizational power or resources. Additionally, women tend to be perceived as victims rather than culprits. Future studies should, therefore, focus on the uniqueness of every form of female white-collar crime. The second article shows conclusively that each feminist theory delivers the same message. This is the case because many women are currently engaging in violent crime due to different factors such as victimization, disempowerment, and inequality. Since women have less economic opportunities, they decide to engage in crime to improve their lives (Islam et al., 2014). This message should be taken seriously in order to implement adequate social programs to address this predicament.

Limitations

The authors of the first article have failed to explore why female white-collar crimes go unreported. They have also overlooked the linkage between feminist theory and white-collar crime among women (Gottschalk & Glaso, 2013). Future scholars can focus on the unique features of women’s criminality and involvement in corporate fraud. The second article fails to explain how social changes inform female criminality. Failure to use a quantitative research approach also affected the study’s strength. The researchers also overlooked the importance of feminist theories in dealing with female criminality (Islam et al., 2014). Future scholars should present new insights and ideas to empower more women.

References

Gottschalk, P., & Glaso, L. (2013). Gender in white-collar crime: An empirical study of pink-collar criminals. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, 4, 22-34. Web.

Islam, M., Banarjee, S., & Khatun, N. (2014). Theories of female criminality: A criminological analysis. International Journal of Criminology and Sociological Theory, 7(1), 1-8.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Pink-Collar Criminal: Gender in White-Collar Crime." September 21, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/pink-collar-criminal-gender-in-white-collar-crime/.

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IvyPanda. (2020) 'Pink-Collar Criminal: Gender in White-Collar Crime'. 21 September.

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