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Race and Social Class Relationship Research Paper

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Updated: May 29th, 2021

Introduction

The formation of the society and the pace of its development directly depend on people living in it and determining the norms of life. Constant progress has become one of the factors of the transition from a slave system to a civilized one, and today, the person has substantially more freedoms and opportunities than previous generations. Nevertheless, some historical vestiges remain relevant at present. In particular, such social problems are implied as racial inequality and social division into classes. Certainly, today, these manifestations of intolerance are less pronounced than before. However, such factors as race, social classes, and other similar determinants play an essential role from a cross-cultural perspective, and ignoring this order means the acceptance of any form of inequality.

Types of Classes in the Modern Society

The division according to social classes is explained by different criteria. Thus, one of the most common factors is the level of prosperity. According to Parker, poverty is what makes people separated, and this gap widens day by day (204). A large number of people today own multimillion-dollar states while some are unable to earn money for themselves and their families. This difference is the reason for the formation of social strata based on wealth and poverty.

Another criterion that determines the division of society is race. Today, this issue is particularly acute and is regularly considered not only at the state but also international level. As Kulick and Machado-Borges claim, “money is associated with race” (225). It means that the division both in terms of income and race has much in common and can be considered in one cross-cultural context. According to Parks, poverty occurs everywhere, including highly developed countries and states with weak economies (208). A similar situation occurs with racial intolerance. Therefore, these types of class divisions are especially relevant today.

The Formation of Caste Systems

The formation of class systems can be explained in terms of the mentioned approaches. Although a certain relationship between race and social status is traced, a distinction can be made. Thus, for example, Kuper notes that “racial differences are of a more enduring nature than class differences, and there are very extensive social correlates of racial differences in many racially structured societies” (61). In other words, racial inequality is a more serious and significant factor in the manifestation of differences among people than, for instance, low social status. Therefore, issues related to discrimination about the origin and the color of skin cause a great public response and are regularly discussed at the international level.

Severe Manifestation of Discontent and Aggression

If it were not for the frank manifestations of aggression among the representatives of different classes and races, questions would hardly be of great relevance. Nevertheless, periodic resonant cases force society to participate in conflict resolution on interracial, financial, and other grounds. The policy of genocide, which occurs today, was typical for an uncivilized world with an established slave system (Ilibagiza 186). However, today, the manifestations of aggression towards other nations based on intolerance on one of the features, as a rule, racial are quite typical. Moreover, according to Dog and Erdoes, even in modern civilized society, the relationships of people of different races are tense, and the authors draw an analogy with the Nazi regime oriented toward the humiliation and genocide of certain peoples (195). Therefore, from this point of view, the relationship between social classes and race is not traced, and the criterion of origin is the basic factor of intolerance.

Stereotypes Concerning Classes and Races

Some prejudices and stereotypes concerning the features of people form relationships based on bias and intolerance. Cofer, for example, mentions “the destructive effects of the Latina stereotype,” noting that such a type of attitude to this population is well-established (180). Also, Gillborn remarks that the opinion regarding social classes and the division of society are firmly entrenched, and the forms of racism are one of the proofs (278). Accordingly, the problem is not how certain prejudices are expressed but in their cause. Moreover, the more aggressive the forms of aggression are, the higher chances will be that the situation will constantly be aggravated, and serious conflicts will arise as a result of inter-racial and inter-class confrontations. Therefore, the only correct solution in this situation is the change in the consciousness of those people who support any type of intolerance and see society as a class mechanism where each branch deserves a special attitude.

Conclusion

Race and social classes play a significant role from a cross-cultural perspective, and the relationship between these notions is based on bias and intolerance. Inequality is a historical remnant, which, nevertheless, is reflected in modern society and is an actual problem. The formation of public opinion depends on established foundations, and racism, as well as the division into classes according to certain characteristics, is the manifestation of prevailing views. Any forms of aggression and stereotypes can be ruled out if conflicts are not ignored and are suppressed.

Works Cited

Cofer, Judith O. “The Myth of the Latin Woman.” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 180-185.

Dog, Mary C., and Richard Erdoes. “Civilize Them with a Stick.” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 195-202.

Gillborn, David. “Intersectionality, Critical Race Theory, and the Primacy of Racism: Race, Class, Gender, and Disability in Education.” Qualitative Inquiry, vol. 21, no. 3, 2015, pp. 277-287.

Ilibagiza, Immaculée. “Left to Tell.” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 186-194.

Kulick, Don, and Thaïs Machado-Borges. “Leaky.” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 219-230.

Kuper, Leo. Race, Class, and Power: Ideology and Revolutionary Change in Plural Societies. Routledge, 2017.

Parker, Jo G. “What is Poverty?” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 203-207.

Parks, Gordon. “Flavio’s Home.” One World, Many Cultures, edited by Stuart Hirschberg and Terry Hirschberg, 10th ed., Pearson, 2017, pp. 208-214.

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