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History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009 Case Study


Somali has stirred up and attracted global interventions to address various problems that have a common origin. Among many problems resulted from Somalia piracy, its coastline is more pronounced. Case problems do not give answers but gather different opinions, which should be integrated to come up with the best remedy.

The paper will outline two forms of case problems in relation to how a natural resource would dynamically relate with human activity. This will show how different interactions would result in highly negative impact both nationally and globally.

Case problem could be in the form of a given situation that would require different opinions. Consequently, it could be in the form of a report prepared and presented to be reviewed by a government official to see its relevance and seek for possible solutions (Gardner et al, 2008).

Somali piracy crises in 2009 led to devastating effects in different sectors both nationally and globally. The case study is a typical example of the interaction and dependency that exist between human activities and natural environment. Despite the fact that humans are in control of the environment, their interaction can result in impacts that cannot be predicted.

The Somali coastline has many shores so fishing industry is well pronounced in the region. Political instability in 1991 was associated with unregulated fishing and dumping of waste along the coastline by foreign states. Uncontrolled fishing was associated with trespassing and increased minor crime rates later transformed into major piracy attacks (Beeton et al, 2006).

The piracy crises affected social, political and economic factors in Somalia and other states. Military deployment by twenty four countries was done with the aim of suppressing piracy. The most directly affected organizations adopted tolerance approach.

For example, shipping factories avoided the routes that had a high risk of piracy. Ships sailed at a higher speed when around Somali, that was a strategy associated with increased expenditure on fuel.

The London conference held to tackle piracy issue considered collaborative approaches in reduction of the threat. Long-term solutions discussed included international interventions that would donate funds to ensure that state boundaries would be under tight security (Daly, 2007).

The threat of security was specific on the Shabab terrorists that had both long-term and short-term impacts on the entire world. Recently, Kenya has succeeded in suppression of the threat that involved military action deployment in Kismayu where the Shabab culture is rooted.

Eritrea has been reprimanded by the neighbor states due to the postulations that it supplied Somali with weapons (Garnaut, 2008). Interventions should be addressed towards reducing the influence of Eritrea and boosting the efforts of Kenya and Somali in overcoming the Shabab.

Food insecurity as a result of maltreatment from the Shabab claimed lives of about 80000 residents through famine and drought. International organizations have stepped in with relief aid for the victims. It should, however, be noted that this form of relief should not be overemphasized so as to reduce dependency.

Sustainable and long-term interventions like income generating activities need to be encouraged among the residents so as to solve the problem permanently. In the business field, interventions would include adoption of international monetary fund.

Credit facilities allocation in Somali would positively impact many fields both locally and globally. Collaboration with pirates would involve diplomatic actions that would settle the long dated dispute between Somali and foreign states. Adoption of this strategy would mean that Somali would voluntary stop piracy. Consequently, the foreign states would stop dumping waste along Somali coastline (Daly, 2007).

References

Beeton, RJS, Buckley, KI, Jones, GJ, Morgan, D, Reichelt, RE & Dennis, T 2006, Australia State of the Environment 2006: Independent report to the Australian Government Minister for the Environment and Heritage, Paragon Printers Australasia, Canberra, Australia.

Daly, H., 2007, Ecological economics and sustainable development, Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham.

Gardner, G, Prugh, T, Assadourian, E & Starke, L 2008, State of the World 2008: Innovations for a sustainable economy, Norton & Company, New York.

Garnaut, R., 2008, Climate change review: Final report, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra, Australia.

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IvyPanda. (2019, August 20). History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/somali-piracy/

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"History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009." IvyPanda, 20 Aug. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/somali-piracy/.

1. IvyPanda. "History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009." August 20, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/somali-piracy/.


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IvyPanda. "History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009." August 20, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/somali-piracy/.

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IvyPanda. 2019. "History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009." August 20, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/somali-piracy/.

References

IvyPanda. (2019) 'History of Somali Piracy Crises in 2009'. 20 August.

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