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The World Anti-Doping Agency Essay


The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is an independent organization that promotes scientific research and monitors the development of anti-doping campaigns. In addition, the organization puts forward the World Anti Doping Code, the document that harmonizes anti-doping strategies in sport. According to this Code, all athletes should compete in a doping-free environment.

The analysis of the origins of the organization sheds light on the policies and approaches that the agency applies and, therefore, specific attention should be paid to the evaluation of those principles with regard to the ethical principles introduced by the Global Business Standards Codex. A critical assessment of WADA’s regulatory regime is possible by implementing such ethical principles as transparency, fairness, and dignity.

From the perspective of the transparency principle, the WADA’s code should be more concerned with the issues of publicity and objectivity. In this respect, the question arises concerning the morality of the strategies used by the agency. The sporting events, therefore, should not be recognized as corporate activities subject to political and economic environments.

According to Hanstad et al. (2008), “doping was primarily a public relations problem that threatened lucrative television and corporate contracts…worth billions of dollars” (p. 230). Therefore, while adopting anti-doping campaign, the organization at issue should be more focused on the developing equal and beneficial opportunities for individuals participating in sporting events rather than on commercial issues.

Such an assumption refers directly to the case of the Atlanta Olympics when several doping tests were not given to publicity for commercial purposes.

In order to improve the situation the WAGA agency should be more concerned with the transparent reporting to ensure sustainability and control of the sporting events. A transparency policy can effectively be applied through adherence to moral commitment to anti-doping campaign.

Transparency issues can also be improved as soon as the anti-doping campaign is regarded as a form of social monitoring. Surveillance of all procedures and development of individual check-control systems constitute an important technique that should be reconsidered by WADA’s officials.

To integrate changes to a social domain, the agency’s code should undergo philosophical transformation. According to Slugget (2011), “WADA’ surveillance practices often extend beyond sport’s walls and typically involve multiple, interacting agendas including efficiency, policing, legitimation, and appearance of control” (p. 31).

Hence, involving conceptual frameworks is essential for reconsidering the purposes of anti-doping policies adopted by the agency. In addition, the surveillance policies implemented by the agency should come in congruence with the cultural patterns.

Within these provisions Park (2005) emphasizes, “sport is a central cultural technology of governing the social body, a technology to help maintain the body of the population be healthy, efficient, and productive” (p. 177).

Therefore, the governments should rely heavily on cultural practices before implementing a set of ethical principles. In particular, they should prioritize equality, fair competition, and treatment instead of demonstrating high performance by all means.

Looking WAGA regulatory regimes from the fairness principle, the attention should be paid to the analysis fair treatment, training, and performance principles adjusted for all athletes.

Within this context, the fairness principle, on the one hand claims, “athletes have a contractual obligation of sorts to abide by the rules governing a sports, and the use of a prohibited substance breaks or implicit agreement” (Hemphill 2009, p. 314).

Alternatively, the violation of agreement would imply unfair treatment of the parties concerned. On the other hand, a more serious infringement of the contract also contributes to unfair competition among the athletes, as well as violation of the equality rights.

In this respect, “to gain an unfair advantage by intentionally using a prohibited means in training or in performance is considered to be cheating” (Hemphill 2009, p. 314). With regard to the above-presented considerations, the fairness principle relies on such aspects as equal and transparent competition, as well as protection of individual rights during games.

Apart from the equality issues, the fairness principle implies liability and commitment to ensuring equal treatment during competition. Striking the balance between one’s individual privacy right and the necessity to eradicate spread of doping in sports is an important issue that should be taken into the deepest consideration.

In this respect, Halt (2009) refers to Article 8 of European Code, which runs, “Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence” (p. 285). In this respect, in order to find the equilibrium, WADA should be more concerned with the approaches underlining anti-doping principles in regard to the privacy principles.

To follow the principles of dignity, the WADA agency should refers to the analysis of civil rights and its influence on developing power and support for the athletes. This principle is important because it restores confidence in the organization’s potential to protect rights of individuals.

As Houlihan (2004) states, “The generally low levels of trust, co-operation and compatibility between policy makers left loopholes for drug abusing athletes…in the anti-doping regime which was increasingly perceived as poorly managed and reliant upon dubious science” (p. 421).

Therefore, WADA’s work should be oriented on providing opportunities for athletes to regain their confidence in the organization’s efficient management and promotion of civil rights.

Athletes should, first of all, regarded as individuals possessing a set of rights and principles that allow them to freely choose the sports they would like be involved. Principles of freedom and privacy are also included into evaluation of the dignity principles that is presented in WADA’s code (Hard 2010).

According to Tamburrini (2007), the agency successfully meets all ethical criteria and fulfils the dignity principle. Nevertheless, there are some issues that violate athletes’ privacy rights. The major task of the WADA’s code is to uncover the case of drug use, but not to give the personal issues of athletes to publicity. In other words, anti-doping strategies should not contradict the purpose of sport.

With regard to the above-presented criticism of WADA’s regulatory regime, it should be stated that the implemented anti-doping policies fully adhere to the chosen ethical principles, except for several issues.

In particular, the organization should pay closer attention to transparent reporting about cases of drug abuse, excluding the commercial purposes. Second, the code should not prioritize government’s purposes to improve sports performance in the country. Rather, they should be more focused on the welfare and privacy issues.

Protecting civil rights and equality principles is the basic requirement to improve the current situation. Finally, WADA must pay attention to the equality principle in terms of athletes’ competition. In this respect, cultural and social backgrounds must be analysed to avoid conflicts and adhere to the moral principles. Athletes should feel equal treatment and trustful atmosphere during competition.

Reference List

Halt, J 2009, ‘Where is the Privacy in WADA’s “Whereabouts” Rule?’, Marquette Sports Law Review, vol. 20, no. 1. pp. 267-289.

Hanstad, DV, Smith , A, and Waddington, I 2008, ‘Type Your Reference List in Alphabetical Order Below’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, vol. 43, no. 3, pp 227-249.

Hard, M. (2010). Caught In The Net: Athletes’ Rights And The World Antidoping Agency. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, 19(3), 533-564.

Hemphill, D 2009, ‘Performance Enhancement and Drug Control in Sports: Ethical Considerations’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 313-326.

Houlihan, B 2004, ‘Civil Rights, Doping Control and the World Anti-Doping Code’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 7., no. 3, pp. 420-437.

Park, J-K 2005, ‘Governing Doped Bodies: The World Anti-Doping Agency and the Global Culture of Surveillance’, Cultural Studies, Critical Methodologies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 174-188.

Slugget, B 2011, ‘Sport’s Doping Game: Surveillance in the Biotech Age’, Sociology Of Sport Journal, 28, 4, pp. 387-403.

Tamburrini, C 2007, ‘Are Doping Sanctions Justified? A Moral Relativistic View’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 199-211.

Essay /100
Clear Fail Needs Work Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction
Structure
Introduction There is no introduction. The introduction:
  • Has no clear thesis statement OR
  • The thesis statement is not related to the essay question and
  • Does not outline the main points that support your position.
The introduction:
  • Has a thesis statement and
  • Outlines the main points that support your position but may or may not be in the correct order.
The introduction:
  • Has a thesis statement
  • Outlines the main points that support your position but may or may not be in the correct order and
  • Has a few general statements related to the topic.
The introduction:
  • Has a clear thesis statement that relates back to the question
  • Outlines the main points that support your position in the correct order and
  • Has a few general statements about the topic.
The introduction:
  • Has a clear thesis statement that relates back to the question
  • Outlines the main points that support your position in the correct order and
  • Has a few general statements about the topic that clarifies your interpretation of the question.
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Arguments, structure and
Cohesion
  • The arguments are not relevant to the essay question and do not support the thesis statement or
  • The paragraphs are not well structured and
  • The sequence does not match the outline in the introduction.
  • The arguments are somewhat relevant to the essay question but do not support the thesis statement and
  • The paragraphs are not well structured and
  • The sequence does not match the outline in the introduction.
  • The arguments are relevant to the essay question but may not support the thesis statement
  • Some paragraphs are structured well but may or may not have a single topic.
  • Some paragraphs are linked and
  • The sequence may or may not match the outline in the introduction.
  • The arguments are mostly relevant to the essay question and somewhat support the thesis statement
  • Each paragraph is usually structured well with one topic and concluding sentence.
  • Most paragraphs are clearly linked and
  • The sequence matches the outline in the introduction.
  • The arguments are relevant to the essay question and mostly support the thesis statement
  • Each paragraph is structured well with one topic and concluding sentence.
  • Most paragraphs and ideas are clearly linked and
  • The sequence matches the outline in the introduction.
  • The arguments are highly relevant to the essay question and support the thesis statement
  • Each paragraph is structured well with one topic and concluding sentence which links back to the thesis statement.
  • All paragraphs and ideas are effectively linked and
  • The sequence matches the outline in the introduction.
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Use of evidence There is no supporting evidence for the arguments presented. The evidence that is presented:
  • Does not incorporate at least 3 of the required readings
  • Is limited and
  • Is a descriptive summary.
The evidence that is presented:
  • Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings
  • Supports the arguments but
  • Is a descriptive summary.
The evidence that is presented:
  • Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings
  • Supports the arguments
  • Elaborates on its relevance and
  • Uses descriptive ethics.
The evidence that is presented:
  • Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings
  • Supports the arguments
  • Elaborates on its relevance and
  • Uses descriptive and analytical ethics.
The evidence that is presented:
  • Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings
  • Supports the arguments from a number of perspectives
  • Evaluates relevance and
  • Uses descriptive, analytical and normative ethics.
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Conclusion There is no conclusion. The conclusion:
  • Summarises some of the information presented in the body but
  • Does not restate the thesis statement.
The conclusion:
  • Summarises some of the information presented in the body and
  • Restates the thesis statement.
The conclusion:
  • Summarises some of the main arguments in the body of the essay and
  • Restates the thesis statement.
The conclusion:
  • Summarises most of the main arguments in the body of the essay and
  • Restates the thesis statement.
The conclusion:
  • Summarises all the main arguments in the body of the essay;
  • Restates the thesis statement and
  • Makes a final comment without introducing new ideas.
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Academic writing style Does not use:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Connections between ideas and sentences AND
  • Formal academic writing.
Does not use:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Connections between ideas and sentences or
  • Formal academic writing.
May or may not use:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Connections between ideas and sentences and/or
  • Formal academic writing.
Sometimes uses:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and/or
  • Formal academic writing.
Mostly uses:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Concise and formal ideas
  • Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and/or
  • Formal academic writing.
Always uses:
  • Objective and subjective language appropriately
  • Concise and formal ideas
  • Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and
  • Formal academic writing.
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Referencing
In-text citation
  • Few or no resources are acknowledged OR
  • Do not follow the Harvard system OR
  • Uses direct quotes excessively.
  • Some resources are acknowledged
  • May or may not follow the Harvard system OR
  • Uses too many direct quotes.
  • Most resources are acknowledged but
  • Do not accurately follow the Harvard system and
  • May or may not use too many direct quotes.
  • Most resources are acknowledged
  • Accurately follow the Harvard system and
  • May or may not use too many direct quotes.
  • All resources are acknowledged but
  • Do not accurately follow the Harvard system and
  • Quotes minimally and appropriately.
  • All resources are acknowledged
  • Accurately follow the Harvard system and
  • Uses own words.
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Reference list
  • There are less than 6 scholarly references and
  • Most references are not in the body of the essay or
  • It is not in Harvard style.
  • There are less than 6 scholarly references OR
  • Most references are not in the body of the essay and
  • It is not in Harvard style.
  • There are at least 6 scholarly references
  • Most references are cited in the body of the essay and
  • It is in Harvard style.
  • There are at least 7-9 scholarly references
  • Most references are cited in the body of the essay and/or
  • The Harvard style is good.
  • There are 10 scholarly references
  • Most references are cited in the body of the essay and/or
  • The Harvard style is near perfect.
  • There are 10 scholarly references
  • All references are cited in the body of the essay and
  • The Harvard style is perfect.
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Grammar and presentation
Spelling, grammar & punctuation There are major grammatical errors which make the essay difficult to comprehend. There are a lot of spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. There are some spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. There are a few spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. There are minor spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. There are no spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors.
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Presentation Does not:
  • Use assessment template
  • Sign declaration on coversheet AND
  • Adhere to word limit.
Does not:
  • Use assessment template OR
  • Fill in the coversheet OR
  • Sign declaration OR
  • Adhere to word limit.
  • Uses assessment template
  • Fills in some of the coversheet correctly
  • Signs declaration and
  • Adheres to word limit.
  • Uses assessment template
  • Fills in some of the coversheet correctly
  • Ticks the boxes and signs declaration and
  • Adheres to word limit.
  • Uses assessment template
  • Fills in most of the coversheet correctly
  • Ticks the boxes and signs declaration and
  • Adheres to word limit.
  • Uses assessment template
  • Fills in all of the coversheet correctly
  • Ticks the boxes and signs declaration and
  • Adheres to word limit.
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This Essay on The World Anti-Doping Agency was written and submitted by user Zeke Beasley to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Zeke Beasley studied at the University of California, San Francisco, USA, with average GPA 3.3 out of 4.0.

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Beasley, Z. (2019, April 14). The World Anti-Doping Agency [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-world-anti-doping-agency/

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Beasley, Zeke. "The World Anti-Doping Agency." IvyPanda, 14 Apr. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/the-world-anti-doping-agency/.

1. Zeke Beasley. "The World Anti-Doping Agency." IvyPanda (blog), April 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-world-anti-doping-agency/.


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Beasley, Zeke. "The World Anti-Doping Agency." IvyPanda (blog), April 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-world-anti-doping-agency/.

References

Beasley, Zeke. 2019. "The World Anti-Doping Agency." IvyPanda (blog), April 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-world-anti-doping-agency/.

References

Beasley, Z. (2019) 'The World Anti-Doping Agency'. IvyPanda, 14 April.

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