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Act 1 Scene III of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” Analysis Essay

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Updated: Sep 9th, 2021

Act 1 Scene III of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” is an excerpt of a time-tested masterpiece presenting interesting aspects of persuasive writing. Persuasive writing is not about imposing a personal opinion on the reader, but rather about motivating the reader to specific actions and thoughts. Persuasive writing is appealing to emotions as if the author is talking directly to the reader. Scent III is devoted to two dialogues: one between Cicero and Casca and another between Cassius and Casca. Even though all three men talk about Caesar and his appointment as a king, the second major theme is evolving over nature.

If to look closer at the dialogue between Cicero and Casca, they both are wondered by the weather. Casca tells that he has “seen tempests, when the scolding winds have rived the knotty oaks”, when “the ambitious ocean swell and rage” when clouds were “threatening.” He was the witness of terrible disasters; however, in this particular scene, he is afraid of thunder. Through this short dialogue, the author has skillfully conveyed the true character of Casca: the person who exaggerates his strengths. In the second dialogue between Cassius and Casca, Casca is no longer afraid of thunder and says that the weather is wonderful. There is an evident contradiction in his words. He says what other people want to hear rather than what he thinks. This persuasive element motivates the reader to analyze human nature.

The third scene is full of phrases and descriptions appealing to the reader. For example, the phrase “men may construe things after their fashion” is universal and true for modern society as well. Individuals cannot resist societal pressure or avoid stereotypes because people live in society and are dependent on each other. Nevertheless, two persons may have a different understanding of the same situation. Through the dialogue of Cicero and Casca, the author appeals to the reader through rhetorical questions. “Why old men fool and children calculate, why all these things change from their ordinance” – this question has no answer, however, the reader starts thinking about it. It is a power of persuasion.

The line “ye, gods, you make the weak most strong” has a hint at the true attitude of Cassius towards Caesar. Cassius claims to be the friend of Caesar, while at the same time he calls him a weak tyrant. Scene III contains persuasive elements even though the author does not impose his opinion on the reader, but rather smoothly leads to accepting his view through skillful descriptions and appealing phrases. Short phrases deliver messages to the reader about the true essence of Cassius, Casca, and Cicero. From the first lines, the reader accepts the view of the author about each of these three men even though the author does not express his attitude towards them. On the contrary, the reader is motivated to form his attitude while being led to it by the author.

“The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” Act 1 Scene III is a perfect example of persuasive writing because the reader accepts the position of the author as logical and natural and does not even feel persuasion in text. The author does not tell that Casca is a negative character, but the reader accepts this point of view through dialogues. Vivid descriptions, appealing phrases, and indirect talk with the reader make “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” persuasive. Notably, there is no obvious persuasion and the reader is motivated to make his conclusions about events and characters, however, the reader makes the conclusion intended by the author. This is how good persuasion should work.

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IvyPanda. "Act 1 Scene III of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” Analysis." September 9, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/act-1-scene-iii-of-the-tragedy-of-julius-caesar-analysis/.

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IvyPanda. 2021. "Act 1 Scene III of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” Analysis." September 9, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/act-1-scene-iii-of-the-tragedy-of-julius-caesar-analysis/.

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IvyPanda. (2021) 'Act 1 Scene III of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” Analysis'. 9 September.

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