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All Roads Lead to Rome Expression Essay

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Updated: Apr 5th, 2022

The expression above describes the ancient architecture of the Roman Empire. Roman engineers designed roads and subways to intersect in Rome. However, the idiom can be used to explain the different life situations. Physicists use the idiom to explain numerous experiments that arrive at the same goal (The Physics Hypertextbook, 2013). This paper will analyze the idiom using physics terms. Thus, we will analyze vector, displacement, distance, and scalar quantity.

The measurement of magnitude is called a scalar quantity. Scalar quantities do not have any direction. Some examples include time, volume, speed, temperature, length, area, volume, power, work, and density (Spiegel, 2012). Thus, any measurement without direction is called a scalar quantity. The measurement of magnitude with a direction is called a vector quantity. Vector quantities include velocity, displacement, acceleration, thrust, weight, momentum, force, and direction.

Scalar and vector quantities have a single magnitude. Thus, we could correlate their magnitude as a variable. However, vector quantities require direction to describe the position of the magnitude (The Physics Classroom, 2009). Thus, all roads lead to the same point with a common magnitude. Distance is a quantity that identifies the volume of space covered by magnitude. However, distance measurement does not ascertain the direction of magnitude. The measurement of distance with direction is called displacement (The Physics Classroom, 2009). However, the difference between scalar and vector quantity is direction. Thus, displacement is a vector quantity.

Discussion

The analysis above revealed that scalar, vector, distance, and displacement have a shared variable called magnitude. Thus, the distinction between scalar and vector units is direction. Physics is a life science that integrates mathematical approach to a complex situation (The Physics Hypertextbook, 2013). However, physics inventions use scalar and vector components for its completion. Thus, the theory that all roads lead to Rome implies that scalar and vector quantities are the foundation of all physics inventions (The Physics Classroom, 2009).

Headrest theory with Newton’s first law of motion

Newton’s first law of motion states that an object will be in continuous motion or rest until it collides with an external force. Thus, an external force can alter the position of an object (The Economist, 1999). The introduction of the headrest to protect the individual’s neck explains the fundamental law of Newton. Let us consider the impact of collusion on the individual’s body. A car in motions moves at a continuous speed until it collides with a stationary object. At the point of impact, the car moves forwards, consequently, exerting force toward an initial direction. Thus, the force propels the driver towards the direction of the collusion. Observing Newton’s first law, the driver’s head will remain at rest until it hits an external force (The Economist, 1999). Consequently, the driver’s body launches forward in observance of the first law. At this point, the head snaps back in response to the force on impact. The effect of the collusion may cause injuries to the neck. The headrest in automobiles protects the neck against sudden collusion. The theory of the headrest describes three events during collusion. First, the driver’s seat is pulled forward after the collusion. Second, the driver’s head flips forward. Third, the object of impact will resist the force of collusion (The Economist, 1999). The effect of the movement may cause whiplash injury. The headrest example restates Newton’s first law of motion.

References

Spiegel, R. (2012). Schaum’s Outline of Vector Analysis. New York, USA: Schaum Publishing.

The Economist. (1999). Web.

The Physics Classroom. 2009. Web.

The Physics Hypertextbook. (2013). . Web.

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