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Benedict De Spinoza Views on Religion and Politics Relationship Essay

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Introduction

Spinoza is not, for the most part, viewed as an advocate of religion. He is not, for instance, recited currently as a religious scholar despite the fact that it is difficult to find an individual with a greater amount of sway on the contemporary theological colleges. His generalist theology, such as it is, barely appears to fuel divine arousal or restoration, and its instinctive components are not sufficiently definite to generate a religious society.

To be specific, over a hundred years, Spinoza has been portrayed as a “Supreme Being inebriated individual,” mystical, and an individual of faith. However, in a path reminiscent of peculiarities, Spinozism could maybe move to sacredness. Yet, it is not clear what it does toward advancing religion (Den 3).

Supporters of Spinoza as an earnest promoter of religion must contend for their perspectives, notwithstanding monstrous chronicled assessment that Spinoza was either a skeptic or, if nothing else, an opponent of religion (James 12). This feeling is generally communicated just in the name of Leo Strauss’ book “ Spinoza’s Criticism of Creed” as though there was no protection of religion offered by Spinoza and as though it is the way of religion, as opposed to religion as he discovered it in his own particular time, to which Spinoza disapproves.

On the off chance that critics are insistent to the point that Spinoza rules out bare religion, it is no big surprise that Spinoza’s admirers show up continually on edge. From Spinoza’s standpoint on the miracle to prescience, it is absolutely not clear what Spinoza’s defense of faith might be (Den 22).

In this paper, our position is not simply absorbed by either Spinoza’s supporters or opponents. Against the opponents, our case is that Spinoza considered religion important, at any rate in governmental issues. We should start at the end of the day, not with the thought that Spinoza looked to challenge religion, but instead with the possibility that for Spinoza, religion is basically a component of politics. However, against any supporters of Spinoza who may want to contend that his precept is not conflicting with a sound religious atmosphere, we should see that the ramifications of that principle raise a number of difficult issues regarding both the feasibility of religion and its impact on politics.

Spinoza’s theory of politics

Spinoza’s political reasoning is one of a kind since it is the sole power-based liberalism, instead of rights-based liberalism. His philosophy is very different from philosophies such as that of Hobbes and Locke that are hinged on rights. According to Spinoza, the common right of nature and of each person spreads as far as its power. Therefore, everything a person does as per his tendency, he does by the supreme right of nature.

An individual also has as much right to different things in nature as he has influence and power (James 33). It is conceivably tantalizing to claim that Hobbes, too, made individual rights to extend as far as its power, in any case, under the state of nature. However, a number of writers have accurately established that rights and power are not totally co-extensive. Hobbes holds the opinion that rights and power can be forgone once an individual departs the state of nature, while Spinoza believes that nobody can exist outside the state of nature. He stresses that individuals only act as per their own tendency and political dispensation (James 34).

While different scholars are apprehensive about matters of political and ethical authenticity, Spinoza does not view such matters as fundamental. According to him, matters of authenticity and model systems of government are more to do with poets than political theorists and, therefore, people should focus on the ways in which power operates in a political setting and its effective usage. However, this should not be used as a doctrine of what should be the situation in some ethical perspective. In accordance with Leo Strauss, Spinoza’s political ideology lacks an ethical foundation, unlike Hobbes’ political ideology (Den 26).

Without a doubt, Spinoza made power equivalent to a right. As a result, it would be an error to consider Spinoza’s political ideology as articulations about what rights individuals should possessor to see his work as a formula for perfect political associations. Since many authors view political ideology in a similar manner, it is hard to take no notice of Spinoza’s political philosophy. In any case, on the off chance that one doesn’t fight that temptation, one will make genuine blunders in comprehending Spinoza, the most essential of which is to consider “rights” as a conformist idea.

Not at all like, say, Locke, Spinoza is not more concerned with individual rights and commitments to such an extent as he is to detail the different stages of power. In other words, Spinoza paid to much attention to power functions (James 37).

According to him, the right to free discourse is unreservedly a function of power granted by the authority, and freedom can only be enhanced by gaining more power. For this reason, one may wonder what is so liberal about Spinoza’s political ideology. According to Den, the key to comprehending Spinoza’s liberalism recognizes that the majority of liberal states are among the most dominant states and, therefore, the expressive and conformist aspects of his theory are merged under a single preface of power (Den 25).

It was Spinoza who came up with the idea that when individuals are brought together on the premise of interest and for restricted ends, they would coordinate the powers inside society so effectively that the existing powers would eliminate the force of all the paltry oppressions. The many instruments of liberal states, for instance, the constitution and the elected government can have excess power due to their influence on the power and contribution to national unity, and not because it is ethically mandatory or well-intentioned. Spinoza adds that absolute power is subject to local and international politics (Copulsky and College 5).

Surely, the profound liberalism of Spinoza’s theory is precise that the government is not a device for making individuals great. Therefore, the ends of the state are constrained; it makes no commitment to sacredness. At the same time, religion, whose main objective is morality and sacredness, is, as many people claim, an indispensable component of politics. Thus, our next task is to try and reconcile these claims (Copulsky and College 6).

Spinoza’s conception of religion and politics

Like Hobbes, who had earlier taken an interest in religion and politics, Spinoza was apprehensive of the role that religion played in civil strife and separation of power. His answer to the issue of religion and politics is, be that as it may, neither Adam Smith’s answer nor the American answer (Lorberbaum 27). Adam Smith’s solution was one where various organizations contend with each other to the point where they counterbalance each other’s’ impact on society.

Similarly, Spinoza does not settle on the American solution which is to separate religion and politics through a constitutional approach. Instead, Spinoza held the opinion that religion is a critical component of politics whose impact could not be weakened or reduced (Lorberbaum 28).

As stated by Spinoza, knowledge of the bible is very crucial for the public. This is because the public need to be familiar with tales that can best encourage them to be more obedient and devoted. He believed that the public was not sufficiently shrewd to make wise judgments and, therefore, needed the help of religious leaders (Mastnak 31). He adds that religious leaders cannot be sidelined from politics since they are the translators and watchmen of religious law.

In many of his works, Spinoza sought not to expel religion from politics; instead, he tried very hard to establish a suitable type of settlement. For instance, he suggests total religious freedom in jurisdictions governed by monarchs. While for states governed by ruling elites, he suggests vast and sublime state chapels (Mastnak 31). There is no sign that he imagines of governmental issues without religion.

On the contrary, if we regarded Spinoza to be a fan of Machiavelli, as he had stated in some of his works, then the following statement from Machiavelli might help us discern Spinoza’s way of reasoning. According to Machiavelli, since the adherence to a celestial cult is the reason for the enormity of states, so abhor for it is the reason for their collapse. For where the fear of Supernatural Being falls flat, it must be either that the realm collapses or that it is maintained by the apprehension of a ruler who supplies the imperfections of religion. Just like Spinoza, Machiavelli stresses on the indispensability of religion to governmental issues (Lorberbaum 28).

Be that as it may, even the most superficial perusing of Spinoza’s work demonstrates that Spinoza’s desire to change religion is because of its clear perturbing relationship to politics (Lorberbaum 33). How then does Spinoza intend to blend the two? Spinoza considers democracy as the most normal and innate type of political society. This does not mean that it is the best form of political society. Nonetheless, Spinoza believed that the most excellent form of political system should give power to the people. Given the fact that this is the similar audience for whom the religion emphasizes on, one will ask whether religion and politics crisscross in one way or the other (Mastnak 41).

Spinoza argues that both religion and politics have a similar end, that is, compliance. For that reason, if obedience is the end, the two should safeguard it by attractive the desire and dreams of the people. Thus, religion and politics cannot be separated on the premise of their individual goals, but only, if by any stretch of the imagination, on the premise of the means these individuals (Mastnak 43).

However, this is not exactly precise on the grounds that it suggests that Spinoza’s strategy is one that differentiates variously intends to compliance. Rather, what Spinoza does is to recognize the vital components of solid submission as they may be found in either governmental issues or religion while leaving what is most certainly not basic and fundamental to both to their separate domains. What gets sidelined in both religion and legislative issues under this process was what was generally thought fundamental to each. In legislative issues what is disregarded is a compulsion, whereas in religion what gets sidelined is revered Scripture (Mastnak 44).

It is not that either one vanishes, but instead both no longer serve to characterize the focal point of political existence. What has supplanted them, and what is the most intense component in both religion and legislative issues is deliberate willingness to comply (Mastnak 44). The prior may give the notion that Spinoza looks to secularize religion (in spite of the fact that he has from time to time given the notion of theologizing legislative issues), and in a specific sense that is irrefutable.

By concentrating on what it is about religion that is workable to legislative issues, religion loses a lot of its free and superior aspects. To be specific, it may be claimed that Spinoza has of now presumed the secularization of religion when compliance turns into the object of religion instead of, say, sacredness, redemption, or individual immortality. It is unequivocally here, in any case, that another element of Spinoza’s association with liberalism can be established (Mastnak 45).

The government has nothing to add to one’s attainment of sacredness, with the exception of maybe by giving an atmosphere that is sufficiently safe to do so. In reality, sacredness has nothing to do with compliance. This is because most people tend to appeal to the levelheaded obedience. For this reason, the main part of religion left that is applicable to governmental issues is what involves acquiescence, for it is here and just here that the two domains crisscross each other (Barbone 305).

What’s more, since confidence in chronicled stories cannot provide us with information on God, and thus cannot make individuals adore him either, what Spinoza winds up doing is less secularizing or challenging religion as showing the superfluity of legislative issues to genuine sacredness. It is the conventional conviction that one’s state or society can make a contribution to one’s actual sacredness that Spinoza rubbishes (Barbone 306).

Likewise, as we simply observed, Spinoza rubbishes the notion that the most influential state is the authoritarian one. Regardless of arguments that the state having the privilege to do whatever it has the authority to do, Spinoza’s conviction of political acquiescence is based on the idea of willingness (Den 28). According to him, acquiescence is more of external action than of the thinker’s inward action, so that the individual who wholeheartedly chooses to comply with all the orders of another is completely under his influence and, therefore, the one who governs in the hearts of his followers has the overall power (Den 29).

The problem with such viewpoint of acquiescence is that politics is not able to supply what will advantage it most, that is, voluntariness. This is due to the fact that the majority of politics tends to be forceful and focused towards exterior conduct. Therefore, if the state is to be extremely commanding, it must gain much of that command from the only establishment that has traditionally created alacritous acquiescence, that is, religion (Den 29).

On the other hand, religion does to appear to have the well-being of the state as its object. As a result, it is important to make the object of religion a thing that is likewise appropriate as an object of political life. Sacredness cannot be considered in this case since it is something that is accomplished past legislative issues and on the grounds that it is not a type of submission at any rate. What is needed is a novel type of submission, one that meets the object of religion and at the same time does not redirect the power of the state into different streams of command (Den 30).

The Jewish state provides the best model of an interface between religion and politics that was largely admired by Spinoza. The Jewish state is essentially discussed in most of his work as part of an assault on customary biblical power and the precept of the voting of the Jewish leaders. However, the somewhat extensive discussion of the Jewish state ought to tell us that something more than denigration is taking place (Mastnak 48).

As a matter of first priority, the establishments of power in the Jewish state were basically vote based. From the scripture, we find that the Jewish people surrendered their right to a single individual to act as their liaison with God as in a democratic state. However, the covenant made them equal and had the equal right to communicate with God and decipher his laws. To be specific, they were all equally responsible for the running of the state (Mastnak 49).

Moreover, when Moses led the Israelite out of the Egypt as per the scripture he went to considerable lengths to see that the general population undertook their duties willingly and without coercion. We are informed that the Jewish state could have carried on persistently if certain issues had not cropped up (Mastnak 49). If the Jewish state truly is an example of a perfect state for Spinoza, why then not just promote a religious government like it? Spinoza explains that it is neither fitting nor conceivable to duplicate the Jewish state in our contemporary world.

The main reason he gives is that since the agreement is no longer inscribed in paint or rock tablets but in individual souls, it is not possible to enter into an agreement with the Supreme Being as the Jewish people did. The second and the most important reason is that such states are very much restricted in the current world (Mastnak 50).

If a religious government is very much constrained in the current world and yet politics is not able to maximize the power of the state, then an object of acquiescence that can service both religion and modern politics must be discovered (Lorberbaum 37). Whereas an all-inclusive religion described by Spinoza can achieve that end, it is not really its all-inclusiveness and doctrinal moderation that concerns many analysts. Neither of these attributes is crucial on the grounds that, despite the fact that they might both jointly achieve the unity of legislative issues and religion, they don’t clarify what it is about that solidarity that is likely to arouse the sort of willing submission Spinoza needs and the religious appeal of that compliance (Lorberbaum 38).

This brings us to the concept justice and charity (love) as proposed by both Hobbes and Spinoza. According to Spinoza, the worship of the Supreme Being comprises of both justice and charity. Charity basically refers to love towards our neighbors (Den 35). The two fuses religion and politics in the sense that the safest way to safeguard the state is by ensuring that the rights of all individuals are protected and no one is subordinated. Justice is usually linked to politics, whereas charity (love) is normally linked to religion. However, Spinoza makes charity basically an ethical concept. This is because morality has always been an embodiment of religion. As a result, religion and politics can be interfaced through charity and justice (Den 36).

Application of Spinoza’s ideas on the controversial subject of gay marriage

The issue of gay marriage has been a subject of heated debate, particularly between the supporters of religious values and the proponents of secular life (mainly politicians). In fact, Gay marriage is one of the most contentious topics in the contemporary world. Traditionally, marriage was viewed as a union between people of opposite gender and, therefore, homosexuality was looked at with contempt or prohibited altogether.

However, gay relationships are gradually becoming accepted in the society today thanks to the spirited fight for gay rights among the pro-gay activists. Opponents of gay relationship argue that it goes against the religious values and that it would affect the next generation. On the other hand, the proponents of the gay relationship believe that it is their basic human right. In addition, they claim that marriage is between two people and that gay people have a right to marry.

Besides being liberalists, Spinoza was also a monist. He believed that sole object of mind was the body; for this reason, what affected the mind also affected the body. In this case, the religious and ideological concerns regarding the body are rendered null and void. For example, religion cautions against the desires of the body, whereas many philosophers warn against trusting human senses and refer to them as falsehood. In both cases, the body is disgraced for deceiving the mind. On the other hand, Spinoza believes that body is mind and, therefore, desires of the body are also the desires of the mind (Copulsky and College 88). In this case, homosexuality is considered as any other form of romantic relationship.

The gay relationship may also be defended based on the concept of justice and charity. According to Spinoza, the rights of all individuals must be protected and no one should be subordinated. Given the fact that gays are tax payers like any other individual, are free to choose their partners and have legal benefits, they must be protected. However, since the issue of gay marriage is subject to political and religious dynamics, this cannot be guaranteed.

This is because in some jurisdiction politics and religion go hand in hand, and Spinoza always strived to find a balance between the two. Furthermore, Spinoza believed that the most excellent form of political system should give power to the people, but the masses cannot make shrewd decisions and, therefore, need the help of religious leaders.

Since Spinoza’s political reasoning was power-based, there is a likely chance that individuals or states may influence public perception regarding the gay community. The influence may be positive or negative. For instance, the United States of America has been on the forefront in advocating for the rights of gays and lesbians. To be specific, the U.S. President Barack Obama has been the number one advocate for gay marriage. As a result, a number of states have legalized gay marriage. However, the freedom to exercise gay marriage by gaining more power cannot apply in this case.

Conclusion

Spinoza’s political reasoning is one of a kind since it is the sole power-based liberalism, unlike his colleagues who believes in right-based liberalism. According to Spinoza, the common right of nature and of each person spreads as far as its power. In other words, the right to free discourse is unreservedly a function of power granted by the authority and the freedom can only be enhanced by gaining more power. In this case, Spinoza believes that nobody can exist outside the state of nature.

Therefore, more focus should be on the ways in which power operates in a political setting and its effective usage. He also adds that when individuals are brought together on the premise of interest and for restricted ends, they can coordinate the powers inside society so effectively that the existing powers can eliminate the force of all the trivial oppressions. Last but not least, Spinoza believes religion is basically a component of politics and, therefore, leaders should always strive to find a balance between the two.

Justice and charity (love) play a very significant role in establishing that balance. Spinoza makes charity an ethical concept. This is because morality has always been an epitome of religion. As a result, religion and politics can be fused together through charity and justice.

Works Cited

Barbone, Steve. “Virtue and Sociality in Spinoza.” Lyyun 42 (1993): 303-395. Print.

Copulsky, Jerome and Goucher College. The Last Prophet: Spinoza and the Political Theology of Moses Hess, American Academy of Theology, 2007. Print.

Den, Douglas. Power, Politics, and Religion in Spinoza’s Political Thought, Free Press, 2016. Print.

James, Susan. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics: The Theological-Political Treatise, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Print.

Lorberbaum, Menachem. Spinoza’s Theological-Political Problem, Tel Aviv: Tel Aviv University, 2006. Print.

Mastnak, Tomaž. “Spinoza: Democracy and Revelation.” Filozofski vestnik 2.19 (2008):31-59. Print.

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