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Spinoza’ Thoughts on Human Freedom

The human being was once considered of as the Great Amphibian, or the one who can exclusively live in the two worlds, a creature of the physical world and also an inhabitant of the spiritual, [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 11
  • Words: 2775

The Teachings of Plato Socrates and Machiavelli

In The Apology, Socrates stands before a jury of his peers accused of "committing an injustice, in that he inquires into things below the earth and in the sky, and makes the weaker argument the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 975

Socrates Figure: Based on “the Apology” by Plato

This is evidenced within the text of the Apology as Socrates begins his defense of himself against the old enemies that have spoken falsely "telling of one Socrates, a wise man, who speculated about the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1384

Mill’s vs. Kant’s Ethical Theories on Lie

Stuart Mill's utilitarianism and Emmanuel Kant's deontology, to answer the question is it acceptable to lie to my friend to spare her feelings if the lie would not cause great harm?
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 9
  • Words: 1713

Political Freedom According to Machiavelli and Locke

In this chapter, he explains that "It may be answered that one should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, is much safer to be feared than [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1414

Heidegger’s Argument on Dasein and Being

His studies point to the fact that only when a man begins to inquire about the meaning of Being [Dasien] and its presence in the beings of experience does he grasp his own essential reality [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 568

Bentham’s and Mill’s Theory of Utility

In other words, his theory of utility is based on the principle of moral obligation: the greatest pleasure for the greatest number of people who are involved or affected by the action performed by one [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 636

Aristotle: Natural Changes and His Theory of Form

The form of an object is the arrangement of the comprising components making up the object in focus. This is the counterpart of the subjects of predication in the Categories.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 556

The Argument of Being and Becoming

In summary, becoming is seen as the special case of being. The research on philosophy of being and becoming was confusing in defining the clear distinction between the two concepts.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 613

“In Praise of Idleness” by Bertrand Russell

The author makes an assumption that the net result of economic habits is to fund the armed forces of the country because people lend savings to the government.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 601

Living By Own Convictions Philosophy Analysis

He did his duties as a citizen, and stoically bore the privations of poverty and a shrewish wife.he did not expound his philosophies, but rather chose to converse with people and by the very act [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1198

Free Will and Argument Against Its Existence

Determinism is a theory which states that the course of the future is determined by a combination of past events and the laws of nature, creating a unique outcome.
  • Subjects: Freedom Philosophy
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1508

The Concept of Epiphenomenalism

According to consciousness, the flow of information goes from the mental aspect to the physical aspect, which means that consciousness rise due to the interaction of the physical as well as the mental and cognitive [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1644

The Socratic Legacy or the Cynic Legacy

The Socratic legacy understand that the moral life is the best life for the agent thus has the central role of linking Socrates' intuitions of the pre-eminence of morality with the theory of uniform self-interested [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 981

Plato and Aristotle Thoughts on Politics

Aristotle emphasized that the lawgiver and the politician occupied the constitution and the state wholly and defined a citizen as one who had the right to deliberate or participate in the matters of the judicial [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1651

Aristotle and His Definition of Happiness

The best taste a person can have in his life is happiness because of success. But in my point of view, happiness is the main feeling that comes from the success of any useful act [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1405

What Leads to Cooperation and Competition

It is the practice of individuals or larger societal entities working in common with mutually agreed-upon goals and possibly methods, instead of working separately in competition, and in which the success of one is dependent [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1504

Comparing the Portrayal of Socrates as Philosophical Martyr

Accomplishing the first claim of the assignment, it is necessary to emphasize, that Socrates as a historical person is viewed as the philosopher and sage who always lived in poverty, and Socrates is often regarded [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 902

Philosophy Schools Metaphysical Dualism

Following Descartes, the essence of the mind is thought, the essence of the body is the extension. The boundary between the mind and the body is grounded in the distinction between the intelligent and the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1468

Plato’s Republic: Perspectives on Politics

No doubt to avoid engendering such reactions in their first experiences with Plato, Rice has sought to minimize the buzz of controversy virtually to the point of elimination from view and to focus instead on [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1670

Philosophical Perspectives on Death and Dying

These are fear of premature death, fear of the idea of death, fear of the dying process, fear of the death of significant others, fear of the unknown, fear of being destroyed, fear of the [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2520

Truth is Layered: Hegel’s and Moses’ Philosophies

Reading, beyond the list, is an understanding, by a subject, of the sense manifests only in and as the determinate bondings of words; the words, the "list," are the expression of a force of meaning, [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 967

Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, David Hume

Hume's critique of theology is driven by and expressed as a suspicion that natural theology is for the most part an unconscious effort to rationalize and legitimate a preexisting and culturally acquired religious view of [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages:
  • Words: 1924

The Concept of Success From Different Aspects

Bessie Stanley, the author of the poem, What is a success, described success as, "He has achieved success who has lived well, laughed often, and loved much; Who has enjoyed the trust of pure women, [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1418

The Amish Lifestyle and Religion

Dressing style is one of the most confronting aspects of the Amish religion in the sense that they tend to be traditional in their dressing styles and their dressing styles are the most simple ones.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1886

Comparative Eastern Influence on European Religion

They are based on philosophies that so much influence the life of the people in these regions. Confucianism advocated for social responsibility and that is why it has influenced the people of china for a [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 606

John Locke and His Epistemological View of Matter

It is very clear that John Locke's theory about material things understanding and perceiving them is an attempt to contribute to the advancement of epistemology. Locke was mistaken in assuming that there is nothing certain [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 10
  • Words: 3195

Machiavelli’s ‘The Prince’ Review

This book can be understood as the first modern text of political theory in the West because it sets down a pattern of conduct and policy which a "wise" sovereign should follow if he desires [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 711

Mencius of Medieval China Analysis

Xun Zi was a Confucian who hailed the belief that human nature is originally evil, and the purpose of moral cultivation is to develop our nature into goodness.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1244

Free Will and Determinism Analysis

Jonathan Edwards, in his fundamental work The Freedom of the Will, argues that the will always choose according to its greatest desire at the moment of choice.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 7
  • Words: 1579

“The Republic” by Plato Review

The allegory of the cave illustrates the place of the form of the good at the top of Plato's hierarchy. It addresses the images of education and governance.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1481

Buddhism in Koryo Analysis

Although some of the concepts similar to the teachings Buddhism had spread to Paschke and Koguyo, the places inhabited by the Koryo people, the religion preached by Buddha could not be firmly established in two [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 871

Meeting of Buddhist Monks and Nuns

The stupa became a symbol of the Buddha, of his final release from the cycle of birth and rebirth - the Parinirvana or the "Final Dying," the monk explained. He explained that the main Buddha [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2097

Socrates and Descartes: Similarities and Difference

The third rule is that the logical process must proceed step by step from the simplest and easiest portion of the problem to clearly and distinctly know and progress in order of difficulty to the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1304

Metaphor in “Lifeboat Ethics” by Garrett Hardin

As the relevance and the appropriateness of the metaphor are established, it is of paramount significance to consider the different aspects of the question in a meaningful and judicious manner.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2004

Philosophy. “Scepticism” by Anthony Clifford Grayling

This article deals with the various theoretical aspects governing scepticism and tries to throw light on the contentions of the various schools of thoughts regarding their perception and perspective of what constitutes scepticism in the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 996

Analytic Philosophy, Its History and Branches

The historical origins of analytic philosophy can be swiftly featured in three-wide cares: Initially, the positivist view is that there are no particularly philosophical realities and that the object of philosophy is the reasonable amplification [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 608

Karl Mark as an Economic Philosopher

The central concepts of Marxist economics include the theory of labor value, the disposition of production, and the inevitable conflicts between the classes.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 614

Bergson’s and Whitehead’s Philosophy of Evolution

The main problem in the philosophy of Bergson is the principle of the psychological functions and naturally, a matter which is presented as the body of the cosmos should be sovereign of these functions.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 1064

Ethical Philosophy. Moral Relativism

The idea that man is inherently selfish and is motivated only by his fundamental needs is not a new one. The idea is that any act of a human being requires some basic motivational factor.
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 681

Teachings of Buddhism as a Means To Alleviate Sadness

Buddhism, one of the major religions of the world, provides valuable teachings on how to alleviate sadness in life, among others specifically advocating Contentment, Peace of Mind and Love, all of which lie at the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 789

Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave”

The world outside the cave is the logical place; which is reachable to logic but not to insight; the voyage outside of the cave into daylight of the world is the soul's inclination to the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 515

Philosophy of Kantianism Critique

The ethics in Kantianism are deontological in nature which is based on the duty of the person instead of the emotional feelings and the goals.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 590

Galileo and Newton on Science and Religion

Galileo said that those who wish to genuinely and intelligently understand the biblical passages should look for the 'true sense of the passages.' According to him, the Bible has kept something obscure so that it [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 1
  • Words: 294

The Concept of Political System by Carl Schmitt

The state is exhausted in official activity under the authority of positive law, which leads to the liberal claim that the state of exception is a state of lawlessness.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1248

The Theory of Good Life

In this theory, Aristotle refers to a good life as being a happy life. Aristotle says that good life, since it is a final end, is explained in terms of human functions.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1452

Ethical Egoism: Arguments For and Against

In personal ethical egoists, the belief is that one should pursue his or her own interest without telling other people what they are ought to do.
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 689

Utilitarianism as an Ethical Principle

From this, he obtained the regulation of usefulness, that the good is anything that brings the maximum happiness to the maximum number of people.
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 782

Are All Animals Truly Equal Like Humans?

Singer, the philosopher, and author of the article makes it clear that the extension of the basic principle of equality from one group to another does not imply that both groups are to be treated [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 7
  • Words: 2477

Hobbes’ Conception of an Absolute Sovereign

He claims that the self-preservation of an individual is the primary factor that motivates the formation of society and induces the transfer of some of the liberties to a common power.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 669

The State of Law Nowadays Analysis

The question that this paper seeks to answer is whether the law is dead. This is a question of a mutually complementary relationship between the law and the citizens where it prevails.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 617

Theory of Justice According to Plato

The next task is to find the existence and nature of justice in this state. Plato adds to this that justice is "the principle of doing one's own business".
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2465

Philosophy: Herbert Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man

In the chapter entitled "The concept of essence", Marcuse defines the philosophical construct of the essence as the abstraction and isolation of the one true form of existence from a multitude of changing appearances, and [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1203

American Government’s Power and Abuse

In the role of representatives of the people, it is prudent that the legislators seek to act in the best interest of the majority of the people and to do so with its input.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 541

The Great Philosophers: Spinoza, Bentham, Mill, Kant

The interpretation of good and bad is dependent upon the context in which it is perceived. The philosophers Bentham and Mill associated the concept of utilitarianism with the study of ethics.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 557

Ethical Egoism vs. Altruism Theory

In philosophy, egoism is the theory that one is self is or should be; the motivation of one's action. This divergence can be explained further using the following features of the concept of ethical egoism: [...]
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1294

Public Opinion: The Image of Democracy by Lippmann

He is of the opinion that America political writers and the political class deliberately blocks public opinion to serve their own interests; "The existence of a force called public opinion is in the main taken [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 840

Absolute Knowledge Issues Analysis

The quest for absolute knowledge is fruitless because not a single person is able to claim with certainty that the specific idea or knowledge is absolute. Knowledge is the result of examination of ideas to [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 640

Defense of Socrates

For several times in the course of life I became convinced in the fact that the more a person knows the more he or she needs to know.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1167

Anaximander’s vs. Greek and Darwin’s Theories

He was one of the first proponents of science as the positive and pragmatic knowledge needed for understanding the world and manipulating different things and processes.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 756

Utilitarianism vs. Moral Relativism

If to assume that moral relativism is true, then it is impossible to discuss good and bad outside the specific situation. Thus, their actions were morally wrong according to the assumptions of moral relativism.
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1213

Political Obligation and Civil Disobedience

The disparity between the issues of legal political obligation and moral obligation makes it hard for liberal political theorists to analyze the natural duty and the moral basis of any person's submission to his or [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1455

Zhuangzi Philosophy and Theorem of Language

He lived during the reign of King Hui of Liang and the time of King Xuan of ai. He was from the town of Meng which was situated in the state of song.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1577

Philosophy. The Socratic Method: What Is It?

As a position is defined, it is continually questioned and counter-questioned, eventually bringing the conversation around to a point where the original response is contradicted by the responder while the way in which it is [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 564

Political Obligation: Contract or Consent

Basically, the political obligation can be considered as the duty of the members of the population and the people of the nation to abide by the laws and the provisions of the constitution.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1673

Master Zhuang’s Philosophical Theory of Freedom

Zhuang Zi is the name for both the traditional sinological transcription of the name of the putative author, and of the title of his major work Zhuang Zi."Chuang Tzu" is simply the transliteration according to [...]
  • Subjects: Freedom Philosophy
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 2066

The Problem of Evil: A Philosophical Interrogation

A philosophical theory of evil can be expected to address many questions of meaning and value that pertain us to think in multiple dimensions at a time like thinking of "evil" a concept worth preserving [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 14
  • Words: 4596

Rationalism. The Theory of Knowledge

The allegory is preceded by the analogy of the divided line and metaphor of the son. Descartes is considered to be one of the greatest rationalists.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 836

Philosophy. Metaphysics: What Is It?

The idea of necessity is that any necessary fact is true across all possible worlds; that is, we could not envisage it to be otherwise.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 597

Benjamin’s and Adorno’s Theories of Esthetics

It should be noted that unlike other reactions to these changes Adorno and Benjamin's stances have critical potential as both these authors can be placed within the Left tradition of philosophical thought.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2582

Marcus Aurelius’ vs. Machiavelli’s Ideal Ruler Concept

Concepts of the roles and duties have differed across civilizations and many discourses, books, and precepts have been offered to the young prince about how to conduct themselves in the affairs of the state.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 663

Minister: Temptations, Blessings, and Rule of Life

The temptation to be relevant is likely to affect the life of a minister in case they forget that serving the Lord and following His Word should be the focus of their efforts and, instead, [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 13
  • Words: 3630

Chapter 6 of “Philosophy of Religion” by Rowe

During this week, Chapter 6, "Faith and Reason", has to be analyzed to contribute to the discussion of theism and atheism and clarify the connection between faith and reasons.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 1
  • Words: 312

Clifford’s and James’ Philosophical Articles

2 Both ideas make sense, and the goal of this review is to compare the opinions of James and Clifford to strengthen an understanding of the connection between beliefs, evidence, and sentiments.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1676

Philosophy of Evil and Suffering in Christianity

People are free to share their opinions and beliefs, but one thing remains the same that the presence of evil and suffering in human life disrupts the idea of God's supernatural powers.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 1
  • Words: 289

Philosophy: “Death” Essay by Thomas Nagel

Therefore, the first element of viewing death is evil that the author examines is the contrast of this occurrence to life, which is perceived as good.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1118

Hobbes’ Ontology within “Leviathan”

Nevertheless, Hobbes seems to distinguish his writings on the Law of Nature from realistic conditions, with the philosophy based on maxims of the knowledge of human nature and behavior that apply moral precepts on science [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 475

Research Philosophy: Importance and Types

According to Dougherty and Slevc, the identification of one's research philosophy when participating in scientific research is vital because it clearly articulates the goals and estimated outcomes of a study, as well as the perspectives [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 834

Faith and Critical Reason Issues

My understanding of faith is close to the definition suggested by Tilley, who argues that faith is the relationship between the person who has faith and that "which one has faith in".
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1410

Political Economy and Emergence of Welfare States

5 The present paper aims at identifying and explaining these factors, evaluating the role that worldviews may play in the emergence of welfare states, and analyzing the impact of presumptions and ideologies on the Iranian [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1419

Ethics of War

The Peloponnesian War was a significant period in the history of the Mediterranean region, which caused the deterioration of the power of Athens and made Sparta the key city-state in the area.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1165

David Hume’s Gnoseological Skepticism

One of the main criticisms of David Hume's gnoseological model has been traditionally reflective of the assumption that being strongly reductionist denies the possibility for people to be able to attain a complete understanding of [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1405

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth

It is thus possible to say that the text describes a ritual that is performed by the priest in the name of God to determine if a woman is impure or not to make her [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 842

Stoics and Epicureans’ Philosophies of Life

In their respective teachings, namely, Enchiridion and Meditations, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius provide insightful thoughts regarding the philosophy of life as depicted in the course of people's search for happiness and improved livelihood. The Epicurean [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1414

Political Legitimacy Matrix

Locke states that people are "constantly exposed to the invasion of others...and the greater part no strict observers of equity and justice, the enjoyment of the property he has in this state is very unsafe". [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 858

Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville

The present paper will explore the characteristics that make Bartleby a man of his time and comment on the opposition between the character and the narrator.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 899

Karl Marx’s Ideas on Private Property

At the same time, the philosopher believed that in order to realize the full potential of humanity and every individual, the practice of alienated labor, as well as private ownership and class division associated with [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1116

The Art and Danger of the Question

The study of ancient thinkers' philosophical arguments, their concepts, and the interpretation of certain social norms and laws is the goal of the educational course and the work conducted during this period.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1189

Value Judgments in Scientific Research

This is because the inductive risk, or the risk of error in rejecting or confirming a scientific hypothesis, forces scientists to make value judgments.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 560

Chapter VIII of Adam Smith’s “Wealth of Nations”

As for the wages and labor section of The Wealth of Nations, it appears that Smith regards workers as a homogenous human capital with transferable and, hence, subject to substitution.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1003

Determinism Argument and Objection to It

The key idea behind this notion is that "everything that's happening now and that will happen in the future was already guaranteed to happen by things that happened in the distant past".
  • Subjects: Freedom Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1103

Fine-Tuning Teleological Argument and Objections

The objection states that the observation that humanity exists is claimed to support the fine-tuning argument. Therefore, the people who use fine-tuning to prove God's existence do not deny the possibility of non-carbon life.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1191

Monistic Views on the Mind-Body Debate

If the mind does not need the physical body to exist, it means that the state of unconsciousness due to injuries and other objective reasons is impossible.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1161

“Washing Away Your Sins” by Zhong & Liljenquist

The participants in the third study were asked to repeat the recalling process of the first study after which they had to choose between a pencil and an antiseptic wipe as gifts.
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1215
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