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Plato’s Concept of the State: The Philosophy of Justice

Taking into consideration the fact that Plato was actually trying to create the image of the ideal state and show the means which in his understanding are the key issues to building up the society [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1554

Theory of Fear as a Part of Public Policy

As Machiavelli points out, fear is an integral part of the policy of a prince, in case it bites not his royal majesty, but the people of the state. And since that certainly means a [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1829

Augustine: On Free Choice of the Will

Importantly, Augustine on the free choice of the will indicated that the mind cannot be forced to be a slave to lust.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 668

Private and Public Property

On the other hand, public property is the type of property mostly owned by governments or the public which is available for all.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2569

John Stuart Mill’s “On Liberty“ Book Analysis

One of the fundamental concerns of social and political philosophy has been the topic of what levels of restrictions if any, should be placed on the liberty of a nation's inhabitants.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 562

Discovering Faith: The Search for Truth and Certainty

The author starts his article with "truthseekers" using reason and faith as tools to find the truth. As opposed to both extremes- Fundamentalist Protestantism and Christian apologetic- Taylor argues that it is wrong to ridicule [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 298

Art Theory and Beauty in Plato’s The Symposium

The Platonic dialogue in The Symposium epitomizes the progression that Diotima describes as pursuance of beauty in highly refined and generalized forms and each speech in the symposium takes the reader closer to the comprehension [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1374

John Locke’s Philosophical Views and Style

He viewed everything in light of the law of nature, which to him constituted freedom to all human beings and the right to life and own property.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 9
  • Words: 2502

Socrates as a Classic of Western Philosophy

Socrates strongly dismisses this argument claiming that what matters is the opinion of that person with the relevant knowledge and not that of the general majority.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1106

Philosophy. Scientific Theory and Falsifiability

Under the scientific point of view, theories are reserved for explanations of phenomena that adhere to requirements about the observations made and the means to which it's classified plus the consistency of the theory makes [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 844

The Ship of Theseus: An Ancient Thought Experiment

The ship begins a voyage around the world and in the course of this voyage some of the parts of the ship inevitably break. The entire framework of the ship that left the port has [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 527

Nietzsche & Emerson vs. Rational Western Existentialism

According to Nietzche, simpler situations are always true and the problem is that people tend to complicate standards by engaging the emotive qualities of existentialism instead of focusing on the simple tenets of the truth.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 816

Greek Philosophies of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle

It is argued that the origin of philosophy as a discipline owes its origin to the contribution of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle."Socrates' contribution to the love of wisdom was manifested by the belief that philosophy [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 564

Recollection Theory in Philosophy

The theory of recollection was an answer to Meno's paradox that states that man needs not learn anything new as what they know is enough, and what they do not know are not necessary.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 829

Plato: Redefining Objectiveness in Life

According to Kreiss, through the Allergy of the cave, the allergy is presented as the sense in which we reveal our world, yet it is actually not exactly that, rather, an intellectual approach can comprehensively [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 664

Existentialism of the 20th Century

They argued that human beings are actors in the world and hence are aware of what is in it unlike the trees and stones that just exist.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1114

Hobbes’ Contribution to Establishment of Civil Peace

Hobbes believed that his contribution to the establishment of civil peace succeeded while those of others failed. Hobbes thought that education was the answer to some form of human conflict.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1795

Philosophical View on the Process of Education

Any human being has the ability to think and as a result of this gift which is not in animals, he/she is able to reason, for example, a five-year-old girl who made her toy to [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 567

The Problem of the External World

This great thinker had conducted a research on the issue and stood on the idea of physical inexistence due to the fact that is clearly detailed in his Meditations, in which he sought to establish [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 987

Who Is Qualified to Survive?

The fertility of women is at its peak in the late teens and the early twenties, therefore in terms of reproduction; it is reasonable to suppose that Mary Evans is in her prime and will [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1111

Nature Versus Nurture Argument

I believe that the nature versus nurture argument is very complex and tries to define which of the two is more dominant in people.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 852

Falsifiability: Scientific Concept

This is due to the fact that the idea can be proved whether it is false by observation or conducting an experiment.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1179

Plato’s Meno: Philosophical Dialogue

The discussion begins by Meno asking Socrates whether there is a definition of the word 'Arete' because he thinks that it cannot be taught in class because there is apparently no definition of the word.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1031

Humanities: Definition and Types

This essay gives a definition of humanities and the difference between humanities and other modes of human inquiry and expression. Sometimes the walls and doors are made of glass.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 726

Was Seneca a Tyrant-Trainer?

When upbringing Nero, Seneca from the point of view of the time solves a problem which was in the centre of attention of the Roman thinkers since Cicero in the new way a problem of [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1408

Nature and Convention Relation

For harmony to prevail, human beings have to live in accordance to the two kinds of order; that is nature and convention.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1124

Beach: A Review of the Term

All in all, the mention of the term 'beach' invokes images of serenity and exquisite joy in the minds of people.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 489

Love: A Review of the Term

In effect, love, kin all its definitions, has the aspect of pleasure whereby the loving party senses happiness regarding the object of their love.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 504

The Philosophers Bergson and Aristophanes

It is possible to sum up that what interested the philosopher most of all were two things: the first one was finding the core of different matters, and the second thing was to learn the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1793

Marxist’s Views on Industrial Revolution

Based on this, Karl Marx stated that the products produced by the communally owned means of production should be divided equally to avoid classes and ranks in societies.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1541

Medieval Philosophy of Plato

The description of the existence of universals in a domain that is devoid of time and space gives universals an extra-ordinary picture.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 902

Herbert Spencer and Emile Durkheim: Comparison

Although he agreed that wrongdoers in the society were supposed to be punished, he did not agree with Spencer that this punishment was supposed to be meted on the poor and defenseless in the society.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 9
  • Words: 2580

Studying Theory of Knowledge in Epistemology

How do we see our world because much of our knowledge does not come as results of our senses but through perception of things that around us in this physical world and."The experience in this [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 8
  • Words: 2165

The Meaning of the Natural Law

When we mislead people with our words, we are applying the words contrary to their appropriate purpose and it is against the theory of the natural law.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 731

Immanuel Kant’s Theory of Knowledge

Basing on this statement, therefore, empirialists have to carry out a rigorous test to determine the relationship between the decisions that individuals make, and the prior knowledge affecting the decisions making.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 944

The Theory of Knowledge by Immanuel Kant

Main Kant's idea was in the necessity of both reason and experience for human beings. In his opinion, Synthetic judgments are opposite to analytic and are not sufficient to decide the importance of proposition.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 546

Descartes and Existance of God: Thoughts in a Jar

This is where he manages to convince himself that the only reasonable explanation for "the perfect idea of perfection" is God: By the name of God I understand a substance that is infinite, independent, all-knowing, [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 691

Theodicy and the Problem of Evil

However, what perhaps relates to the issue at hand is when, in the Book of Genesis, God created enmity between the woman's offspring and that of the serpent.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 815

H. D. Thoreau: Unacknowledged Genius Who Stayed Hermit

A naturalist against science; an idealist with all the "faculty" of a whittling Yankee; a free-thinking Puritan; a Stoic who sucked sweetness out of all his sensations; a paradox from beginning to end: such was [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1230

Leadership Styles in Chinese Philosophy

These leaders; 'should always be in a position to know which is the right time to talk, when to pause and the time to be silent, and lastly the time to act.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 588

Martin Buber: Two Types of Faith

The first type of faith is expressed in the continuity of the nation which one is born in and he is a member.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 570

Philosophical Theories in Politics

In the face of a crisis, the government has two alternatives either to let the rules of demand and supply take care of the situation or to inject these vast sums of capital to stimulate [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1791

Philosophy as a Multi-Faceted Subject

It is the understanding of the general and crucial issues related to existence of human beings and other creatures, values, reasoning and the general functioning of the mind."Philosophy as a term originates from the Greek [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 951

Subjectivism vs. Naturalism

The definition of naturalism is very useful as it is "the philosophical generalization of science," with its different forms determined by the method and content of the sciences.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 7
  • Words: 1950

Plato and Socrates: Differences in Personal Philosophy

The question that enters my mind when I read the Republic is in regards to the fact that Plato considers education to be the defining act that separates those who do not know from those [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1403

Main Branches of Philosophy

This is the study of value that surpasses the ability of a man to reason over the universe and its state on the whole.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 966

The Problem of the Evil and Philosophy of Religion

John Hick, the author of Evil and the God of Love, insists on the idea that theodicy is "unavoidable...in the virtue of the nature that the world and of the essential character of the Christian [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 573

The Main Branches of Philosophy

The first main branch within the field of philosophy is the concept of human nature which is the pursuit to improve the interdisciplinary exploration of the social, environmental and biological factors and variations of the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1247

Physicalism as a Philosophical Approach

There is nothing in my version of the psychometric hypothesis to indicate that the determinateness of reality would be impaired by the absence of things such as ourselves.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1494

Portrait of an Ideal World by Henry Louis Mencken

As a result, corruption in the police force and crime levels soared in such an alarming rate that the justice and prison systems became overwhelmed by the level of cases they had to deal with [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1126

Philosophy of Religion. Mysticism and Evidence

The example of Kabir is suitable here."It would follow that there are two kinds of religion: the genuine religion of the mystics and the secondhand religion of the rest of mankind".
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 586

Ancient Philosophy. Aristotle and Seneca on Anger

Though there are conditions when anger is beneficial and useful, such as the feeling of anger that inspires the soldiers to fight abandoning hesitation and fear, Aristotle believes that the emotion of anger is constantly [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 970

Daniel Dennett’s Theory of Mental States

David Armstrong rejected the theory developed by Dennett for a number of reasons; he supported the position of materialists, stressing that mental states are parts of the physical body.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 804

Sexuality and Personal Identity Deployment by Foucault

Thesis Statement: Foucault suggests that the "deployment" of sexuality is closely connected with the deployment of integrity, which is the main principle of the social and political welfare of the state.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1876

Politics and Ethics in Plato’s Republic

After the Peloponnesian war, he was convinced by his uncle to join the oligarchical rules of Athens but as an alternative, he joined his two brothers in becoming a student of Socrates.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1288

Descartes’s Argument for Dualism and Arnauld’s Response

Being one of the enlightened persons of his time, Descartes related one of his arguments to the triangle. Actually, this argument contradicts the argument of Descartes that the self is distinct from one's body and [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 836

“The Dawn of Man” and “The Allegory of the Cave”

The Dawn of Man and The Allegory of the cave are going to be compared and discussed from the point of view of identical positions and man's perception development which may be seen there.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 567

The Science and the Scientific Work

In the work The Scientific Life, Shapin writes: "The scientist was properly to be understood not on the model of the philosopher but on the model of the engineer and technician".
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Science
  • Pages: 12
  • Words: 3580

Plato, Aristotle and Socrates: Knowledge and Government

It appears that Socrates believed in an intellectual aristocracy, where those who had more education and had proven themselves in sophistry the "Socratic method" of exchange and analysis of ideas as a path to all [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 264

John Locke View Regarding Religion and Science

Some of the denominations that were in conflict were the Protestants, the Anglicans and the Catholics. The offers were short from over when he received that of being the Commissioner of Appeal and that of [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 10
  • Words: 3014

“Merit: Why do We Value it?” by Louis Pojman

The ways of the modern world have deemed that virtue is to be rewarded and vice is to be punished. The standard of merit and how to apply it in a situation appears to be [...]
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 1414

Opposites From Opposites: The Conception

The question is that life is realized by people through the principle of cut and try. It is better to say here that it is a warning for those contradicting nature and physical reality of [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 564

Skepticism is a Philosophical Doctrine

One of the most compelling arguments for skepticism about the external world concerns the existence of material objects; this argument can be considered with regards to qualitative illusion, the reality of these objects, and the [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 830

Judaism: Religious Beliefs Evolution

Judaism is the religious beliefs and the way of life of the Jews, that started as the faith of the early Hebrews.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 565

“War and Innocence” by Robert Fullinwinder

In the closing part of the article, the researcher concludes that absent of self-defense should be compensated by the introduction of the legal conventions justifying killing in war.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 553

Two Attitudes Toward Money

Two attitudes toward money involve negative perception of money as universal evil and positive perception of money as source of good life and prosperity.
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 846

Friedrich Nietzsche’s Relationship to Religion

Nietzsche considered that modern values and morals mattered more to humans, and propagated the belief that ultimately it is the will power of people and their natural self that will lead them towards happiness rather [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 845

“The Subject and Power” by Michel Foucault

Unlike the older versions of power which, although they did include modern thinking, like feminism, always argued that power was only for a dominant group in society, Foucault believes that it is quite silly to [...]
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 6
  • Words: 1657

Blaise Pascal: The Question of God’s Existence

And if people do not have strong arguments that can support his or her idea it is better not to come into debate."The right thing is not to wager at all".
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 571

Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and Robert Owen: Time Travel

Smith, a pioneer of political economy, would be interested in analyzing the current economic situation in the country and, perhaps, even suggest ways for the country to overcome the economic crisis.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1129

Comparing Kant and Kierkegaard

Kierkegaard uses the example of the New Testament story of Christ's raising of Lazarus from the dead to argue that while the human body dies, the spirit lives on and thus it is not fear [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 863

Divine Command Theory Definition

Moving the discussion further, Socrates makes Euthyphro give another definition of piety, and Euthyphro states, probably at a loss, that pious are the things loved by gods, and impious are the things hated by gods.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 554

“Who Governs?” by Robert Dahl

The book "Who Governs?" by Robert Dahl analyzes and evaluates the role of the political elite in city government and the impact on interest groups and community power of governance.
  • Subjects: Political Philosophies
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1650

How Does Hypothetical and Categorical Imperatives Differ?

A hypothetical imperative is conditional with command applied to us at our will and the end of it is willed while categorical imperative is unconditional where our will is exercised in a particular manner with [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 701

Aspects of Justice in Plato’s Republic

Or to put it the other way around: For the moneymaking, auxiliary, and guardian classes each to do its own work in the city is the opposite.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 7
  • Words: 2140

The Definition of Universal Justice

Thesis: Sanders in his "Doing Time in the Thirteenth Chair" expresses that justice cannot be achieved by means of a mere discussion of existing evidence and questions the procedures which usually take place during the [...]
  • Subjects: Life Philosophy
  • Pages: 4
  • Words: 1414

Analytic Philosophy: The Views by Wittgenstein and Aye

At the same time, analytic truth is viewed by Wittgenstein as an explanation of the truthfulness of the logical one. At the same time, the necessary truth is compared and affiliated with the logical one [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 597

Greek Philosophy and Culture: Contributions to Western Society

I believe that any real look into the Ancient Greeks should include some of this information to illustrate that they were not just about politics and ethics, but that different groups were interested in different [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 632

Confucianism and Daoism: The Vision of Life

The contribution of the Zhou dynasty is invaluable and the most visible. According to Daoism people should live in harmony with nature and the whole world.
  • Subjects: Philosophy of Religion
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 603

Kantian Moral Theory in a Nutshell

In order to explain his argument, it is also necessary to look at the notion of will the philosophers presents: the will refers to human ability to act according to certain principles or laws, and [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 823

Rene Descartes: A Brief Perspective

However, as any numerologist would predict, born on the 31st of the month, a number 4, destined Descartes to search for the esoteric and the 'opposing' point of view.
  • Subjects: Philosophers
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 515

Cloning: Ethical Questions

The discovery of DNA and its role in predetermining the physical and mental subtleties of one's existence, allowed us to realize that it is now only a matter of time before we are going to [...]
  • Subjects: Ethical Philosophy
  • Pages: 10
  • Words: 3142

“Out of Our Heads” by Alva Noe, Analysis of Ideas

The book abounds in controversies, for instance, the author makes use of the process of dreaming to show that the work of the brain alone is not sufficient for the creation of consciousness.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Works
  • Pages: 5
  • Words: 1555

Associationist Theories of Thought

The first doctrine is that the more recondite phenomena of the mind are formed out of simple parts. Associationism is the theory of psychology explaining the connection between thoughts and past experiences.
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 3
  • Words: 893

What is the Socratic Method?

The Socratic Method is also referred to as the Method of Elenchus or the Socratic Debate. It was after his friend from youth Chaerpon paid a visit to the Oracle of Delphi and deemed Socrates [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Theories
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 547

The Truth About Life Analysis

On the other hand it is essential to know of the highest goals of humanity in terms of what leads to ultimate fulfillment in life and the quest of human beings is to engage in [...]
  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept
  • Pages: 2
  • Words: 562