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Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes Research Paper

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Updated: Apr 13th, 2022

Introduction

There is a trend in most schools where children as young as 13 have problems with their memory. A recent case was reported of a young man who was unable to continue with his education due to serious brain damage. The most likely cause for this condition is concussion. Young athletes are always under threat of suffering from these injuries as a result of their active participation in sports.

Purpose of the Study

The major objective of this study is to analyze the issue of how young athletes are the most affected when it comes to concussions. The specific objectives are as follows:

  • To establish the link between age and brain damage.
  • To establish the preventive initiatives among athletes
  • To outline the effects of concussions to young athletes
  • To recommend better healthcare management among athletes.

The sporting world is largely populated by young men and women. The youth have the anatomy and energy needed to undertake such strenuous activities. Unfortunately, it is noted that the pomp of the sporting culture comes with a certain amount of risk to the athletes involved. The performance of these individuals, for instance, is dependent on their health status and wellbeing. Their undertakings in sporting activities also have various impacts on their physical health. To this end, health hazards like concussions are some of the risks involved in sporting activities. According to Buzzini and Guskiewicz (2006), there is an increase in the number of concussions cases among athletes.

Importance of the Subject

The current research paper revolves around this issue of concussions among young athletes. The undertaking is prompted by the numerous findings from various peer reviewed studies (Nesmith, 2010). According to Lovell et al. (2003), children as young as those in high school suffer from concussions due to their athletic activities. The current study will describe concussions with respect to this group. In addition, the study will illustrate how schools and sporting institutions can reduce this condition among young athletes.

Thesis statement

The study will be guided by the following thesis statement:

The increase in the number of cases of concussions reported among young athletes is brought about by institutional failures.

A concussion is an injury that affects the normal functioning of the brain. According to Patel, Vandashana, and Baker (2005), it occurs when an individual encounters a blow or an impact to their head. In the case of athletes, the condition arises when they hit a hard surface. Instances of concussions can emerge in cases where one is still conscious. Such a situation requires attention from the relevant sporting authorities. Patel et al. (2005) hold the view that sport related injuries, such as concussions, are some of the most common clinical cases in the sporting world. Athletes of an adolescent age are at risk of failure in the neuro-cognitive development of their brains. Patel et al. (2005) argue that at the ages of 12-15 years, an individual is still undergoing brain development. To this end, an athlete of a similar age is at risk of brain damage due to concussions.

The problem can be solved through interventions from the various stakeholders in the sporting arena. One of the interventions includes equipping the athletes with safety equipment. The helmet reform will work since it is a simple but effective measure. Other alternatives include budgetary allocations and making safety central to decisions made by sport authorities.

Problem Analysis

Background

The neural health of young athletes is always at risk. Reports indicate that there is a spike in the number of concussion cases among athletes, especially in the American football sport. According to Lovell et al. (2003), mild concussions among high school children are a contributing factor to memory lapses.

A concussion can only be diagnosed by the symptoms presented by the individual. According to McCrea, Hammeke, Olsen, Leo, and Guskiewicz (2004), concussions are difficult to diagnose since they vary between individuals. McCrea et al. (2004) argue that the condition can go undetected for several days after an injury. Consequently, extreme medical care is necessary to help ascertain whether an individual has a concussion or not (Buzzini & Guskiewicz, 2006).

A study by Patridge and Hall (2014) evaluates some of the advancements made in the management of concussions. Patridge and Hall (2014) argue that difficulties in the diagnosis of the medical condition call for the application of advanced techniques. A similar opinion is held by Patel et al. (2005). According to Patel et al. (2005), brain analysis is needed to establish the damage caused by the condition. In this regard, Patridge and Hall (2014) recommend the use of neuropsychological tests in the diagnosis.

Causes of Concussions

Concussions are caused by injuries to the brain. The injuries are brought about by impacts on the head. According to Lovell et al. (2003), concussions have a direct impact on the health status of the brain. Patel et al. (2005) found that the injuries can lead to memory losses among young adolescent athletes. For instance, during ice hockey, a player can get hit on the head with a puck. The resultant impact is transferred to the brain. Considering the delicate nature of this organ, physiological functions can be greatly affected.

Effects of Concussions

The effects of concussions can be determined based on the existing symptoms. Some of the most common signs include headaches, confusion, and balance problems. Lovell et al. (2003) found that some athletes diagnosed with a concussion experienced blurry or double vision and sleep problems. Patel et al. (2005) found that some athletes suffered from depression. Patel et al. (2005) argue that nausea, memory loss, and a sluggish feeling are some other symptoms exhibited by concussion patients.

Concussion among young athletes
Figure 1: Concussion among young athletes

Figure 1 illustrates sporting activities that lead to concussions among young athletes. The brutal nature of some of these sporting endeavors results in physical injuries. Consequently, protective gear is necessary.

Solution

Overview

To minimize concussions among young athletes, authorities should invest in high quality safety equipment. A comprehensive insurance cover for the individuals is also recommended. Lovell et al. (2003) argue that teenage athletes experienced concussions due to the use of faulty equipment. McCrea et al. (2004) observe that while teenagers are at high risk of sustaining head injuries, older athletes also exhibit symptoms of concussions. In both cases, high quality equipment will reduce the problem. The best solution would be to increase budgetary allocations for the acquisition of better sporting tools.

The Helmet Reform

As previously mentioned, the age of an athlete determines the probability and effects of a concussion. Patel et al. (2005) argue that an evaluation of diagnostic procedures for concussion depends on age set. Patel et al. (2005) analyze how neuropsychological performance compares to the usual test performance with respect to the diagnosis of concussions. The findings indicate severity of brain damage among adolescent athletes. In light of this, there is a need to introduce quality helmets in sports like football and ice hockey.

The brain of a young individual develops up to the time they get to the age of 15. According to McLeod et al. (2004), most athletes in hockey and football are teenagers. A survey carried out by Kent (and cited in Patel et al., 2005) found that adolescents experience the most injuries when hit on the head. Considering the developmental stages of their brains, adolescent athletes face the highest risk of sustaining concussions. To this end, McLeod et al. (2004) advocate for the use of a Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Such a technique is crucial in repairing the damage done to young athletes in the event of a concussion.

A possible solution to the high cases of concussions entails improving healthcare systems within the sporting industry. Young athletes should be provided with protection. To this end, the quality of helmets worn during sporting tournaments should be reviewed (Patel et al., 2005).

Distinguishing Factor

Some sporting associations neglect protective measures when dealing with young athletes. The research by Patel et al. (2005) found that schools are not doing enough to manage the healthcare of their athletes. The helmet reform will ensure that all athletes are fitted with the necessary gear and provided with insurance cover.

There have been previous attempts to reform the healthcare systems for athletes. According to Lovell et al. (2003), lobby groups have come up with various initiatives to deal with the rising cases of concussions. However, McLeod et al. (2004) point out that sporting agencies lack the goodwill to implement these reforms. For instance, athletes taking part in games where participants come into sharp contact with each other are required to put on protective gear. Failure to wear high quality safety equipment is not taken seriously in some instances. The solution proposed will be legally binding. The helmet suppliers will be bound to provide medical cover in the event that a young athlete experiences concussion

There are two main deliverables in this study. The first involves quality assurance. McLeod et al. (2004) argue that lack of proper quality assurance mechanisms negatively affects safety in sporting. Secondly, there needs to be systems in place to ensure that only certified kits are used in sporting activities.

Benefits

The benefits of using quality equipment in sport are many. According to Patridge and Hall (2014), brain damage among athletes can be drastically reduced if the participants adopt the culture of using the proper safety equipment. From the literature review conducted in this research, it is apparent that adolescents sustain the most injuries when they receive a severe impact to the head. The study by Patel et al. (2005) adds more substance to the subject. Consequently, adolescent athletes are the individuals who are at high risk when it comes to suffering from concussions. The proposed solution will encourage more individuals to take part in sports given the guarantee on their safety.

Implementation of quality standards in sports will ensure that brain damage among athletes is reduced. Lovell et al. (2003) establish that mood swings and insomnia are the common symptoms associated with this condition. The findings are supported by McCrea et al. (2004), who observe that age is an integral factor with regards to the severity of concussions. The use of certified safety equipment will address this problem and enhance the sporting culture.

The literature review revealed that both teenagers and older athletes are at risk of suffering from concussions. However, a comparison between the two age groups found that younger athletes were affected more by the condition than their older counterparts. As previously mentioned, the age of an athlete determines the extent and effects of a concussion. Patel et al. (2005) support this position by arguing that the brain activity of young athletes is at constant threat. It is one of the reasons why they suffer the most from concussions.

A cost-benefit analysis of the proposed solution reveals that it is viable. The figure below supports this position:

Cost benefit analysis of the proposed solution
Figure 2: Cost benefit analysis of the proposed solution

The chart illustrates the cost of the current sporting budget for a model school in millions of dollars. The operating costs will continue to go high unless proper measures are put in place to minimize concussions among the athletes. The proposed budget will see a huge reduction in the cost of treatment. Consequently, a reduction in operating costs will be witnessed in the five year plan proposed.

Conclusion

In this study, the author found out that cases of concussions are common among young athletes. It was also found that it is important to address this problem to safeguard the health of the youthful individuals. The author challenges sporting agencies and other stakeholders involved in this industry to be more proactive in dealing with cases of concussions among the youth. It is important to safeguard the health of these individuals by improving the medical services provided to them during sports.

A number of studies in this field have come up with similar recommendations. For example, McLeod et al. (2004) concluded their study with a reminder of the missing links that require additional research in efforts to address the problem of concussions among athletes. To this effect, it is important to evaluate whether or not institutional failure is to blame for the rising cases of concussions among young sports persons.

References

Buzzini, S., & Guskiewicz, K. (2006). Sport-related concussion in the young athlete. Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 18(4), 376-382.

Lovell, M., Collins, M., Grant, I., Field, M., Maroon, J., Cantu, R.,…Fu, H. (2003). Recovery from mild concussion in high school athletes. Journal of Neurosurgery, 98(2), 296-301.

McCrea, M., Hammeke, T., Olsen, G., Leo, P., & Guskiewicz, K. (2004). Unreported concussion in high school football players: Implications for prevention. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 14(1), 13-17.

McLeod, T., Perrin, D., Guskiewicz, K., Shultz, S., Diamond, R., & Gansneder, B. (2004). Serial administration for clinical concussion assessments and learning effects in healthy young athletes. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 14, 287-295.

Nesmith, J. (2010). Sports concussion in the child and adolescent athlete. Journal of the Arkansas Medical Society, 107(6), 111-114.

Patel, D., Vandashana, S., & Baker, R. (2005). Management of sports related concussion in young athletes. Sports Medicine, 35(8), 671-684.

Patridge, B., & Hall, W. (2014). Conflicts of interest in recommendations to use computerized neuropsychological tests to manage concussion in professional football codes. Neuroethics, 7(1), 63-74.

An Evaluation of Concussions among Young Athletes

First Draft

Narrowed Topic

The study focuses on the rising cases of concussions among young athletes. As previously mentioned, the sporting culture is largely populated by young men and women. The youth have the anatomy and energy for such strenuous activities. Unfortunately, the pomp of the sporting culture comes with a certain amount of risk. The performance of athletes, for instance, is dependent on their health status. To this end, health hazards like concussions are some of the risks involved in a sporting activity. According to Buzzini and Guskiewicz (2006), there is an increase in the number of concussions cases among athletes. In this regard, the current proposal a research on current study is prompted by the numerous findings from various peer reviewed studies.

Audience

The primary audience is sporting organizations and schools. The same is driven by the fact that brain development is at threat among young athletes. The rise in such cases is prompted by the fact that athletes deserve protective gear to minimize the chances of brain injury due to concussions. The short coming in this respect is that, there are some sporting associations that neglect such protective measures. The research initiative carried out by Patel et al. (2005) found that schools are not doing their best to manage the healthcare of their athletes.

To this end, the audience stands to benefit from the information on treatment. The study will be evaluating concussions among young athletes. To this end, the target audience will be college administrators and athletes. Patel et al. (2005) argue that institutions are the best audience for similar studies. The same allows for comprehensive policy development.

Thesis Statement

The study will be evaluated based on the thesis statement that, “the rise of the concussions culture is brought about by institutional failures”. The study will evaluate young athletes who are in danger with respect to the status of their brain activity. According to Lovell et al. (2003), mild concussions among high school children were found to be a contributing factor for their memory lapses. In this regard, the thesis statement will seek to synthesize the information around this subject

Topic Sentences

Introduction

A concussion is an injury that affects the normal functioning of an individual’s brain. According to Patel et al. (2005), a concussion is brought about when an individual encounters a huge blow or impact to their head. In the case of athletes, concussions result when they hit a hard surface. Patel et al. (2005) point out that concussions can emerge in cases when one still has their consciousness. Such a situation requires serious attentions from the relevant sporting authorities.

Body

The study will evaluate the thesis statement and affirm the sentiments based on the discussion. The conclusion will avoid repetition by outlining the necessary recommendation.

The problem statement will be solved using an analytical research design. The study will adopt an exploratory and descriptive research approach. An exploratory approach helps the researcher to add the necessary information around a subject. As previously mentioned, cases of concussions have been studied extensively. To this end, there is no need for a quantitative research design. A qualitative design will be adopted for this study to hasten the research process. The study will rely on secondary sources of data. In this regard, peer reviewed articles will be the major source of the secondary data.

Annotated Bibliography

Buzzini, S., & Guskiewicz, K. (2006). Sport-related concussion in the young athlete. Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 18(4), 376-382.

Summary: The study provides a general overview of concussions among young athletes. Buzzini and Guskiewicz (2006) use their research to carry out a review of various studies touching on the subject. The study found that young athletes are the ones most affected by concussions. However, the study points out most aged athletes are unable to withstand the effects of concussion.

Assessment: The problem statement of the research paper underpins the need for a comprehensive approach towards protecting young athletes from the dangers of concussions. To this end, the study by Buzzini and Guskiewicz (2006) is essential in advancing the thesis statement. In the first instance, it will be used to outline the link between age and susceptibility to concussions. Secondly, the source will provide a rationale for proper healthcare management for young athletes.

McCrea, M., Hammeke, T., Olsen, G., Leo, P., & Guskiewicz, K. (2004). Unreported concussion in high school football players: Implications for prevention. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 14(1), 13-17.

Summary: The study affirms the possibility of unreported cases of concussion within school settings. McCrea et al. (2004) point out that high school football is a tradition in America. To this end, good players tend to be over-exploited even when injured. The study evaluates the implications of this undertaking and preventive mechanisms. McCrea et al. (2004) support the sentiment that an athlete can suffer a concussion but the effects remain concealed.

Assessment: In the introductory section, details touching on the symptoms of concussion are evaluated. According to McCrea et al. (2004), most unreported cases are due to the fact that the athletes fail to exhibit the common symptoms. In this regard, the source will be very essential in encouraging comprehensive screening processes.

Nesmith, J. (2010). Sports concussion in the child and adolescent athlete. Journal of the Arkansas Medical Society, 107(6), 111-114.

Summary: The study evaluates concussions among teenagers. To this end, Nesmith (2010) supports the view that many cases of concussions are reported among adolescent athletes. The study sheds more light on the seriousness behind the condition. Nesmith (2010) argues that previously, concussions were not seen as a major issue. However, the findings suggest that the situation is a serious medical condition among young athletes. One of the reasons is that the young athletes have a slower recovery period. The findings from this study will help stakeholders improve on the existing safety conditions for athletes.

Analysis: The selection of this source is relevant with respect to the healthcare of athletes. In this regard, the best recovery techniques are outlined (Nesmith, 2010). The source will help develop the necessary criteria for administering medical care to injured athletes. To this end, the source will be applied uniformly across the study.

Lovell, M., Collins, M., Grant, I., Field, M., Maroon, J., Cantu, R.,…Fu, H. (2003). Recovery from mild concussion in high school athletes. Journal of Neurosurgery, 98(2), 296-301.

Summary: The selection of this source is essential in evaluating diagnostic measures relating to concussions. Lovell et al. (2003) evaluate the recovery process among high school athletes. The study bases its discussion on the neuropsychological performance of an athlete’s brain. Lovell et al. (2003) use the study to illustrate advanced concussion diagnosis techniques. The diagnosis of concussion in this study is prompted by cases of patients who complained of memory dysfunction. Lovell et al. (2003) compare brain activity among high school students prior to a concussion against neuropsychological functions after the head injury.

The study evaluates diagnostic markers associated with concussions. Lovell et al. (2003) point out that the severity of the condition is dependent on the duration of the injury during the sporting activity. The study found that athletes with mild concussions exhibited a decline in their memory retention capabilities. Lovell et al. (2003) point out that the severity of the effects depends on the time taken before formal treatment commences.

Assessment: The relevance of this source is determined by the degree of credibility exhibited. Lovell et al. (2003) discuss their research from the perspective of high school students. The credibility of a study is determined by the use of peer reviewed articles. The study by Lovell (2003) has a comprehensive literature review, which discusses the effects of concussions among young athletes. The crux of the current study is the increase in the number of concussion cases among young athletes. The selection of this source supports the thesis statement by providing a link between age and severity of concussions.

McLeod, T., Perrin, D., Guskiewicz, K., Shultz, S., Diamond, R., & Gansneder, B. (2004). Serial administration for clinical concussion assessments and learning effects in healthy young athletes. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 14, 287-295.

Summary: The study provides an analysis of the treatment criteria for patients who exhibit concussions. McLeod et al. (2004) introduce the Standardized Assessment of Concussion and Balance Error Scoring System. The two are avenues that can be used to evaluate the diagnosis techniques for concussion. The credibility of this source is supported by the fact that it adopts a qualitative and quantitative research method.

Assessment: The study makes use of a target group as the source of the primary data. The current project will not have a group of participants. To this end, McLeod et al. (2004) provide a general idea about the specific design to use in similar studies. Studies that rely on secondary data should include statistical information from studies with such indications. In this regard, the information contained in this source will help to advance information on the treatment options for athletes who have suffered from concussions. The findings suggest that the Balance Error Scoring System is the best treatment initiative for concussions.

Patel, D., Vandashana, S., & Baker, R. (2005). Management of sports related concussion in young athletes. Sports Medicine, 35(8), 671-684.

Summary: The study by Patel et al. (2005) is an evaluation of how sports related concussions can be managed at a clinical level. In the article, Patel et al. (2005) affirm that head injuries are the most common clinical cases with respect to sporting activities. The study localizes the cause of most head injuries to the American Football sport. Understandably, the players are the most at risk of getting concussions given the rough impact characterized by the sport.

The choice of this particular source emerges from the fact that it discusses the age through which the brain continues to develop. Patel et al. (2005) argue that young athletes are part of the age group where the brain is subject to physical and psychological growth and development. In this regard, the study is a credible authority in evaluating the management of concussion among young athletes.

Assessment: The selection of this source is brought about by the sentiments shared in the thesis statement. In the first section of the study, the working thesis statement suggests that “the rise of the concussions culture is brought about by institutional failures”. In this regard, the source will help to outline the healthcare management role that is meant to be played by various sporting institutions.

The study by Patel et al. (2005) finds applicability in the current project based on the concussion management techniques discussed. Information obtained from this source will be used to outline some essential information about concussions. Patel et al. (2005), discusses some elements similar to the current problem statement. For instance, symptoms and diagnostic measures are discussed (Patel et al., 2005). The source will be used uniformly across the project. The source will be important in developing a conclusion for the study. A number of guidelines are outlined with respect to concussion management. The guidelines will help identify the shortcomings of various sporting institutions when it comes to managing concussions among young athletes.

Patridge, B., & Hall, W. (2014). Conflicts of interest in recommendations to use computerized neuropsychological tests to manage concussion in professional football codes. Neuroethics, 7(1), 63-74.

Summary: The study reaffirms the fact that head injury poses a potential risk to the normal functioning of the brain. Patridge and Hall (2014) evaluate the conflicts of interests that present themselves in cases where the management of concussion is necessary. A number of ethical issues often arise when it comes to the management of concussion. The study illustrates a number of examples where such conflicts of interests arise. To this end, the information will be beneficial in developing a proper treatment plan for patients with concussions.

Assessment: The relevance of this source is seen in the recommendations made with respect to policies used in dealing with concussions. Patridge and Hall (2014) argue sporting agencies require building consensus on the policy to be used for healthcare management with respect to concussions. In this regard, the source will help add the relevant information in developing proper treatment techniques for concussions. The source will be used in the conclusion. The information will help add value to the study.

An Evaluation of Concussions among Young Athletes

Introduction

The sporting culture is largely populated by young men and women. The youth have the anatomy and energy for such strenuous activities. Unfortunately, the pomp of the sporting culture comes with a certain amount of risk. The performance of athletes, for instance, is dependent on their health status. To this end, health hazards like concussions are some of the risks involved in a sporting activity. According to Buzzini and Guskiewicz (2006), there is an increase in the number of concussions cases among athletes. In this regard, the current proposal a research on current study is prompted by the numerous findings from various peer reviewed studies.

An article, appearing in the Journal of Neurosurgery illustrates that children as young as the high school age suffer from concussions due to their athletic activities (Lovell et al., 2003). In this regard, the study will describe concussions with respect to their. In addition, the study will illustrate some instances where young athletes account for a significant number of the reported concussion cases.

Topic

A concussion is an injury that affects the normal functioning of an individual’s brain. According to Patel et al. (2005), a concussion is brought about when an individual encounters a huge blow or impact to their head. In the case of athletes, concussions result when they hit a hard surface. Patel et al. (2005) point out that concussions can emerge in cases when one still has their consciousness. Such a situation requires serious attentions from the relevant sporting authorities.

As previously mentioned, concussions are common among sporting professionals. The study by Patel et al. (2005) supports this opinion. Patel et al. (2005) hold the view that sport related injuries, like concussions, are some of the most common clinical cases. Athletes of an adolescent age are at risk of failure in the neuro-cognitive development of their brains. Patel et al. (2005) argue that at the ages of 12-15 years, an individual is still undergoing brain development. To this end, an athlete of a similar age is at risk of brain damage due to concussions.

Context

Young athletes are in danger with respect to their neural health. There are a number of studies which illustrate a spike in the number of concussion cases reported among athletes, especially in the American Football sport. According to Lovell et al. (2003), mild concussions among high school children were found to be a contributing factor for their memory lapses. In this regard, the study will be evaluated based on the thesis statement that, “the rise of the concussions culture is brought about by institutional failures”.

Objectives and Research Questions

The major objective of this study will be to ascertain the fact that young athletes are the individuals most affected by concussions. The study Patel et al. (2005) outlines the need for proper healthcare management systems. In this regard, the specific objectives of the study will be as follows:

  1. To establish the link between age and brain damage.
  2. To establish the preventive initiatives among athletes
  3. To outline the effects of concussions to young athletes
  4. To recommend better healthcare management among athletes.

The objectives outlined will be a response to the following research questions:

  1. What is a concussion?
  2. Is there a link between age and concussion cases among athletes?
  3. Are there mechanisms in place to prevent or minimize the effects of concussions among athletes?
  4. What are the effects of concussions to a young athlete?
  5. What are some of the ways in which concussion cases can be managed among athletes?

Research Method

The study will adopt an exploratory and descriptive research approach. An exploratory approach helps a study to add the necessary information around a subject. As previously mentioned, cases of concussions have been studied extensively. To this end, there is no need for a quantitative research design. A qualitative design will be adopted for this study to hasten the research process. The study will rely on secondary sources of data. In this regard, peer reviewed articles will be the major source of the secondary data.

Audience

The study will be evaluating concussions among young athletes. To this end, the target audience will be college administrators and athletes. Patel et al. (2005) argue that institutions are the best audience for similar studies. The same allows for comprehensive policy development.

Evidence

The literature review will act as an extension of the background information, in chapter one. The section will to respond to the research questions posed. As mentioned earlier, Patel et al. (2005) cites concussion cases among adolescents. The literature review will provide the necessary information required to address the objectives of the study.

Information Gathered So Far

Concussion

A concussion, as already mentioned, is a brain injury. According to Lovell et al. (2003), concussions have a direct impact on the health status of the brain. The study by Patel et al. (2005) found that concussions can lead to memory losses among young adolescent athletes. For instance, in the game of ice hockey, a player can get hit on the head with a puck. The resultant impact is transferred to the brain. Considering the delicate nature of the brain, physiological functions can be greatly impeded.

A concussion is similar to other clinical cases which can only be diagnosed by the symptoms that present themselves. According to McCrea et al. (2004), concussions can be difficult to diagnose since they can vary from person to person. McCrea et al. (2004) point out that, concussions can fail to be noticed several days after an injury. To this end, extreme medical care is necessary to help ascertain whether an individual has a concussion or not.

The study by Patridge and Hall (2014) evaluated some of the advancements being made with respect to the management of concussions. Patridge and Hall (2014) argue that the difficulty in diagnosing the medical condition calls for advanced techniques. A similar position was held by Patel et al. (2005). According to Patel et al. (2005), extensive brain analysis is needed to establish the damage caused by a concussion. In this regard, Patridge and Hall (2014) recommend the use of neuropsychological tests to diagnose concussions.

Some of the most common symptoms of a concussion include headaches, confusion and balance problems. The study by Lovell et al. (2003) found that a number of athletes who ended up being diagnosed with a concussion experienced blurry or double vision and sleep problems. Patel et al. (2005) found that some athletes ended up suffering from depression. In their study, Patel et al. (2005) found that nausea, memory loss, and a sluggish feeling were some of the symptoms that concussion patients exhibited.

Links between concussion and age among athletes

Various sporting fields require the presence of young athletes considering their physiological advantages. Lovell et al. (2003), while evaluating the diagnosis procedures on the patients, found that teenage athletes ended up developing mood swings and insomnia due to concussions. McCrea et al. (2004) observed that while teenagers were at risk from head injuries older athletes also exhibited the symptoms of concussions. However, a comparison between the two age groups found that younger athletes exhibited greater effects of concussions compared to the older athletes.

The age of an athlete determines the extent in which the effects of a concussion can occur. The study by Patel et al. (2005) supports this position. According to Patel et al. (2005), argues that an evaluation of diagnostic procedures for concussion are best realized by getting various age set. In the study, Patel et al. (2005) carry out an analysis of how the Neuropsychological performance compares to the usual test performance with respect to the diagnosis of concussions. The findings of the study indicate a severity of brain damage among adolescent athletes.

The brain of a young individual develops up to the time they get to the age of 15. According to McLeod et al. (2004), most athletes in hockey and football are teenagers. A survey carried out by Kent (and cited by Patel et al., 2005) found that adolescents experience the most injuries when hit on the head. Considering the developmental stages of their brains, adolescent athletes face the highest risk of facing concussions. In this regard McLeod et al. (2004) advocate for the use of a Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Such a technique is crucial in repairing the damage done to young athletes in the event of a concussion.

Information to be Gathered

Healthcare for athletes

As previously mentioned, the performance of athletes is dependent on their respective healthcare conditions. For instance, the study by McLeod et al. (2004) points out that athletes deserve protective gear to minimize the chances of brain injury due to concussions. Unfortunately, there are some sporting associations that neglect such protective measures. The research initiative carried out by Patel et al. (2005) found that schools are not doing their best to manage the healthcare of their athletes.

There are various regulations for athletes when it comes to matters pertaining to their healthcare. According to Lovell et al. (2003), there is a limited literature on the subject of athletes’ healthcare. However, McLeod et al. (2004) points out various sporting agencies have put in place measures to address the healthcare of athletes. For instance, games where participants come into sharp contact with each other are required to put on protective gear. To this end, policy frameworks have been out in place to ensure that the safety of the athletes is given top priority.

Findings and Discussion

Proposed Findings

The study objectives are meant to evaluate concussions among young athletes. According to Patridge and Hall (2014), brain damage among athletes varies depending on an individual’s age. From the literature review, it is apparent that adolescents experience the most injuries when faced with a sever hit to the head. The study by Patel et al. (2005), adds more substance to the subject. Consequently, adolescent athletes are the individuals who are most at risk when it comes to suffering concussions. The findings will be subjected to a comparative analysis.

Discussion

The discussions are necessary in identifying the missing links of a study. To this end, the current proposal seeks information from past studies by reviewing their findings. The proposal will help add information needed to recommend formulation of policies touching on matters to do with athletes and injuries. According to McLeod et al. (2004), the study aims at expanding the existing knowledge on matters touching on concussions.

Conclusion

The proposed study will come up with a number of recommendations with respect to concussions among young athletes. The concluding section of the study will restate its objectives. McLeod et al. (2004) concluded their study with a reminder of the missing links that require more research. To this effect, the proposed study will evaluate the findings and argue out whether institutional failure is to blame for the rising cases of concussions among young or athletes.

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IvyPanda. (2022, April 13). Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes. https://ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/

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IvyPanda. (2022, April 13). Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/

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"Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes." IvyPanda, 13 Apr. 2022, ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/.

1. IvyPanda. "Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes." April 13, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/.


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IvyPanda. "Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes." April 13, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/.

References

IvyPanda. 2022. "Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes." April 13, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/concussions-evaluation-among-young-athletes/.

References

IvyPanda. (2022) 'Concussions Evaluation Among Young Athletes'. 13 April.

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