Home > Free Essays > Sociology > Ethics > Ethics in the Case against Perfection
6 min
Cite This

Ethics in the Case against Perfection Essay

StarStarStarStarStar

Sandel deems that parents have a responsibility to support their children’s success. He acknowledges that they mutually do and overdo this through the use of orthodontics, Ritalin and in several other modes.

However, he questions if it is allowable and even venerable for parents to assist their children in these modes; why isn’t it similarly venerable for parents to employ whatever genetic technologies that may surface to improve their children’s outlook, athletic skill, aptitude or musical skill?

An upcoming set of liberal eugenicists deem that eugenic actions, for instance embryo selection, are inoffensive and may be morally essential provided that the benefits and saddles are fairly disseminated all over the society.

However, Sandel is not a liberal eugenicist as he thinks that eugenic parenting is offensive as it demonstrates a misinterpretation of our position in creation and baffles our responsibilities with that of God. This paper discusses the ethics behind all these issues.

To begin with, cloning is ethically wrong because it infringes the right to self-sufficiency; by selecting a child’s genetic composition beforehand, parents infringe the child’s privilege to a liberal future. On the other hand, Sandel deems that cloning is fine.

Although most scientists’ consent that cloning is dangerous as it can create offspring with severe deformities, Sandel asserts that technology can be enhanced to ascertain that clones are at no increased risk than physically conceived children. According to him, there is no trouble with making a child who is a hereditary twin of a single parent, or of a popular superstar.

Secondly, a sportsperson with genetically improved muscles, similar to a drug-enhanced sportsperson, would have an unjust benefit over his unenhanced opponents. One problem with drugs is that they make someone to win even when he or she has put no efforts.

However, Sandel argues that making effort is not the peak of sports but excellence. He further asserts that excellence is partially exhibited in the innate gifts and talents that are not determined by the sportsperson who owns them (Sandel 81). He regards this as a sore reality for democratic communities as folks like to assume that victory, in life and sports, is rather earned than innate.

Sandel further asserts that muscle improvement therapy should be utilized to enhance sport performance. He also argues that it is traditionally known that some sportsmen are far gifted hereditarily than others, and hitherto we do not deem this to demoralize the justice of competitive games.

From this perspective, Sandel concludes that improved genetic disparities would be no terrible than innate ones, supposing that they were harmless and made accessible to every one.

Besides, the ethics of memory enhancement point to the risk of producing two categories of people; those who have to survive with their natural abilities and those who can afford enhancement technologies. The predicament here is that in case these enhancements are transmitted across age groups, the two categories may finally become types of people, the improved and the purely natural.

However, concern on access disregards the ethical position of enhancement itself. The basic query here should not be how to guarantee the same access to enhancement but if we are supposed to seek it at first. Sandel deems that cognitive enhancement would span the stroke amid enhancement and remedy.

He moreover clarifies that this enhancement could have merely non-therapeutic uses: for instance, by a public prosecutor seeking to memorize details for an impending trial.

In addition, height enhancement is ethically wrong as it is jointly self-overpowering as several become taller while others turn out to be shorter than the custom. Typically, not all children can turn out to be above the customary height.

Since the unenhanced will begin to think that they are very short, they too may look for treatment, resulting to a hormonal warfare that will leave everybody shoddier, particularly those who are not capable of obtaining their way up from the tininess.

Conversely, Sandel feels that if we were worried merely by the unfairness of adding tininess to the troubles of the deprived, we could cure that injustice by publicly promoting height enhancements (86). Because of the comparative height deprivation experienced by innocent onlookers, he asserts that they could be remunerated by taxing those who purchase their means to bigger height.

Eventually, Sandel demands to know whether we would desire to exist in a world where parents feel obligated to use their money to make perfectly healthy children some inches taller.

Furthermore, embryonic selection is ethically wrong since an embryo is a human being and hence should not be screened. Considering that an eight-sect embryo developing in a Petri-dish is ethically equal to a wholly developed person, disposing it is no better than terminating a pregnancy and both actions are equal to infanticide.

However, Sandel supposes that if sex choice by sperm categorization is offensive, it should be for causes that go beyond the dispute about the ethical status of the embryo. He explains that one such cause is that sex assortment is a tool of sex bias, characteristically against young women, as demonstrated in China and India.

He further articulates that for those who think that communities with considerably fewer women than men will not be much stable, more aggressive, and more inclined to crime or conflict are not supposed to t do so since those are obvious qualms that the sperm-sorting firm takes care of.

Again, the morality of giftedness, under the cordon in sports continues in the role of parenting. Here, genetic enhancement and bioengineering is capable of extricating it. In fact, to value kids as gifts is to acknowledge them as they arrive, not as matters of our devise, objects of our wish or tools of our desire.

This is so because parental love is not dependent on the gifts and traits of a child. Though we may select our partners and friends depending on the traits we find striking, we do not select our kids. Their traits are impulsive, and even the most diligent parents cannot be held totally accountable for the type of kids they own.

Finally, genetic enhancements generally demoralize our civilization by intimidating our ability to act liberally, to thrive by our own hard work, and to deem ourselves liable, credible of praise or fault, for our own actions and status. Certainly, the functions of enhancement and endeavor will be an issue of extent.

However, as the function of enhancement augments, our appreciation for the accomplishment diminishes as our esteem for the attainment shifts from the performer to his doctor. This implies that our ethical reaction to enhancement is a comeback to the weakened agency of the individual whose success is enhanced.

However, Sandel does not believe the major setback with genetic engineering and enhancement and is that they demoralize effort and corrode human agency. Instead, he asserts that the profound risk is that they symbolize a type of manic agency, an increased desire to rebuild nature.

In conclusion, cloning is ethically wrong because it infringes the right to self-sufficiency. However, Sandel asserts that technology can be enhanced to ascertain that clones are at no increased risk than physically conceived children. Again, a sportsperson with genetically improved muscles, similar to a drug-enhanced sportsperson, would have an unjust benefit over his unenhanced opponents.

However, Sandel argues that making effort is not the peak of sports but excellence. He further asserts that excellence is partially exhibited in the innate gifts and talents that are not determined by the sportsperson who owns them.

Moreover, the ethics of memory enhancement point to the risk of producing two categories of people; those who have to survive with their natural abilities and those who can afford enhancement technologies. Sandel deems that cognitive enhancement would span the stroke amid enhancement and remedy.

He also clarifies that this enhancement could have merely non-therapeutic uses: for instance, by a public prosecutor seeking to memorize details for an impending trial. In addition, height enhancement is ethically wrong as it is jointly self-overpowering as several become taller while others turn out to be shorter than the custom.

The problem here is that the unenhanced may begin to think that they are very short which would in turn provoke them to look for treatment. Eventually, this could result to a hormonal warfare that can leave everybody shoddier, particularly those who are not capable of obtaining their way up from the tininess.

Conversely, Sandel feels that if we were worried merely by the unfairness of adding tininess to the troubles of the deprived, we could cure that injustice by publicly promoting height enhancements. Because of the comparative height deprivation experienced by innocent onlookers, he asserts that they could be remunerated by taxing those who purchase their means to bigger height.

Also, embryonic selection is ethically wrong since an embryo is a human being and hence should not be screened. However, Sandel supposes that if sex choice by sperm categorization is offensive, it should be for causes that go beyond the dispute about the ethical status of the embryo.

He further articulates that for those who think that communities with considerably fewer women than men will not be much stable, more aggressive, and more inclined to crime or conflict are not supposed to t do so since those are obvious qualms that the sperm-sorting firm takes care of.

Again, the morality of giftedness, under the cordon in sports continues in the role of parenting. Though we may select our partners and friends depending on the traits we find striking, we do not select our kids.

Their traits are impulsive, and even the most diligent parents cannot be held totally accountable for the type of kids they own.

Finally, genetic enhancements generally demoralize our civilization by intimidating our ability to act liberally, to thrive by our own hard work, and to deem ourselves liable, credible of praise or fault, for our own actions and status. Genetic engineering and enhancement demoralizes one’s effort and corrode human agency. From all these arguments, it’s explicit that genetic engineering and enhancements are ethically wrong.

Work Cited

Sandel, Michael. Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010

This essay on Ethics in the Case against Perfection was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.
Removal Request
If you are the copyright owner of this paper and no longer wish to have your work published on IvyPanda.
Request the removal

Need a custom Essay sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar

certified writers online

Cite This paper

Select a website referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2019, May 14). Ethics in the Case against Perfection. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-the-case-against-perfection-essay/

Work Cited

"Ethics in the Case against Perfection." IvyPanda, 14 May 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-the-case-against-perfection-essay/.

1. IvyPanda. "Ethics in the Case against Perfection." May 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-the-case-against-perfection-essay/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Ethics in the Case against Perfection." May 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-the-case-against-perfection-essay/.

References

IvyPanda. 2019. "Ethics in the Case against Perfection." May 14, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-the-case-against-perfection-essay/.

References

IvyPanda. (2019) 'Ethics in the Case against Perfection'. 14 May.

More related papers
Psst... Stuck with your
assignment? 😱
Hellen
Online
Psst... Stuck with your assignment? 😱
Do you need an essay to be done?
What type of assignment 📝 do you need?
How many pages (words) do you need? Let's see if we can help you!