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Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders Essay


There are many types of white-collar offenders. The most common forms are the positive extrovert, disagreeable businessperson, ultracompetitive, and neurotic (Hanser, Mire & Braddock, 2011). Researchers propose that numerous precise personality patterns may portray persons who participate in WCC (Walters & Geyer, 2004). There are three vital models used in the treatment of the above offenders. They are recidivism, deterioration, and harm-reduction. The paper below illustrates that harm-reduction is the best treatment for such offenders.

Criminal Thinking and Identity in Male White-Collar Offenders is utilized in the analysis (Walters & Geyer, 2004). The article suggested that white-collar criminals with no previous history of non-white-collar wrongdoing have decreased levels of wrong thinking, illegal documentation, and nonconformity.

The above comparison was done with respect with white-collar lawbreakers formerly detained for non-white-collar misconducts. The article also noted that professional criminals do not form same group according to their array of aberrant, level of nonconformity, approaches toward criminality, or social identity.

Positive extroverts commit white-collar crimes because of their unscrupulous and selfish traits and desire for control. The above offenders would employ their outgoing social skills as controlling tools to gain their desires and attain the social abilities they desire. Positive extroverts are best treated through harm reduction model.

Compared to the other approaches, the prototype seems the most favorable for measuring the success of the above incidence (Walters & Geyer, 2004). The model manages offenders effectively if minimal harm is committed through the treatment process unlike when no medication is administered at all.

For instance, a person who undertakes a treatment program for having committed a WCC may be seen as a management success even if he or she is later detained for a lesser crime (Feeley, 2006). The above is true if the offender is returned to the penitentiary for committing a non-white-collar crime. During such instances, the person will be perceived as a treatment success because a minimal injury was committed to a distinguishable victim.

Additional example is an employee who undertakes the treatment program for fierce conduct but returns to the treatment environment for destroying his or her personal possessions without doing direct physical harm to a person. In such, situations, his or her violent conduct was lessened with respect to damaging effect to identifiable others.

When considering Criminal Thinking and Identity in Male White-Collar Offenders’ case, the harm-reduction prototype will term the treatments availed a success. As such, the 23 offenders identified did not return to penitentiary for white-collar crimes but only for non-white-collar offences.

The significant advantage associated with this type of treatment is that it offers an enhanced and realistic approach to management when dealing with human conduct (Walters & Geyer, 2004). The above illustrations must be considered when developing and executing management programs with WCC criminals. Possibly, by highlighting criminal thinking and personality with WCC convicts who have a past of former non-WCC and emphasizing a dissimilar group of factors with persons who have ever engage in WCC.

In conclusion, it should be noted that there are many types of white-collar offenders. There are three vital models used in the treatment of the above offenders. Positive extroverts are forced to commit white-collar crimes by their unscrupulous and selfish traits and desire for control. The above offenders are best treated through harm reduction model. Compared to the other approaches to treatment, the prototype seems the most successful for the above incidence.

References

Feeley, D. (2006). Personality, Environment, and the Causes of White-Collar Crime. Law and Psychology, 30(201), 201-213.

Hanser, R., Mire, S., & Braddock, A. (2011). Correctional Counseling. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education/Prentice Hall.

Walters, G., & Geyer, M. (2004). Criminal Thinking and Identity in Male White-Collar Offenders. Criminal Justice Behavior, 31(3), 263-281.

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IvyPanda. (2020, April 9). Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/harm-reduction-treatment-model-for-offenders/

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1. IvyPanda. "Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders." April 9, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/harm-reduction-treatment-model-for-offenders/.


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IvyPanda. "Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders." April 9, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/harm-reduction-treatment-model-for-offenders/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders." April 9, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/harm-reduction-treatment-model-for-offenders/.

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IvyPanda. (2020) 'Harm-Reduction Treatment Model for Offenders'. 9 April.

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