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Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations Essay


Ophthalmic Drops

Ophthalmic suppositories comprise intraocular disks, ointments, and drops. Always thought to be sterilized, they are repeatedly prescribed subsequent to cataract amputation. They are also utilized to treat such eye issues as glaucoma and various other contagions (Kowalski et al., 2012). Ophthalmic suppositories are as well utilized to appease exasperated flesh, expand or narrow the pupils, and to serve as a means of anesthesia.

The problem with the ophthalmic drops is that this type of ophthalmic medication is accessible in a variety of concentrations. Therefore, it is imperative to certify that the patient is prescribed the right one so that the eye does not turn out to be hurt or irritated. The cornea of the eye comprises countless delicate nerve threads and is easily irritated by external stimuli (Salyani & Birt, 2015). The key point when instilling eye suppositories would be not to instill the medicine right on top of the cornea. The only place where ophthalmologic ointments, drops and intraocular disks should be put in the conjunctival sac. This part of the eye is not so delicate, and there is a much more suitable spot for instilling ophthalmic suppositories (McElhiney, 2013). I would recommend to softly wipe out any drainage along the eyelid boundary or internal canthus before instilling an ophthalmic medicine. The patient should start at the inner canthus and move in on the outer canthus. Keeping either in position can cultivate germs, upsurge the risk of contagion, and slow down the appropriate absorption of the medication (Salyani & Birt, 2015).

Ophthalmic Ointments

When instilling ophthalmic suppositories, the patients should not touch the tip of the medicine flask or tube to the eye. The latter is done in order to evade the transmission of bacteria to the medicine and damage to the eye. It is also advised not to press on the eyeball or touch the eye at all when making the conjunctival sac vulnerable to the external factors (Kowalski et al., 2012). It is advised to pull the eyelid down softly with the use of the thumb or index finger pushed against the cheekbone just under the lower eyelid. This would assist in showing the conjunctival sac and evading harming the eye. If the medicine ends up on the eyelid sideline, it is necessary to reiterate the process. If the medicine has the possibility to produce universal effects, put moderate pressure on the nasolacrimal channel for a minute or so (McElhiney, 2013). This would avert the medication from moving toward the inside of the nasal and pharyngeal passages and being captivated by the blood flow.

Geriatric and Pediatric Considerations

When it comes to pediatric patients, it is regularly beneficial to have the parents’ assistance in order to instill ophthalmic medicines in their kids (McElhiney, 2013). The nurse should ask the mother/ father to hold the kid on his/ her lap and mildly lock up the child’s head. If the patient does not want to open his or her eyes, the medication should be placed at the nasal bend where the eyelids close, so that when the child opens his/ her eyes, the medicine will make its way right into the eye (Kowalski et al., 2012). Many geriatric patients can instill ophthalmic medicines self-sufficiently. Nonetheless, certain individuals should be sure to teach their relatives or caregivers how to manage the dosages of necessary medications and how to instill those medications properly.

References

Kowalski, R. P., Yates, K. A., Romanowski, E. G., Karenchak, L. M., Mah, F. S., & Gordon, Y. J. (2012). An ophthalmologist’s guide to understanding antibiotic susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentration data. Ophthalmology, 112(11), 452-461.

McElhiney, L. F. (2013). Compounding guide for ophthalmic preparations. Washington, D.C.: American Pharmacists Association.

Salyani, A., & Birt, C. (2015). Evaluation of an eye drop guide to aid self-administration by patients experienced with topical use of glaucoma medication. Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology, 40(2), 170-174.

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IvyPanda. (2020, August 11). Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/ophthalmic-drops-amp-ointments-and-age-considerations/

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"Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations." IvyPanda, 11 Aug. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/ophthalmic-drops-amp-ointments-and-age-considerations/.

1. IvyPanda. "Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations." August 11, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ophthalmic-drops-amp-ointments-and-age-considerations/.


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IvyPanda. "Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations." August 11, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ophthalmic-drops-amp-ointments-and-age-considerations/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations." August 11, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ophthalmic-drops-amp-ointments-and-age-considerations/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Ophthalmic Drops & Ointments and Age Considerations'. 11 August.

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