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“Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals” by S. Crowley Essay

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Updated: May 13th, 2021

Introduction

Speech acts as a strong pointer through which the indiscernible body results in godly tasks by the ability to prevent fear, expel sorrow, generate joy, and foster pity. Rhetors may find arguments in the subject matter (logos) and the character of rhetoric (ethos) might be compelling. In line with Aristotle, one approach of intrinsic proof is that rhetors may fascinate human emotions (pathos). Reading further elucidates how ancient rhetors, for instance, Cicero and Aristotle, portray pathos as the attraction of sentiments as it may involve experience, distress, and sentiments. Cicero and Aristotle shed light on a range of emotions relevant to the application of rhetorical discourse, for instance, abhorrence/adoration or confidence/fear.

What has been discussed in a fascinating manner is the ancient rhetors’ conviction that emotions have to be differentiated from pain, delight, and principles while all the three function as the basis for feelings. It was made clear that ancient rhetors treated sentiments as a means of identification, linking them to the intellectual progression or an approach of reckoning. They have to be differentiated from attributes such as goodness and fairness. Nevertheless, people have a tendency of clinging to values with passion with such intensity being what holds the rhetorical strength of emotional appeals.

Main body

Human beings react emotionally the moment that they or their close allies are commended or bullied; rhetorically, they also act in the same manner if their principles are supported or threatened. Out of all the ancient types of rhetorical corroborations, the attraction to emotions appears the most eccentric to modern rhetors. Possibly it seems somehow slapdash to draw detestation, anger, and fear. Nowadays, human beings are inclined to revering reasonableness, and in the present civilization a sharp difference is usually made between emotion and reason; if a person is emotional, they are perceived to be irrational as well.

On this note, it is presumed that emotions may spoil reason or result in a person going berserk. Aristotle appears to have been the first rhetorician to offer a methodical argument of emotional proofs. He depicted emotions as the things that, by experiencing transformation, may make people vary in their arguments. Aristotle discovered that emotions are communal by the fact that they are normally elicited by one’s interactions with others. A person does not get irritated in an unclear or general manner; typically, an individual becomes angry at another or other people. Moreover, a person cannot fall in love with nothingness but with another individual.

Conclusion

Ancient rhetoricians propose that successful emotional appeals result in issues enlivening audiences and assisting them to distinguish what is at risk. Cicero claimed that rhetors have to in a way make themselves understand the most favorable emotions to stimulate in the audience. By having the capacity to envisage emotions induced by a scene, rhetors may elicit comparable sentiments in the audience through deploying the strength of energies, a position where rhetors depict occurrences so intensely that they appear to be happening before spectators. Another approach to stimulating emotions is the use of expressions that are honorific or dyslogistic, which both articulate value judgments.

Honorific expressions are reverential of things or people whereas dyslogistic ones vilify and underrate them. Devoid of such expressions, the emotional appeal seems to scatter. In addition, authors’ ethos varies and becomes outlying and formal and revision less appealing when compared to the original, which implies that dyslogistic expressions are striking, emphatic, and convincing.

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IvyPanda. (2021, May 13). "Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/pathetic-proof-passionate-appeals-by-s-crowley/

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""Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley." IvyPanda, 13 May 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/pathetic-proof-passionate-appeals-by-s-crowley/.

1. IvyPanda. ""Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley." May 13, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/pathetic-proof-passionate-appeals-by-s-crowley/.


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IvyPanda. ""Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley." May 13, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/pathetic-proof-passionate-appeals-by-s-crowley/.

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IvyPanda. 2021. ""Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley." May 13, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/pathetic-proof-passionate-appeals-by-s-crowley/.

References

IvyPanda. (2021) '"Pathetic Proof: Passionate Appeals" by S. Crowley'. 13 May.

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