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Space: Key Component of Architecture Essay

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Updated: Sep 15th, 2022

In architectural terms, space is the gap between the ground, walls, and ceiling. However, space is not nothingness. Architectural spaces can be either extrovert, closed, centrifugal, concentrated, or open. The main difference between space and mass is that space is closed whereas mass is concentrated. Space offers hospitality and freedom, which is essential to people who occupy the space (Von Meiss, 1990, p. 101). Space facilitates social interactions rather than political interactions. Therefore, architectural space is not political.

Virtually every aspect of an individual’s life has boundaries. Architecture creates spaces that define the social boundaries of people in a certain society. Physical space portrays the social space within the society. Houses in different cultures have boundaries that define social classifications and attempt to regulate the behavior of people in society (Burton, 2008, p. 68). Cultures that have housing structures with ample space create a sense of freedom and provide a favorable ground for children and members of the community to flourish.

Space portrays the social character of a society. It portrays the networks of social relationships that define the community. Thus, space defines various relationships – from intimate personal relationships to formal relationships – that define thirty (Knowles, 2003, p. 103). The empirical transformation of social space into physical space portrays the environment’s social reality (Lefebvre & Goonewardena, 2008, p. 48). Therefore, space may explain the level of individualism of a society.

Space is a separate entity from the political inclinations of society. The creation and maintenance of space in society are not entirely due to political factors. Therefore, it is possible to amend the political space without interfering with the physical space of the society (Rosen-Zvi, 2004, p. 145). However, if physical space had any political affiliations, it would be impossible to alter political space without affecting physical space.

Architecture is primarily a trade. Therefore, architecture – and in essence space – are prone to market forces. However, architecture is different from other arts. Architecture works within the market whereas other arts work outside the market. Other forms of art constitute the culture of a certain community even before their sale. However, architecture becomes part of the culture of the community only after its sale and construction. Therefore, architecture becomes part of the culture of a community after it leaves the market (Leach, 1997, p. 257). Since architecture only becomes part of the culture of the society after it leaves the market, it would be wrong to claim that architectural space is political.

Architecture attempts to capture the concept of humanism. Architectural aesthetics portray an image of vibrant life in the world. However, architecture may also portray the image of chaos. In architecture, the building represents the world. Therefore, architects portray their perception of the world using space. Humanism transcribes the notion of order in the world. Therefore, architectural space attempts to portray the image of order (Leach, 1997, p. 267). In so doing, architectural space portrays the societal organization.

Architectural space portrays societal relationships. Architectural space may portray an image of peace and tranquility in society. The origin of the architectural space determines whether it is political or not. Physical space has very little association with political space. It is possible to alter political space without interfering with physical space. Therefore, it is pertinent to say that space is not political.

References

Burton, D 2008, Cross-cultural marketing: Theory, practice and relevance, Oxon, Taylor & Francis.

Knowles, C 2003, Race and social analysis, London, Sage Publications.

Leach, N 1997, Rethinking architecture: A reader in cultural theory, London, Routledge.

Lefebvre, H & Goonewardena, K 2008, Space difference, everyday life: Henri Lefebvre and radical politics, London, Routledge.

Von Meiss, P 1990, Elements of architecture, Oxon, Taylor & Francis.

Rosen-Zvi, I 2004, Taking space seriously: Law, space, and society in contemporary Israel, Burlington, VT, Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

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IvyPanda. 2022. "Space: Key Component of Architecture." September 15, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/space-key-component-of-architecture/.

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