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Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor’s Approaches Research Paper


Riding a bike is both a physical and psychological activity because it requires the coordination of various systems of the body. The human brain is fundamental to learning the process. According to behavioral scientists, the brain influences the ability to balance and peddle a bike. A person intending to ride a bike should learn the basic procedures of riding before he or she can accomplish the process. A leaner should instruct his brain for him to grasp the procedure. The basic concepts include steering, balancing, and peddling (Mauer, 2010). People learn to ride bikes for different reasons. For example, several persons use bikes for transport while the rest use it as a sporting activity.

Operational conditioning

Operational conditioning entails realigning learner’s behavior using threats and rewards. In the process, a learner acknowledges fundamental concepts pertaining to riding bikes. For example, learners should respond to a given situation in a given way when coordinating body movements and behavior. According to Mauer (2010), riding a bike requires that one acknowledges the concepts of balancing. A professional trainer should guide the learner during the process. Consequently, the learner should try several before they can understand the concept. Peddling, balancing, and steering are the activities associated with operational conditioning that learners practice. Mauer (2010) further adds that riding should focus on moving forward.

Reinforcement

There are two types of reinforcements with the most common, including positive reinforcement. During the process, a learner is encouraged to adopt behaviors that enhance performance. This helps in developing a positive response needed to accomplish the process. Trainers combine the learning practice with activities that riders enjoy doing. However, negative reinforcement eliminates fun processes. The trainer limits the challenges that face the rider. According to Wallack & Katovsky (2005), the trainer motivates the learner by introducing enticing activities to riding. In both reinforcements, learners adjust behaviors to adapt to the conditions of riding. Negative reinforcement instills precaution, like putting on helmets.

Reward and punishment

Rewards and punishment target behaviors that influence performance. According to Wallack & Katovsky (2005), punishment discourages undesired behaviors while rewards encourage behaviors that are beneficial to the learning process. Additionally, rewards pose several advantages during its application. For example, a rider is motivated when he receives a reward for having peddled on his own. The application of reward and punishment in learning to ride a bike helps when training teenagers how to brake. According to Wallack & Katovsky (2005), trainers should limit punishment for learners. This encourages the learner to undertake initiatives in learning the process of riding. For example, learners will dedicate most of the time to riding bikes.

Operational conditioning

A valuable aspect of instrumental conditioning that enhances the education process is positive reinforcement. According to Gagnon & Collay (2006), trainers use the method when training adults because it is effective. Motivated learners grasp ideas faster. However, discouraged learners easily forget the concepts of riding. This is because attitude plays a fundamental role in influencing activities involving the coordination of the brain and the body. Negative reinforcement can also facilitate the training process for children who neglect the basic steps of riding.

Riding is a societal and sporting activity that is dependent on the physical and psychological process. It is essential for the learner to comprehend these concepts. The instructor should employ reinforcement to facilitate learning.

References

Gagnon, G. W., & Collay, M. (2006). Constructivist learning design: Key questions for teaching to standards. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.

Mauer, T. (2010). Bicycle Riding. New York, NY: Rourke Pub Llc

Wallack, R. M., & Katovsky, B. (2005). Bike for life: How to ride to 100. New York, NY: Marlowe & Co.

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IvyPanda. (2020, July 20). Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/teaching-riding-a-bike-instructors-approaches/

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"Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches." IvyPanda, 20 July 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/teaching-riding-a-bike-instructors-approaches/.

1. IvyPanda. "Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches." July 20, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/teaching-riding-a-bike-instructors-approaches/.


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IvyPanda. "Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches." July 20, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/teaching-riding-a-bike-instructors-approaches/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches." July 20, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/teaching-riding-a-bike-instructors-approaches/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Teaching Riding a Bike: Instructor's Approaches'. 20 July.

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