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Technological Dependence Essay


With rapid technological developments, many people are today concerned with the impact of technology in the life of the modern man. In other words, the question on many peoples’ minds is: have people become too overly dependent on technology? In an attempt to answer this question, this paper addresses the above.

Introduction

Technology is part and parcel of people’s daily lives today. Cell phones, iPods, tablets, televisions, computers, and the internet are among the most common forms of technology in use today. Research has shown that the modern generation almost has a near-obsession with any kind of technology (Campbell et al., 2006, 547 – 556). The man continues to rely on technology to improve and expedite the performance of tasks in various industries and offices. This implies that today, work has been made easier to accomplish because of technology.

Have people become too overly dependent on technology?

Yes, the world has become so technologically dependent. Today, over 30% of people across the globe feel helpless and unable to function without the internet (Campbell et al., 2006, 547 – 556). Smartphones, which enable users to access the internet, have today become so commonplace. These phones enable users to access Facebook, transfer money, and share information at any time. However, Campbell et al. (2006, 547 – 556) have warned that these phones, as well as the internet, are very addictive.

Technology has reinvented itself to become one of the most important things in the life of the modern person (Campbell et al., 2006, 547 – 556). Today, technology is being used in education, business, military, as well in research institutions. The strength of a country’s military is today gauged on the basis of the level of technology adopted in training the soldiers, such as in areas of intelligence. These further highlight the extent today’s’ modern man is over-dependent on technology. Today, people can study online while businesses are increasingly seeking to avail of their goods and services over the internet.

Over-dependence on technology is today evident even at home. Today, any modern home is likely to have at least one of the following electrical appliances: a dishwasher, dry cleaner, microwave, or refrigerator, among others. According to Campbell et al. (2006, 547 – 556), people no longer need to rely on human effort to cook, do laundry, or wash utensils. Still, computer games are today increasingly facing out traditional games that children used to play in the compound. Children today prefer PlayStations or other indoor games, whose overdependence could cause laziness and lead to obesity for lack of physical activity (Campbell et al., 2006, 547 – 556).

Technology has equally enhanced communication and flow of information. Today, information can be relayed in real-time through telephone, email, or live chat. These are gradually replacing the traditional snail mail or courier services. Hospitals, hotels, and other industries have not been spared by this technology bug. Simikta & Mishra (2006) have observed that hospitals are today increasingly using technology to capture and manage patient records. Likewise, customers are today able to make reservations and payments for hotels from the comfort of their homes courtesy of technology.

Conclusion

Technology has changed the way of modern life. It has enhanced communication, facilitated online business, strengthened militaries, and enhanced work both at home and in offices. As much as it brings immense benefits, man has become over-dependent on technology. The implication is that people, more so the younger generation, have totally missed its point. Today, if a teenager forgot their phone behind, it is not uncommon for them to feel imaginary vibrations or ringtones as if they actually had their phone with them (Campbell et al., 2006, 547 – 556). This demonstrates how people have become too overly dependent on technology.

References

Campbell, E. M., Sittig, D. F., Ash, J,. & Guappone, K., et al. (2006). Types of unintended consequences related to computerized order entry. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 13 (5), 547 – 556. Web.

Shortliffe, E. H., & Perreault, L. E. (2001). Medical informatics: Computer applications in health care and biomedicine (2nd ed.). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Simikta, M., & Mishra, K. C. (2006). Medical informatics: an exploration. India: ICFAI University Press.

This essay on Technological Dependence was written and submitted by your fellow student.
This paper has been submitted by user Ray Dean who studied at the University of Houston, USA, with average GPA 3.04 out of 4.0.
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Dean, R. (2020, May 22). Technological Dependence [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/technological-dependence/

Work Cited

Dean, Ray. "Technological Dependence." IvyPanda, 22 May 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/technological-dependence/.

1. Ray Dean. "Technological Dependence." IvyPanda (blog), May 22, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/technological-dependence/.


Bibliography


Dean, Ray. "Technological Dependence." IvyPanda (blog), May 22, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/technological-dependence/.

References

Dean, Ray. 2020. "Technological Dependence." IvyPanda (blog), May 22, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/technological-dependence/.

References

Dean, R. (2020) 'Technological Dependence'. IvyPanda, 22 May.

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