“The evolution of the returns to education for 21- to 35-year-olds in Canada and across provinces: Results from the 1991–2006 analytical census files” by Bourbeau, E., Lefebvre, P., and Merrigan, P Essay (Critical Writing)

Article Review: “The evolution of the returns to education for 21- to 35-year-olds in Canada and across provinces: Results from the 1991–2006 analytical census files” by Bourbeau, E., Lefebvre, P., and Merrigan, P

Introduction

Explicit review of this analytical paper resonates within an unlimited time frame. Reflectively, the review will authenticate relevance of the article, “The evolution of the returns to education for 21- to 35-year-olds in Canada and across provinces: Results from the 1991–2006 analytical census files”.

The article comprehensively captures conceptualisation ideas discussed within its periphery of ideal and actualisation. Besides, the paper reflects on the methodology strategy and adopted methods.

In addition, the paper investigates research designs and conceptualised results which are quantifiable and assess the same in terms of relevance in the return to education decision in Canada. The scope of this article review is to capture the influence of wage differentials, age, gender, skills, and location on the return to education decision.

Article Summary

This scientific study explores the progression of the decision to return to education among the Canadians between the age of 21 and 35 years. This group is classified in terms of gender, region, and education group. The research relies on secondary data from the previous census files.

The findings reveal that the male gender is more likely to return to education than the female gender. Besides, those with the diploma education are more likely to return to education to attract higher income than degree holders.

However, the article concluded that the return to education is greatly influenced by the location and the career of the young persons (Bourbeau, Lefebvre, and Merrigan, 2012). Several factors affect the return to education decision as evident in the survey results.

Reflectively, equilibrium and transitional wage differentials offer a valid explanation for the labour differential persistence among the young Canadians who fall in the age bracket of 21-35 years.

These variances are attributed to inconsistencies between casual and empirical wage rate reviews. Besides, non-wage factors, such as fringe benefits, job location, age, and wage advancement prospects.

Evaluation

As a matter of fact, the article is clear on segmentation of the research target, the dynamics and unique aspects of the segment of the study. Also, the findings and recommendations presented in this research article are relevant and may paint the actual picture of the return to education decision since the sample space was very big.

Besides, the authors are specific on the time frame for the alleged causes and measurement indices for an otherwise result. As observed in the research methodology, the authors employed the use of qualitative research methodology which measures assumptions given and reflectively develops quantifiable results (Bourbeau, Lefebvre, and Merrigan, 2012).

This method comprehensively captures the key theme which is a reflection on the influence of age, gender, and skills on the return to education decision.

Methodology, analysis and relevance

The authors employed a mixture of simple and complex correlation analysis involving measurement of dependent and independent variables. These variables are wage differentials, age, gender, skills, and region interacting with the return to education decision.

The simultaneous application and measurement of independent and dependent variable are great and capture true value representation of the target population.

Thus, the decision by the authors to use intrusive regression analysis was relevant in quantifying the relationship between the independent variable of return to education and dependent variables of the study (Bourbeau, Lefebvre, and Merrigan, 2012).

The relationship between the variables was properly expanded to accommodate groups, in pairs such as the female and the male gender. Since it was properly used, the regression analysis produced quantifiable and realistic results within a minimal error range.

In practicality, the authors assigned the right variable representation to balance the actual and expected results. The same procedure was used to calculate the results for the expanded variables to minimize errors as a result of excessive assumptions.

This calculation was repeated for the number of measurement variables to obtain an accurate relationship and correlation between every pair of quantifiable factors.

Once respective values were obtained, it was easier to mathematically draw intrinsic and extrinsic relationships between dependent and independent variables. The research work appears comprehensive and professional since the authors included the results and their interpretation.

Specifically, use of regression analysis provided accurate data despite the evaluation being by implicit nature. In order to obtain actual and study psychological reaction for response given, the researchers adopted a non biased tool for obtaining data.

Therefore, the research article was specific since qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis approaches were simultaneously employed in the variable testing and pairing process. This has minimised anybiases in the conceptualisation of data generated by the authors.

Significance of the article

The most essential part of a properly written research paper should reflect on the conceptualisation and maintain originality. This research paper provides a clear link between one variable to another and is based on quantifiable evidences.

Besides, the analysis presents a complete reflection of actual return to the education situation in different geographical environments within Canada (Bourbeau, Lefebvre, and Merrigan, 2012). For instance, the article is loud on the difference between the male and female gender on return to education probability.

Due to the special nature of the interest group, the authors were very technical in treating each set of data as independent of the other.

Therefore, results obtained in this analysis were not biased on the actual return to education situation in Canada. Different work environments require different strategies for resolving the identified factors.

This article is quite useful in developing the existing general knowledge about the return to education decision and different internal and environmental factors operating around an individual. Argument construction is a systematic and dynamic process.

The main objective, sub-objective, and environment influence its process of dissemination. The article confirms that having a well prepared argument logic plan will ensure that a person is adequately prepared with all the materials that are needed to deliver a properly constructed and easy to interpret research findings.

This is not only essential in building up the general knowledge on this topic, but also giving an insight to the government of Canada and organizations on how they can successfully adopt these approaches for the betterment of their employees.

There is a consistent wage differential pattern in the sample. Specifically, this is as a result of mobility and their influence on the research variables.

Conclusion

The authors are specific on the time frame for the alleged causes and measurement indices for an otherwise result. This approach is comprehensive in capturing the key theme which is a reflection on the influence of perceived and real environmental factors on the return to education decision.

Moreover, since the study dwell on aspects of role congruity, workplace initiative, and other physical environmental factors, it is fair to conclude that the elements of gender, age, and skill level are the main factors influencing the decision to return to education.

Reference

Bourbeau, E., Lefebvre, P., & Merrigan, P. (2012). The evolution of the returns to education for 21- to 35-year-olds in Canada and across provinces: Results from the 1991–2006 analytical census files. Canadian Public Policy, 38 (4), 531-549.

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