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Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways Essay


Introduction

About the work

The problem of stowaways has been around for years. In some states, it has been ignored, some address it rather roughly by fines and other penalties. The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) decided to approach the problem by identifying the possible stowaways. In their article, the NY Times Editorial Board members evaluate the losses that the research failure has triggered.

Background information

The number of passengers avoiding paying for the ride has increased in the U.S. recently. In order to avoid further losses, the TSA has launched a research project. It was suggested that a behavioral study of the passengers could help solve the problem of stowaways.

Thesis statement

Despite lacking in details about the research that was carried out, the paper still offers a very strong and reasonable judgement about the research results.

Summary

Main point

The authors of the article argue that the approach towards preventing people taking free public transport rides is completely nonsensical, and that there was no way for it to end successfully. According to the editorial, the “multiyear experiment in behavior detection” (Behavior detection isn’t paying off, 2014, April 6, para. 1) has only confirmed the TSA’s “reputation for wastefulness” (Behavior detection isn’t paying off, 2014, April 6, para. 1).

Support for the “takeaway”

The article provides rather scanty, yet very convincing evidence of the state authorities’ failure to conduct the experiment successfully: according to the article, about $1 billion was spent on the research, with no evident results (Behavior detection isn’t paying off, 2014, April 6, para. 1).

Interpretation

Logic and organization

The organization and coherence of the article is quite acceptable. The information in editorial flows quite naturally and is arranged properly. The authors start with a “clinger” by claiming that the TSA has proved its “wastefulness,” explain the issue and provide their commentaries on the problem.

Fallacies

The article layout is very clear and the author gets their point across in a very convincing manner. It does not have any tangible logical fallacy, either. Perhaps, the fact that a research on 200 cases was used to prove a universal point can be considered a fallacy: “One survey of more than 200 studies” (Behavior detection isn’t paying off, 2014, April 6, para. 3). Therefore, the editorial may have an argument of personal incredulity (Bennett, 2013, p. 93).

Accuracy

The article is accurate enough. It provides exact numbers and verified data. Thus, it can be assumed that the authors of the editorial are doing a rather good job of representing the dilemmas that the people employed in the U.S. transportation system services have to deal with on a regular basis.

Topic treatment

The discussion in the editorial is restricted to the topic. However, at some point, the authors switch to discussing the efficacy of the GAO (Government Accountability Office). Nevertheless, for the most part, the discussion revolves around the TSA.

Audience appeal

The article is not designed for any particular type of audience. The article can appear engaging to both a middle class citizen and a tycoon. Herein the secret to the article’s appeal lies.

Clarity of language

The language is rather clear; the author obviously avoids any misinterpretations of their point of view. The article features neither complicated words, nor overly long sentences. Thus, the clarity of the author’s viewpoint is obvious.

Hidden assumptions

As it has been stressed above, the author of the article criticises the state policy openly. The satirical tone of the article can be spotted instantly. Because of the critical tone, the article does not need any hidden assumptions.

Conclusion

Though the article has some flaws, it provides an honest overview of the problem. The authors define the key issues and explain why the provided solutions have failed. The editorial is a peculiar commentary on the practical application of behaviour related theories.

Reference List

(2014). The New York Times. Web.

Bennett, B. (2013). Logically fallacious: The ultimate collection of over 300 logical fallacies (academic edition). Sudbury. Web.

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Reference

IvyPanda. (2020, May 18). Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/transportation-security-the-problem-of-stowaways/

Work Cited

"Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways." IvyPanda, 18 May 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/transportation-security-the-problem-of-stowaways/.

1. IvyPanda. "Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways." May 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/transportation-security-the-problem-of-stowaways/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways." May 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/transportation-security-the-problem-of-stowaways/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways." May 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/transportation-security-the-problem-of-stowaways/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Transportation Security: the Problem of Stowaways'. 18 May.

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