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Cloud Computing Case Study


Cloud computing can be defined as a group of controls and policiesthat aim at securing data, applications, and the associated services of cloud computing.Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) is one group of services offered by cloud computing(Amrhein and Scott 1).

In the software-as-a-service, the retailerprovides the software product,the hardware infrastructure and networks with the user via a front-end portal. SaaS is anextremelylarge market. The services range from web-based email to database processing and account control(Chee and Franklin 2). Since the service provider hosts both the information and application, the consumer can liberally use the service from anyplace.

Cloud computing is not a thing that can be purchased byconsumers.Consumers should not care whether they receive appliancesusing cloud computing or not. Cloud computing is anoperationform for appliances that companies employso as todecrease infrastructure overheads and or deal with scalability and capacity issues.

During normal cloud computing situations,companies administer their applications from a data huboffered by the cloud provider who is a third party.The provider is accountable for supplying servers, storage, networking andinfrastructure required to guarantee the accessibility of the applications.

How Conversion to the Cloud might be Accomplished and Safeguarded

In financiallydistressed times, many corporations tend to adjourn upgrading their IT systems. As an alternative, they give precedence toIT projects intended to augment competence. The initiative of switching older desktop PCs into thin clients, and as a consequencehomogenizing them, unites both of these techniques by concurrentlysafeguarding yourIT venture and cutting your IT overheads.

Thin client conversionsoftware can boost the service life of subsisting computinghardware by more than two years, regardless of whether it concernsolder thin clients, net-tops or PCs.

The Future of Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)

In my opinion, software as a service cloud computing isnot going to dominate the next several years in information management. This is due to the reasons highlighted below.

Security

In almost all surveysconducted on cloud computing, the peak reason given for not assuming, it is a fear over security(Fornes 2; Schneier 1).Placing your business-crucial data in the arms of an external provider still propels shivers down the spines of nearly all CIO’s.

A certain school of thought argues thatkeeping data in the cloud is more secure than having it on interior servers linked to the Internet. The latest case of a hacker who found his way into the United Statesadministration network demonstrates that allegedly secure networks can also behacked (Kynetix Technology Group 15).Firms need to be certain about the height of security they have in theirbusiness.

Data Location and Privacy

Information, in a cloud computing situation, has to subsist on physical servers someplace in the world and the physical locality of those servers is significant under many states’ laws. This is particularlyvital for firms that do business across stateborders, as diverse privacy and data administration laws apply in diversenations.

For instance, the European Union places sternrestrictions on the records that can be kepton its folks and the duration that it can be stored. Most banking managers alsorequire clients’ financial information to remain in their domesticnation.

Several compliance regulations necessitate that data not be inter-merged with other information, for instance on shared databases or servers. For instance, Canada is anxious about U.S.-centered servers hosting its public segmentprogramssince under the U.S. Patriot Act; itcan be accessed by the U.S. administration.Besides, others think that web browsers do not provide sufficient interaction.

Internet Dependency, Performance and Latency

A distress for severalorganizations is that cloud computing depends on the accessibility, performance and eminence of their internet links.Transferring a present in-house appliance to the cloud will have a number of trade-offs in regard to performance. Nearly allcurrent business applications cannot beplanned with the consideration of the cloud.

Companiesthinking of investing in cloud computing will have to factor in overheads for enhancing the network infrastructure in order to administer cloud applications.Again, leading firms want to possess the software, as opposed to leasing it(Fornes 1).

At the software height, appliances will have to be designed for the cloud so as to attaingreatest performance. The thin-client browser based applications are addressing this issue. However, a lot of them would still require re-designing so as to gain from a cloud setting.

The length of timea package of data takes to shift from one chosenplace to another, latency, will be an issue forsome applications. Selling applications that necessitate no latency will perhaps be at home for several coming years. One principal concern with putting these appliances in the cloud is that Internet latency is vastlyerratic and irregular.Several cloud computing critics claim that the cloud will never be capable of supporting these sorts of appliances.

Availability and Service Levels

A keyissue concerning cloud computing is the prospective for down-time in case the system is not accessible for application.This presents a critical problemin the line of enterprise apps, aseachsecond of downtime is a second that some vital business role can not be executed.The new, vast public outages further aggravated these issues at severalkey cloud providers such as Amazon and Google.

Severalorganizations thinking of assuming cloud computing will require service-level agreements (SLAs) to offer them some certaintyregardingaccessibility(Kynetix Technology Group 15). Astonishingly, a numberof cloudvendors do notpresent SLAs and several others offer insufficient SLAs.

Cloud vendorshave to become serious regarding offering trustworthy SLAs if the intensification of cloud computing has to continue. Simply because a vendor says that they can convey a certain service over the web healthier than an internal IT groupcan not make it essentially true.

Even in circumstances when they can, how can they be convinced that they do it constantly and, in case they are not, what reimbursement is due back to the client?Skepticswill argue that service level agreements are not of any significance. They will reveal that an SLA does not essentially assist in acquiring high value uptime, but presents a foundation for conflict conciliation when things are grim.

Current Enterprise Applications Cannot Be Migrated Easily

Switching a contemporary application to cloud is not as effortless as it may seem. Diverse cloud vendorscompeldissimilar application architectures which are alwaysdifferentfrom architectures of business applications.

As a result, for a complex multitier appliance that relies on inner databases and that suppliesmillions of clients with ever-transforming access rights, it isgoing to be a hardswap to a cloud policy.

In actuality, manyorganizations that assume cloud computing will end upusingfresh applications(Kynetix Technology Group 15). Contemporary applications will possiblypersist to run on-premise for a while. This is not to state that such applications can not be changed but that the overheads of the switch will often overshadow the profits.

Amazon Web Services provides the largestsupplenesswith reference toswitching applications as it provides a bare image that one can put whatever thing into. Nevertheless, it is not easy to shift applications owing to its distinctive storage structure.

In conclusion, software as a service cloud computing is not going to dominate the next several years in information management. The first reason for not assuming it is a fear over security. Most business managersdreadplacingtheir business-crucial data in the arms of an external provider.

Secondly, information in a cloud computing situation has to subsist on physical servers someplace in the world and the physical locality of those servers is significant under many states’ laws.Thirdly, cloud computing depends on the accessibility, performance and eminence of their internet links. Companies thinking of investing in cloud computing will have to factor in overheads for enhancing the network infrastructure so as to administer cloud applications.

Although the thin-client browser based applications are addressing this issue, a lot of them would still require re-designing so as to gain from a cloud setting. Fourthly, a numberof cloud vendors do not present SLAs and several others offer insufficient SLAs.

Cloud vendors are never serious about offering trustworthy SLAs. Lastly, switching a contemporary application to cloud is usually difficult. Many companies would prefer applications that are easy to shift. In actuality, many organizations that assume cloud computing will end up using fresh applications.

Works Cited

Amrhein, Dustin and Scott Quint. Cloud Computing for the Enterprise: Capturing the Cloud. IBM Corporation, 2010.Web.

Chee, Brian and Franklin Curtis. Applications for Clouds. CRC Press, 2010. Web.

Fornes, Don.The Software as a Service Dilemma. The Software Advice Blog, 2010. Web.

Kynetix Technology Group. Cloud Computer: A Strategy Guide for Board Level Executives. London: Sage, 2009

Schneier, Bruce. Cloud Computing. Schneier on Security, 2009. Web.

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IvyPanda. (2018, June 14). Cloud Computing. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/cloud-computing/

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"Cloud Computing." IvyPanda, 14 June 2018, ivypanda.com/essays/cloud-computing/.

1. IvyPanda. "Cloud Computing." June 14, 2018. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cloud-computing/.


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IvyPanda. "Cloud Computing." June 14, 2018. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cloud-computing/.

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IvyPanda. 2018. "Cloud Computing." June 14, 2018. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cloud-computing/.

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IvyPanda. (2018) 'Cloud Computing'. 14 June.

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