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Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Essay (Article)


Introduction

There is an eminent application of scientific metaphors in describing the functioning of the human brain. There are notable similarities and differences in “cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience” (Chapman & King, 2009). This paper presents two separate dialogues about metaphors and analogies used to describe the “functioning of the human brain” (Hunt, 2007).

Dialogue with George Miller

Reporter: Mr. Miller, thank you very much for agreeing to take part in this interview. There are outstanding metaphors and analogies, which are being used to explain the functioning of the human brain. As an expert in this field, what would you say about this statement?

George Miller: The way our brain works has been extensively misunderstood. However, theoretical arguments about metaphors and analogies provide substantial understanding. The analysis of corpus of texts found in the brain shows the existence of spatial, personification, and scientific metaphors (Hunt, 2007). Indeed, these metaphors are linked with other scientific arguments.

Reporter: Mr. Miller, could you explain further about the three metaphors?

George Miller: spatial metaphors are normally the main type representation that exists in the form of texts inside the brain. Metaphors such as “container” are predominantly used to label the brain as a source domain. The brain is considered a container (Chapman & King, 2009).

The brain stores information, hints, memories, and opinions among others. These are labeled as “things or objects” with the ability to move into the “container” (Chapman & King, 2009).

Personification is also used as a metaphor to describe the human brain. However, it is regularly overlooked in scientific conversations about metaphors. There are semantic features of personification, which uses “to work or communicate verbs” to explain the functioning of the brain (Hunt, 2007).

Furthermore, the brain is personified to be acting like human beings. Technological metaphors such as computers are also applicable in describing the brain.

Reporter: Mr. Miller, thank you for sharing this crucial information. Many people should comprehend how metaphors have been used to label the functioning of the human brain.

George Miller: Thank you too.

Dialogue with Martha Farah

Reporter: Ms. Farah, thank you for accepting to participate in this interview. Apparently, the application of metaphors in explaining the functioning of the human brain constantly confuses many people. You have been practicing in this field for over a decade now, could you help me understand the concept?

Martha Farah: There are different metaphors and analogies that are used in explaining the human brain functioning. First, information processing abilities have been employed to show the resemblance between human reasoning and supercomputer functioning.

However, this approach has shown limited resemblance. The processors are regarded as information handling systems (Hunt, 2007). They combine new material to the stored information to offer explanation to diverse problems.

Conversely, the human brain processes information generated through cognition due to several contradictory sensitive and motivational circumstances. Furthermore, the “central processing unit” of most computers has limited volume (Chapman & King, 2009). Conversely, the human brain has a larger capacity that enables it to process widespread parallel information.

Reporter: Ms. Farah, what could be the other metaphors used to describe the human brain functioning?

Martha Farah: There are spatial metaphors used in texts on peoples’ brains. “Path” is regularly used to describe the brain as a landscape where information, thoughts, and opinions among others pass through into a “container” (Hunt, 2007). Notably, it is believed that movements of signals into the brain stimulate action in human beings.

Reporter: It is very interesting to comprehend that processors and the human brain operates almost in similar ways. Thank you the explanations.

Martha Farah: You are welcome.

References

Chapman, C., & King, R. M. (2009). Test success in the brain-compatible classroom. California, CA: Corwin Press.

Hunt, M. (2007). The story of psychology. New York, NY: Anchor Books.

This Article on Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience was written and submitted by user Scream to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Scream studied at DePaul University, USA, with average GPA 3.61 out of 4.0.

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Scream. (2019, December 10). Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/cognitive-psychology-and-cognitive-neuroscience/

Work Cited

Scream. "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience." IvyPanda, 10 Dec. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/cognitive-psychology-and-cognitive-neuroscience/.

1. Scream. "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience." IvyPanda (blog), December 10, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cognitive-psychology-and-cognitive-neuroscience/.


Bibliography


Scream. "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience." IvyPanda (blog), December 10, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cognitive-psychology-and-cognitive-neuroscience/.

References

Scream. 2019. "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience." IvyPanda (blog), December 10, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/cognitive-psychology-and-cognitive-neuroscience/.

References

Scream. (2019) 'Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience'. IvyPanda, 10 December.

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