Home > Free Essays > Art > Paintings > Colors in “Impression, Sunrise” by Claude Monet
3 min
Cite This

Colors in “Impression, Sunrise” by Claude Monet Report

StarStarStarStarStar

Introduction

The image, “Impression, Sunrise”, is a complex and well-thought piece, that demonstrates some interesting facts. The most conspicuous interesting aspect of the image is the blend of colors in the image. The colors in the image are predominantly yellow, red, green, orange, black, and cyan, which is a blend of blue and green. These colors blend very well, which helps in bringing out the intended impression of the image (Maund, 2006).

Color coding system

Using the RGB common color notation system, the colors contained in the image, “The impression sunrise” includes a blend of yellow and red, especially at the upper left section of the image. The blend is mixed to show dark yellow. At the part below the left-hand corner of the image is a blend of dark green, representing the figures that closely represent plants of some kind. Close to the green-colored figures are shades of cyan, which is a blend of blue and green, which is used to represent the water in the background and parts of the sky. There is a dark orange color, which is a blend of red, representing the setting sun in the background (O’Connor, 2010; O’Connor, 2012, pp. 1-5; O’Connor, 2012, pp. 4-6).

The greatest and an interesting facet of the image is the placement of the orange sun, which, despite being small and one that covers only a small area in the image, is contrasted to the artwork, as a part of the entire image. It is also portrayed as an intriguingly central part of the entire painting, as well as the clearest element, as shown through the image, which may have been used to show the impression of a landscape under the spotlight rather than a rendition. The color blending used for the picture is also representative of the weather and lighting conditions, which portray the interest and the liking of the artist (Feisner, 2000; Gage, 2000; O’Connor, 2012, pp. 1-5).

Color categories

The colors that are dominant in the image include blends of red, green, and blue. These colors fall under the cool and warm colors category, and their attributes are used to portray a given intended message or impression. The blend of blue used in the image is used to represent the attributes of peacefulness and importance. For instance, the water and the background sky at the back of the image are portrayed as calm and essential to the whole system and the impression portrayed. The warm color used throughout the image, green, is used to give the impression of the environment, harmony of the portrayed systems, health, and growth.

For instance, the green color is used to represent the plant life in the area and its relationship with the other objects on the image. The green blend of colors is also used to show the kind of environment, the growth, harmony, and most likely the healthy status of the area shown through the image. Using Gestalt’s model, the objects shown in the image can be viewed as organized and structured into a whole, rather than independent parts (O’Connor, 2010, pp. 1-3). For example, the vegetation is shown as connected to the stream, which is the medium on which the canoe is floating over (Livingstone, 2002; Livingstone, 1988; Kopacz, 2006).

In the aspect of color concerning luminance, it may seem that the sun is the brightest section on the image, but is true of similar luminance to that of the incorporated parts of the sky when checked using a photometer. For instance, if you make the image a black and white portrait, the sun disappears relatively completely. Therefore, this makes the image a very realistic quality representation, as the cortex of most mammal brains registers luminance as opposed to color, meaning that the sun would become invisible to it (Hard, Sivik, & Tonnquist, 1996; Schwarz & Kuehni, 2008).

The impressionist nature of the image is also clear from the portrayal of a disappearing horizon, the sky, reflections, and the water, which are portrayed as fully matching together. The ships and the buildings shown in the background part of the image are more of vague additions, as the red-orange sun dominates the artwork (Albers, 1963; Hard, Sivik, & Tonnquist, 1996). This can identify with Monet’s comment that his aim was not portraying an accurate landscape, but a representation of the image, the feelings, the impression, and outlook perceived while looking at the work.

This hidden meaning, therefore, is represented through this artwork, which communicates an impression, as the painting looks more of a sketch, giving the impression of the idea or message they are communicating, more than an artwork that is explicit in its meaning (O’Connor, 2012, pp. 3-5; Gage, 1995).

Conclusion

The image is a well-thought piece, that exhibits some interesting facts, the blend of colors in the image being the most visible. The colors blend very well, and this brings out clearly, the intended impression of the image. The contents of the image fit into Gestalt’s model’s requirements, where using the model, the objects in the image can be viewed as organized and structured. This proves that the image is a well thought and organized piece of artwork.

References

Albers, J. (1963). The interaction of color. New Haven, NY: Yale University Press.

Feisner, E. A. (2000). Color: How to use color in art and design. London: Laurence King.

Gage, J. (1995). Color and culture. London: Thames & Hudson.

Gage, J. (2000). Color and Meaning: Art, science, and symbolism. London: Thames & Hudson.

Hard, A., Sivik, L., & Tonnquist, G. (1996). NCS, Natural color system – from concept to research and applications. Color Research and Application, 21 (3), 180-205.

Kopacz, J. (2006). Colour in Three – Dimensional Design. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

Livingstone, M. (2002). Vision and art: The biology of seeing. New York: Abrams.

Livingstone, M. S. (1988). Art, illusion, and the visual system. Scientific American, 258 (3), 78-85.

Maund, B. (2006). The Illusory of colors: An Anti- Realist Theory. Michigan: Proquest.

O’Connor, Z. (2010). Gestalt theories of visual perception & the role of color; Gestalt theories of perception & color. Zena O’Connor, 4 (5), 1-3.

O’Connor, Z. (2010). The experience of color: Exploring the notion of theory about theories of color. Zena O’Connor, 5 (6), 4-7.

O’Connor, Z. (2012). Color & symbolic association: Color & individual differences; Color & cultural differences: Color & symbolic association. Zena O’Connor, 6 (7), 3-5.

O’Connor, Z. (2012). Exploring complementary color &contrasting color in depth Itten’s seven types of contrast: Exploring contrast in depth. Zena O’Connor, 7 (8), 4-6.

O’Connor, Z. (2012). Perceptual effects & color: Applications in art, design & Architecture: Perceptual effects & color. Zena O’Connor, 8 (9), 1-5.

Schwarz, A., & Kuehni, R. (2008). Colour ordered a survey of color order systems from Antiquity to the present. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

This report on Colors in “Impression, Sunrise” by Claude Monet was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.
Removal Request
If you are the copyright owner of this paper and no longer wish to have your work published on IvyPanda.
Request the removal

Need a custom Report sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar

certified writers online

Cite This paper

Select a referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2021, January 18). Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/colors-in-impression-sunrise-by-claude-monet/

Work Cited

"Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet." IvyPanda, 18 Jan. 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/colors-in-impression-sunrise-by-claude-monet/.

1. IvyPanda. "Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet." January 18, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/colors-in-impression-sunrise-by-claude-monet/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet." January 18, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/colors-in-impression-sunrise-by-claude-monet/.

References

IvyPanda. 2021. "Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet." January 18, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/colors-in-impression-sunrise-by-claude-monet/.

References

IvyPanda. (2021) 'Colors in "Impression, Sunrise" by Claude Monet'. 18 January.

More related papers
Psst... Stuck with your
assignment? 😱
Hellen
Online
Psst... Stuck with your assignment? 😱
Do you need an essay to be done?
What type of assignment 📝 do you need?
How many pages (words) do you need? Let's see if we can help you!