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Connection between respiratory diseases and environmental variables Research Paper


Asthma is a condition characterized by obstruction of airflow leading to coughing, chest pain, breathlessness as well as panting. It is a state caused by environmental as well as genetic factors. Asthmatic features are classified depending on symptoms and the level of forced expiratory volume per every second.

This paper tries to link asthma with climatic variables such as dust particles in the air and other microorganisms. Management of severe signs is generally with the use of an inhaler. More fatal symptoms are referred to a medical practitioner, since they may require advanced attention (Marenco et al., 1997, pp. 6875-6886). Management practices of asthma should include avoiding triggers such as allergies and irritants.

Studies have linked the Asian sand dust and minerals to allergic effects in the lungs (Takamura, Sasano, & Hayasaka, 1994, pp. 7132-7140). Studies also show that Particles of Arizona sand dust caused an insignificant increase of neutrophiles while the Asian sand dust showed no effect by itself (Derbyshire, 2007, pp. 73-77).

Thus, there is proposition that allergic inflammation are brought about by mineral dust and elements. According to scientists, sand dusts may directly influence human health through allergic stimulation of respiratory pressure (Al Frayh, Shakoor, ElRab, & Hasnain, 2001, pp. 292-296). To support this affirmation, there is increased number of patients admitted, as well as clinic visits for asthma related complications, during Asian dust storm.

More so, high-energy storm setting in dry areas can lead to the mobilization of large amounts of soils into the environment which has a wider dispersion in the world. This therefore confirms the ability of dust particles in the air to cause effect large distances from the source (Griffin, 2007, pp. 459-477). However, higher risk rests to the persons living next to the source environs. Asian dust contains alumina and silica particles, which have been reported to cause inflammatory reactions in the lungs.

Besides, Asian dust encloses a mixture of chemical composite, such as sulfate and nitrate, which confine acidic gases (Ichinose et al., 2008, pp. 348-357). In addition, Asian dust has organic components such as fungi, viruses as well as bacteria, which can directly impact the immune system of individuals who get exposed. A study on the Asian sand dust found elements of quartz, which is reported to cause inflammatory reactions in the lungs due to the presence of cytokines (Ichinose et al., 2008, pp. 685-694).

Those people suffering from asthma since childhood are at greater risk of being affected by environmental allergies. There is a growing concern in Japan on the likely connection of allergies and Asian dust, which has supposedly resulted to stern respiratory ill health in human beings. Atmospheric contact to Asian sand dust containing silica may influence allergic stimulation of respiratory strain.

Dust in household bedrooms and kitchen is a main cause of asthma in adults. This is because it contains toxins from dust on bed sheets, cushion, pillows as well as bedroom floors. Another root of asthma is the dust mites which leave their droppings everywhere they go (Prospero et al., 2008, pp. 823-832).

Muck from dust mites contains enzymes, which cause allergic infections. Dust particles are minute and can thus accumulate even in neat rooms and surfaces. Kids are more vigorous and spend most of their time in the open air. This makes them more exposed to infection from breathing polluted air (Tecer, Alagha, Karaca, Tuncel, & Eldes, 2008, pp. 512-520). Biologically, the outer boundaries of respiratory tract in children are more prone to irritation when exposed to polluted air than adults.

The Nose and the air tracks have a protective layer of epithelium with mucus to clean air and prevent damage from dust particles (Rutherford, Clark, McTainsh, Simpson, & Mitchell, 1999, pp. 217-225). This makes alveoli more susceptible to environmental elements than the nose and respiratory tract because they lack the protection layer.

The current study confirms the result of higher age on declining remission of the cough indicators (Gyan et al., 2005, pp. 371-376). The cough signs can be interpreted as indicators of inflammatory practices as well as stimuli to irritants. Irreversible damage may be caused by smoking; however, cessation does not always have a beneficial effect.

In conclusion, this paper suggested that heavy dust particles are considerably associated with the amplified risk of asthma (Eagan, Gulsvik, Eide, & Bakke, 2002, pp. 933-938). There should be an awareness campaign of the health implications of heavy desert dust exposure to minimize the risk of toxic effects. Other components to keep off include; fine fibers, pollen granules, dried leaves, animal fur as well as pets’ urine.

References

Al Frayh, A. R., Shakoor, Z., ElRab, M. O., & Hasnain, S. M. (2001). Increased prevalence of asthma in Saudi Arabia. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 86(3), 292-296. Web.

Derbyshire, E. (2007). . AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment, 36(1), 73-77. Web.

Eagan, T. M., Gulsvik, A., Eide, G. E., & Bakke, P. S. (2002). . American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 166(7), 933-938. Web.

Griffin, D. W. (2007). Atmospheric movement of microorganisms in clouds of desert dust and implications for human health. Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 20(3), 459-477. Web.

Gyan, K., Henry, W., Lacaille, S., Laloo, A., Lamsee-Ebanks, C., McKay, S., & Monteil, M. A. (2005). African dust clouds are associated with increased paediatric asthma accident and emergency admissions on the Caribbean island of Trinidad. International journal of biometeorology, 49(6), 371-376. Web.

Ichinose, T., Yoshida, S., Hiyoshi, K., Sadakane, K., Takano, H., Nishikawa, M., & Shibamoto, T. (2008). . Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology, 55(3), 348-357. Web.

Ichinose, T., Yoshida, S., Sadakane, K., Takano, H., Yanagisawa, R., Inoue, K., & Shibamoto, T. (2008). Effects of asian sand dust, Arizona sand dust, amorphous silica and aluminum oxide on allergic inflammation in the murine lung. Inhalation toxicology, 20(7), 685-694. Web.

Marenco, F., Santacesaria, V., Bais, A. F., Balis, D., di Sarra, A., Papayannis, A., & Zerefos, C. (1997). (Photochemical Activity and Solar Ultraviolet Radiation campaign). Applied Optics, 36(27), 6875-6886. Web.

Prospero, J. M., Blades, E., Naidu, R., Mathison, G., Thani, H., & Lavoie, M. C. (2008). . International journal of biometeorology, 52(8), 823-832.

Rutherford, S., Clark, E., McTainsh, G., Simpson, R., & Mitchell, C. (1999). , Australia. International journal of biometeorology, 42(4), 217-225. Web.

Takamura, T., Sasano, Y., & Hayasaka, T. (1994). . Applied Optics, 33(30), 7132-7140. Web.

Tecer, L. H., Alagha, O., Karaca, F., Tuncel, G., & Eldes, N. (2008). . Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 71(8), 512-520. Web.

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IvyPanda. (2020, May 6). Connection between respiratory diseases and environmental variables. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/connection-between-respiratory-diseases-and-environmental-variables/

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IvyPanda. "Connection between respiratory diseases and environmental variables." May 6, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/connection-between-respiratory-diseases-and-environmental-variables/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Connection between respiratory diseases and environmental variables." May 6, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/connection-between-respiratory-diseases-and-environmental-variables/.

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IvyPanda. (2020) 'Connection between respiratory diseases and environmental variables'. 6 May.

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