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Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective Essay


As the executive chef for this hotel and resort corporation, applications for vacancies in the firm fall under my jurisdiction. Most of the respondents for the recently advertised supervisory vacancies are females from your culinary institution. We are also privileged to have a majority of our male employees who are graduates from your institution.

What is however disheartening is the reaction of these male employees on hearing that many of the supervisory posts applicants are females. The prospect of them being under supervision of female(s) does not augur well with them. This is definitely a shocker and it is really unbelievable that such a mentality still exists in today’s world.

Gender inequality which basically refers to open or concealed inequality between persons on the grounds of gender should not be an issue in this modern world (Centra and Gaubatz, 2003, p. 17). Graduates, and especially males, from your kind of institution are expected to be enlightened and are not expected to show any form of discrimination. They are expected to be way above such unacceptable practices at these times.

I would kindly like to give an insight on how this can be dealt with through various practices and training of students while they are still in the institution so that such instances does not occur elsewhere in future (Centra and Gaubatz, 2003, p. 18). Slotting into evocative discussion about gender of the tutors or lecturers with students will serve to prepare these young men and women to operate in a society that has turned more diverse and universal. It is the duty of the tutor to craft a lecture-room environment that serves to enhance meaningful discussions concerning gender.

As the society progressively turns to be global, learning institutions have an obligation to embrace gender diversity. Such an inclusiveness calls for both tutoring and gaining knowledge about gender issues. The seriousness with which most of these institutions seek to root for gender sensitivity is often debatable (Hernandez, 2001, p. 12). However, there is little doubt that involving students in meaningful discussions on gender will read them to fit in a society that is progressively getting more diverse.

So as to participate in any meaningful discussion about gender, the learners first need check their own convictions and mind-sets. Quite a large number of them do join learning institutions with already biased beliefs concerning given genders (Boerman-Cornell, 1999, p. 66).

This attitude definitely is carried into the lecture rooms. In today’s interdisciplinary class set ups, this poses problems mainly due to the following; convictions touching on gender attributes are not supported by any evidence at almost all times and such beliefs are opposed to change.

What makes this even more serious is that once the learners have shaped convictions concerning gender, they are stubborn toward differing explanations. It has also been proved that when information to counter their gender convictions is presented to them, it actually serves to reinforce their biased beliefs. This means that the lecturers have to do what it takes to counter learner resilience when talking about gender issues.

It has earlier been stated that it is normally the tutor’s duty to craft a lecture-room environment that enhances meaningful discussions concerning gender. Learners should be readied for the twofold activity of scholarly proficiency and experimental understanding (Hernandez, 2001, p. 14).

A good beginning point for tutors is to develop an open discussion concerning gender by getting into a more broad debate on gender attitudes. This is normally attained by enhancing learner aptitude and at the same time promoting their critical reasoning about the hypothetical machinations that underlie debate on gender issues.

For both genders, participation in discussions on gender calls to mind negative emotions. This is despite the fact that when the learners are faced up to arguments to lessen their levels of justification means, a reflective interpersonal set up of learning and development comes up (Centra and Gaubatz, 2003, p. 32).

For tutors to engage in significant discussions about race with the learners there are usually three aspects they need to have in mind. The first one is the lecturer/learner interaction. Coming up with a constructive association with learners in any course needs to take place on two stages.

The first one is to recognize the learners as a set. The tutor needs to be aware of grouping adherence and arrange for the ones who find it hard to conform to group pressure (Hernandez, 2001, p. 23). The second level points to individual contact between the tutor and the learner. Learning best takes place when there is a good rapport between the learner and his or her tutor.

The second aspect that tutors need to facilitate is attentive skills. This is achieved by way of voicing and body language (Boerman-Cornell, 1999, p. 69). Body and voice language also includes eye contact and the tutor must be attentive for nonverbal reactions from learners.

The third and final aspect that tutors need to embrace is different teaching styles. This is due to the fact that students learn best in various ways. There are those who are at home with visual presentations, those comfortable working in groups and those who get the points best by way of reading (Boerman-Cornell, 1999, p. 69).

Reference List

Boerman-Cornell, W. (1999). “The five humors.” English Journal, 88: 66-69.

Centra, J. and Gaubatz, N. (2003). “Is there Gender Bias in Student Evaluations of Teaching?” Journal of Higher Education 70 (1) 17-33.

Hernandez, H. (2001). “Multicultural education: A teacher’s guide to linking context, process and content.” Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. 12-23.

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IvyPanda. (2020, July 8). Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/equality-inequality-social-and-cultural-stratification-from-a-global-perspective/

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"Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective." IvyPanda, 8 July 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/equality-inequality-social-and-cultural-stratification-from-a-global-perspective/.

1. IvyPanda. "Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective." July 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/equality-inequality-social-and-cultural-stratification-from-a-global-perspective/.


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IvyPanda. "Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective." July 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/equality-inequality-social-and-cultural-stratification-from-a-global-perspective/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective." July 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/equality-inequality-social-and-cultural-stratification-from-a-global-perspective/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Social, Cultural and Gender Inequality from a Global Perspective'. 8 July.

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