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Induced beauty as a Social Problem Essay


Literature indicates that the connection between a thin body image and extreme prettiness amongst the majority of American women has culminated into an undesirable consequence on their self-esteem and dieting parameters. Concurrently, women are striving to attain the beauty associated with a thin body to an extent that it ultimately becomes a vice.

It is crucial for the Society to make it clear that being extremely skinny is not pretty. Trends pertaining to slimming are engraved in women thus making it a social problem. Regardless of the fact that the condition poses concerns to individuals, its practice is based on the inability of the victims to deduce right from wrong. Although there are numerous discussions about body image in America, too many of them show flaws in their reasoning by equating thinness with beauty.

The predicament is a product of societal influence, culture, peer pressure, and unmatched fantasies. Leon-Guerrero (10) indicates that celebrities and other normal citizenry focus on the purported beauty, which is attributed to individuals being thin. The intention of this imitation is to bring forth the associated happiness, which the superstars enjoy (Leon-Guerrero 10). Another aspect is the nature and behavior of women demonstrated as shyness and undue pretence, which deters them from eating sufficiently.

Leon-Guerrero (10) posits that they avoid association with negating characters. An acknowledged misconception is that most women think that the only reason why people are endeared to public icons is their induced thinness. Evidently, this parameter of reasoning is adrift and concomitantly meets the due resistance from the society, which embraces it. Concurrently, skinniness educes no beauty but self-harm.

Jack (121) insinuates that several factions believe that skinnier women necessitate more attention, upon comparison to others. Crucial insight indicates that such reasoning is illogical hence a mere cover. Alongside this, not only do thin celebrities enjoy perfect life, languish in fame, or liked by so many as perceived, but also other personalities exist whose fame is not pegged on body weight, size, and ill-fated beauty.

Jack offers a solution by highlighting that such irrational thoughts and actions demand complete realignment thus addressing concerns. The logic deduces better improvements if specialists are involved in the eating habits and fitness activities. Experts can advice on the kind of meals to take, which comes after medical examination to elucidate the health conditions of the involved party (Jack 121)

Craik (235) posits that the core influencing factors in the slimming and beauty concern is peer pressure, attitude, and the magazines published with beautiful celebrities on their covers. It is with great concern that the perceived superstars do not look similar to the photos used in the adverts, magazines, and the newspapers.

Craik further asserts that the photos endure intensive retouching and editing that transforms the involved star into another superhuman thus portraying exclusive beauty. When relented to scrutiny and critical reasoning, the society may fail to acknowledge such irrationalities. This points out that women focus on unnatural processes; furthermore, their efforts are unlikely to attain the desired ends.

Clark (235) equally asserts that women who are obsessed with such images and photos consider them real thus failing to respond to the comments educed by the critics and experts. Critically, women should cease the detrimental efforts to match their fantasy; more so, beauty entails more than thinness.

The fascinating titles like how to lose weight without altering your diet, avenues to perfect body shapes, and how to live better by being skinny, are creatively composed to give the impression that thinness is what women need. Such reasoning calls for critical scrutiny thus viewed as just empty words because the cost involved in achieving such a prescribed desire is full of predicaments when considered from a health dimension.

Clark (236) posits that such a problem poses health concerns to significant proportions of the populace. Most women compare themselves to the tremendously lean celebrities and models; furthermore, they perceive themselves as chubby. They contrast themselves with the models under the misperception that such models are the best, and by not matching them, they occupy a diminished societal status. This culminates in unnecessary imitation.

LeVitus (100) poses concerns pertaining to the thoughts that characterize women. Consequently, they believe that they are abnormal or unattractive incase their pose and physique do not match their preferred icons. Such reasoning is baseless, and misleading since everybody enjoys an exclusive physique, which is distinct and cannot be copied.

Evidently, it is hard to match any two related individuals. In reality, these women are normal and when subjected to body mass index calculator (BMI), they gauge and conform customarily to their obligatory body mass. The efforts to lose extra body weight sometimes masquerades untold problems hence the raised concern from the community (LeVitus 100).

Craik (235) asserts that It is with great concern that the perceived superstars really look no similar to the photos used in the adverts, magazines, and the newspapers. However, he is swift to dismiss that notions created by the media is not wholly responsible for such a viewpoint.

The photos endure intensive retouching and editing that transforms the involved star into another superhuman, which portrays nothing but an exclusive beauty (Craik 235). When relented to scrutiny and critical reasoning, none really gazes that wonderful and incredible physique.

This points out that whoever women have been striving to match is unnatural hence their efforts can only achieve no success but harm. It is amazing that most women who are obsessed with such images and photos deem that they are real and do not respond to the comments educed by the critics and experts. Critically, women should cease the detrimental efforts to match their fantasy; more so, beauty entails more than slimming.

Women exude negative health tendencies arising from malnutrition due to their efforts to become slim. Evidently, this is fatal and threatening. The body endures scarcity of fundamental nutrients vital for the healthy development. Cho (49) highlights that it is questionable why an individual would adopt beauty strategies and ideologies but die of malnutrition in a while.

Occasionally, some women imitate “Barbie dolls,” which are not even human beings. Cho (49) indicates that modeling women rarely eat and if they do, the quantity is minimal. Some even smoke in the society against all the odds. The reasoning subsequent to this mission is weary since it considers that by eating well, one is vulnerable of growing fatter. Most women are unable to put up with this consequence because of beauty mindedness.

The common argument fronted by the slimming women, is that artists who are not slim enjoy less fame, upon comparison to the lean ones, such a concern only illuminates misguided thought. Concurrently, Loseke (10) indicates that the fact that most models are skinny and beautiful is full of uncertainty and vividly relates to metaphysics. More so, the fact that most societies recognize women’s perfection and beauty in terms of skinniness elicits minimal truth.

This reasoning is quite alienated; furthermore, it promotes societal concerns. Applying tradition and conformity to this matter may distract critical reasoning thus hindering the scrutiny of such a claim. The best way to improve a constructive reasoning with regard to such a concept is to consider and illuminate all the facts related to the issue and evaluating its impact as a social problem. The phobia rendering women to doubt the guarantee of love from their men if they increase weight is idealess and a complete naive romanticism.

Loseke indicates that it is unreasonable to endure all tactics available with the intention of losing weight. Some may culminate in adverse effects, which are unhealthy. Most women accomplish this without taking precautions and addressing the possible repercussions to their health.

A significant proportion goes as far as missing meals for a whole day. The induction of this irrationality is by static reasoning, which deviates from current social attitudes, practices, and realities. Critical reasoning, when rendered to use, offers capability of recognizing the undue efforts as well as unworthy lifestyle.

The characters worshiped include disproportionate exercising, eating disorders, excessive consumption of laxatives, chain smoking, and frequent gym attendance. These encounter significant criticism when subjected to critical reasoning as a constituent of measures employed in solving social problems (Loseke 10). Such decisions are of no value when scrutinized critically.

Ashok (83) affirms that the principle of “agreeing to disagree” necessitates one to spot a common ground amid two contrasting issues. This poses greater debate when statistical figures require some derivation. The calculation of body mass indices for underweight models, healthy range people, overweight, as well as stout persons indicate numerous distinctive figures.

BMI is a reflection of body masterpiece. Body mass (kg) divided by tallness (m) squared grants a particular BMI of a person. Higher figures indicate overweight (Ashok 83). Statistics has it that when the figures are < 20 and < 19 for both male and female genders respectively, the entity is underweight. 20-25 for males and 19-24 for females, the individual is in a healthy range. Overweight, 26-30 men and 25-30 women. The obese has > 30 for the two genders (Ashok 84).

Edelman & Mandle (11) illustrate that the BMI is useful in determining health risks allied to the extreme values derived from calculations. It is simple and only employs standard measurements. Women have taken the issue of provoked emaciation to advanced levels, involving themselves in everything possible to lose weight.

In the models arena, the underweight are more than other weight rating in number (Edelman & Mandle 11). Such statistics are data-driven. Data-driven reasoning is only troubled with raw numbers or cold instrumental analysis hence futile at dealing with actual human concerns.

In conclusion, diverse literature posit that women associate thinness with beauty, hence trying every possible strategy to lose weight. This has culminated in a social problem eliciting critical evaluation. Most women believe that happiness lies on the body size, which in turn makes the thin one prevails.

Super depicted celebs, believed to be leading a happy life as models, are the greatest influence in this sector. American women need to pursue the degree of self-confidence that women of other cultures have so that America women can trim down the detrimental effects of such misperception.

On recommendation, critical reasoning associated with such a social problem ought to shun obsession, drugs, unjustified dieting, and unnecessary comparison with others. Media should rationalize on individual beauty and dampen celebrity imitation. Concurrently, one should define her own unique beauty. Everyone is gorgeous in his/her own manner and it only requires self-belief to achieve this.

Work Cited

Ashok, Chinanna. Test Your Physical Fitness. Delhi: Gyan Publishing House, 2008. Print.

Cho, Susan. Weight Control and Slimming Ingredients in Food Technology. Iowa, IA: John Wiley and Sons, 2010. Print.

Craik, Jennifer. Fashion: The Key Concepts. New York, NY: Berg Publishers, 2009. Print.

Edelman, Carole & Mandle, Carol. Health promotion throughout the life span. Philadelphia, PA:Elsevier Health Sciences, 2005. Print.

Jack, Kathleen. Common Sense Slimming. Florida, FL: Xulon Press, 2009. Print.

Leon-Guerrero, Anne. Social Problems: Community, Policy, and Social Action. California, CA: Pine Forge Press, 2010. Print.

LeVitus, Bob. Incredible IPhone Apps For Dummies. New Jersey, NJ: For Dummies, 2010. Print.

Loseke, Donileen. Thinking about social problems: an introduction to constructionist Perspectives. New York, NY: Transaction Publishers, 2003. Print.

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IvyPanda. (2019, March 13). Induced beauty as a Social Problem. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/induced-beauty-as-a-social-problem/

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"Induced beauty as a Social Problem." IvyPanda, 13 Mar. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/induced-beauty-as-a-social-problem/.

1. IvyPanda. "Induced beauty as a Social Problem." March 13, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/induced-beauty-as-a-social-problem/.


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IvyPanda. "Induced beauty as a Social Problem." March 13, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/induced-beauty-as-a-social-problem/.

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IvyPanda. 2019. "Induced beauty as a Social Problem." March 13, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/induced-beauty-as-a-social-problem/.

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IvyPanda. (2019) 'Induced beauty as a Social Problem'. 13 March.

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