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Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World Essay


One of the most outstanding cultural outputs of the Islamicate world is Ottoman architecture. This architecture emerged after the formation of the Ottoman Empire in 1300. The pioneer locations of this architecture were Edirne and Bursa. The Ottomans specialized in creating inner spaces under huge domes, and such a thing had not happened in the Islamicate world before. Hitherto, most buildings and especially mosques as they were important aspects at the time, entailed mainly ordinary buildings, but highly decorated.

However, with the entry of the use of domes and vaults, which were common with the Ottoman architecture, both inside and outside space, was redefined. Mosques were redesigned from the earlier dark chambers to beautifully constructed domes with well-defined light and dark areas. Across the entire Asia Minor, different forms of mosques emerged based on the Ottoman architecture.

This emerging form of architecture was well received across the region with Mimar Sinan at the helm whereby he came up with numerous ideas concerning this form of art. With such revolutionary architectural wave sweeping across Asia Minor, other regions became interested and adopted it. The classical Ottoman architecture was widely accepted in Tunisia, Hungary, Algiers, and Egypt. The west did not receive the classical version of this architecture, but with modernization, this form of art slowly penetrated the west as explored next.

With modernization and peace, the Ottoman Empire started to form bilateral associations with western countries. France was the first country to associate with the Ottoman Empire. Consequently, the Ottoman architecture started influencing its French counterpart.

However, architects from France modified the classical Ottoman architectural designs and incorporated the Rococo and Baroque trends, which were popular across Europe. The most outstanding product of the modification of the classical Ottoman architecture is the renowned Divrigi hospital. The key architect of the Baroque-Ottoman architecture in France was Mellin, and he traveled to Istanbul, where he cemented his interests in this newly found form of art.

During the Tulip period, the modernized Ottoman architecture spread widely across Europe. Even back in Turkey where it originated, different places hitherto preserved for the elites were opened for the ordinary citizens to visit. Therefore, the architecture became common across Asia Minor, where public recreational areas like Kagithane were constructed using this form of architecture.

Baroque-Ottoman architecture became popular between 1757 and 1808 during the Baroque period. During this time, the architectural designs spread to Italy and other major European countries. Ultimately, the Ottoman architecture underwent a revolution during the National Architectural Renaissance, which occurred in the latter years of the 19th century.

Modern structural techniques started taking root, and this move brought revival to the classical Ottoman architecture. Architects started using modern materials like glass and steel. However, even though the materials changed, the new designs borrowed heavily from the classical architecture of the 12th century. The reception of the new modified classical Ottoman architectural designs was good as people across Europe and Africa embraced the architecture and started incorporating it in their constructions.

In conclusion, the Ottoman architecture emerged after the birth of the Ottoman Empire in 1300. It replaced the conventional architecture, which mainly entailed ordinary buildings with intense beautification. This new form of architecture specialized in creating both inside and outside spaces. The architecture experienced good reception beyond Turkey where it emerged. France became the first country to incorporate the Ottoman architecture in its designs with modifications under the influence of the Baroque designs.

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IvyPanda. (2020, April 8). Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/ottoman-architecture-in-the-islamicate-world/

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"Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World." IvyPanda, 8 Apr. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/ottoman-architecture-in-the-islamicate-world/.

1. IvyPanda. "Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World." April 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ottoman-architecture-in-the-islamicate-world/.


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IvyPanda. "Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World." April 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ottoman-architecture-in-the-islamicate-world/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World." April 8, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ottoman-architecture-in-the-islamicate-world/.

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IvyPanda. (2020) 'Ottoman Architecture in the Islamicate World'. 8 April.

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