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Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change Case Study


Introduction

Economic impetus behind environmental exploitations by developing nations in pursuit for opportunities has made conservatives to develop and implement Payment for Environmental Service programs which offer financial compensation to the nations that avoid the exploitations (OEC 90). Arguably, the most prominent scheme is REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) which is an approach of imposing a price-tag on carbon storage provided by forests.

Recently, the scope of REDD has broadened and recognizes carbon benefits reaped from sustainable forestry efforts. This case study investigates the partnership between Norway & Indonesia being the largest example of REDD. It attempts to answer two questions: What were the motives and goals behind the partnership? What are the achievements of the partnership?

Norway-Indonesia REDD partnership

The REDD partnership between Norway and Indonesia was initiated in 2010 when the two governments signed a letter of intent that would contribute to substantial reductions in carbon emissions from three activities: deforestation, forest deprivation and peat-land transformation in Indonesia (Cunningham & Cunningham 189).

This agreement was divided into three phases supposed to end in 2014 under Norwegian financing. According to this agreement, Indonesia should implement a program to suspend all new businesses for the conversion of natural and peat forests. The objective of this program is to establish a baseline on vital aspects of forest and peat-lands that is deliberate to the effective execution of REDD strategy national wide.

This partnership provides an exceptional opportunity for Indonesia to moderate its deforestation and greenhouse gas emission levels. Nevertheless, the partnership has also aroused fierce debates within the society concerning the scope of the program especially in defining forest as well as its socioeconomic and environmental implications.

The pilot province selected for the implementation of the programs was Central Kalimantan due to the high rates of forest degradation, large stretches of rainforests and peat-lands, the progressed state of test projects in carbon change and political interest in environment degradation.

The suspension according to the requirements outlined in phase two was signed by the Indonesian president and put into effect in 2011. This was accompanied by an indicative map displaying the areas covered by the suspension program.

Despite the benefits expected from the program, these achievements have taken a rather intriguing course. The scope of the program is facing great criticism that it lacks clarity and transparency and the development of the indicative map presents difficulties in assessing its effectiveness in reducing carbon emissions from forest degradation.

Therefore, it is highly recommended that the two governments should adopt a flexible, transparent and user-friendly program for investigating the ramifications associated with the implementation of REDD program under different clarifications and situations. Such a cohesive tool can also enhance future revisions of the program and the inductive map.

Conclusion

The REDD partnership between Norway and Indonesia is an outcome of the pressing need to reduce carbon emissions resulting from deforestation. The program involves three phases to be accomplished after 2014.

The program is already in the second phase with remarkable achievements such as the acceptance of the program by the Indonesian president and creation of an indicative map outlining the area under pilot study. Unfortunately, the program is faced up with issues of clarity and transparency which obliges the two governments to adopt strategic tools to mitigate the shortcomings.

Works Cited

Cunningham, William and Cunningham Mary. Environmental Science: A Global Concern. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Company Inc, 2011. Print.

Organization for Economic Cooperation. The Economics of Climate Change Mitigation: Policies and Options for Global Action Beyond 2012. Paris, France: OECD Publishing, 2009. Print.

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IvyPanda. (2019, October 15). Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/protecting-forests-to-prevent-climate-change/

Work Cited

"Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change." IvyPanda, 15 Oct. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/protecting-forests-to-prevent-climate-change/.

1. IvyPanda. "Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change." October 15, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/protecting-forests-to-prevent-climate-change/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change." October 15, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/protecting-forests-to-prevent-climate-change/.

References

IvyPanda. 2019. "Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change." October 15, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/protecting-forests-to-prevent-climate-change/.

References

IvyPanda. (2019) 'Protecting Forests to Prevent Climate Change'. 15 October.

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