Home > Free Essays > Sociology > Immigration > Social Issues of the Immigration Journal
5 min
Cite This

Social Issues of the Immigration Journal Essay

StarStarStarStarStar

Social Sciences

Bosma, U., and Alferink, M. (2011). Multiculturalism and Settlement: The Case of Dutch Postcolonial Migrant Organisations. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 13(3), 265-283. Web.

The authors studied the impacts of multiculturalism of the period 1980s to 1990s on institutional forms of immigrants in the Netherlands. They wanted to test the assumption that the action of the Dutch government led to the fragmentation of immigrant institutions. The topic was critical because of the nature of multiculturalism politics, which had supposedly backed migrant institutions. As a result, such institutions had become fragmented, and it was difficult to note their roles in the integration process.

The study methodology involved a methodical review of accessible information regarding the postcolonial movement of people and institutions from 1945 to 2008. Data reviewed represented nearly 40 percent of all post-war immigrants who originated from other continents other than Europe. However, data only focused on a specific segment of the immigrant populations.

The researchers concluded that the development of postcolonial immigrant institutions was notable since the 1980s. However, it was difficult to relate the growth or fragmented migrant institutions with the minority policies of the Dutch government.

From this study, one could note that the growth that occurred to immigrants in the Netherlands resulted from changes in emerging identity issues and developments in political identities. It also highlighted that policies for immigrants introduced in the Netherlands did not create any favorable conditions, but were rejected without any proper explanations.

While this study used data for specific immigrants, the findings proved that the Dutch government policies on immigrants did not serve their intended purposes. The study also relied on massive historical data to derive such conclusions, but it could difficult to generalize this conclusion to other countries.

Decker, S., van Gemert, F., and Pyrooz, D. C. (2009). Gangs, Migration, and Crime: The Changing Landscape in Europe and the USA. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 10(4), 393-408. Web.

Decker and colleagues examined the association between immigration, culture, and gangs and compared the outcomes between the US and Europe. The researchers believed that immigration, culture, and ethnicity were imperative elements to comprehend such changes, but other structural factors were only conditional elements for the perceived changes. The study also showed diverse patterns of immigrants in the US and Europe.

The study methodology was based on a conceptual framework with a focus on reviewing several qualitative studies. The methodology covered fundamental aspects that defined the dynamic landscape of gangs and their formation concerning the local context. The framework looked at factors that facilitated gang formation or essential conditions that ensured that a group of people would come together to form a gang.

The study result showed that immigration patterns had significant impacts on the US and European gang activities. As a result, the researchers concluded that diverse patterns of immigration and the movement of people had certain impacts on economic, political, ad cultural outcomes. Specifically, the study showed that immigration, ethnic affiliation, and cultures played critical roles in specific areas in which threats, mistrust, fear, and conflict were common because of arriving populations. The study emphasized that an environment, which displayed such factors and poor structural elements of society as covered under social disorganization theories were the perfect places for gang formation and activities.

An insight from the study showed that immigrants were reacting to new conditions, which were established by the natives.

The study borrowed from social science to reflect immigrants and gang formations under their living environments and the role of the natives in the formation of such gangs.

The study conceptual framework and several studies reviewed ensured that the conclusion was reliable and reflected common outcomes.

Richter, M., Chersich, M., Vearey, J., Sartorius, B., Temmerman, M., and Luchters, S. (2014). Migration Status, Work Conditions, and Health Utilization of Female Sex Workers in Three South African Cities. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1), 7-17. Web.

The study assessed certain structural indicators of vulnerability among migrant female sex workers (FSWs) with specific reference to their economic situations and working environments. It also explored whether there was variation in gaining access to healthcare services among natives, internal migrants, and cross-border migrants.

The study methodology involved the use of cross-sectional surveys among self-identified female commercial sex workers during the time of the FIFA 2010 Soccer World Cup in South Africa. There were few but significant changes in demographics at the time. Cities for the study included Johannesburg, Hillbrow, Sandton, and Cape Town. These locations provided unique characteristics needed for the study of FSWs. A semi-structured questionnaire with 43 items was administered to almost 60 FSWs. Researchers obtained their informed consent before the study.

The results indicated that more than half of female sex workers were from other countries (cross-border migrants). Also, findings showed the predominance of sex work among migrants, particularly cross-border migrants. The study pointed out the need to provide specific health services for commercial sex workers with a specific focus on the migrant population and address HIV/STI prevention. Further, it also highlighted the need to engage migrant sex workers in different intervention programs and services.

From the study, the researchers discovered that relationships between sex work and migration were not adequately studied in South Africa. South Africa requires such studies because of the high rates of internal and cross-border movement of people and HIV prevalence.

Researchers indicated that the study had many limitations, including self-reporting and non-random sampling.

The authors failed to point out how they minimized potential bias in the study and its overall effect on results. Therefore, it would be difficult to generalize the outcome to a larger population.

Sanou, D., O’Reilly, E., Ngnie-Teta, I., Batal, M., Mondain, N., Andrew, C.,…Bourgeault, I. (2013). Acculturation and Nutritional Health of Immigrants in Canada: A Scoping Review. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1):24-34. Web.

The study aimed to discover knowledge gaps and areas of research priorities concerning immigrant nutritional health. The researchers observed that the latest immigrants to Canada were healthier relative to native Canadians (the Healthy Immigrant Effect). However, such immigrants experienced a decline in health conditions partly because of changes in dietary habits.

The study methodology involved the use of a scoping review in which the researchers extracted and analyzed data from 49 articles. They applied narrative synthesis rather than statistical techniques to generate findings.

Findings showed that studies in immigrant nutritional health among Canadian immigrants were in the nascent stage and could change rapidly because of critical issues that required immediate attention and evidence to support culturally suitable practices. Few available studies showed that there was a sound change in dietary practices, although some of the immigrants wanted to maintain their traditional diets.

The study concluded that a focus on these priorities could result in relevant information to guide appropriate cultural interventions in diets among Canadian immigrants. These would focus on nutritional environments, immigrants’ diverse cultural attributes, and health realities and lessen the challenge of the Healthy Immigrant Effect on the overall health of Canadians.

It adds new data to a few available studies on immigrant health status and dietary habits.

The study has a clear methodology and stages, which can be applied in similar situations in other regions.

Shier, M., Engstrom, S., and Graham, J. (2011). International migration and social work: A review of the literature. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, 9(1), 38-56. Web.

The purpose of the study was to analyze available studies concerning international migration by using specific keywords like an immigrant, migrant, and refugee within the article abstracts to select the relevant ones.

The study methodology involved the search of electronic databases for social sciences. The researchers conducted the study in October 2008. They searched for different abstracts in Social Service and Social Work databases. The researchers believed that the two were the principal databases for the social work profession, and they were the primary sources of relevant past studies to reflect direct practices in the field of social work. They reviewed 1,391 journal articles with specific keywords to identify articles that focused on immigration, refugees, and the international movement of people.

The study result indicated that there was a significant increment in the number of publications after every five years from 1985. However, the US affiliated authors wrote most of the articles (59%). They also noted that rich and depth knowledge existed in the area of migrants, immigrants, and refugee studies, specifically in four major areas, such as service delivery, demographic features, health and mental health status, and systemic issues. However, the study pointed out that the rise of diversity demanded further studies to understand changes in societal norms.

The study also noted that it was imperative to study social issues in countries of immigrants’ origin.

The study presents a systematic review of the literature and shows the need to enhance further studies due to emerging social changes.

References

Bosma, U., and Alferink, M. (2011). Multiculturalism and Settlement: The Case of Dutch Postcolonial Migrant Organisations. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 13(3), 265-283. Web.

Decker, S., van Gemert, F., and Pyrooz, D. C. (2009). Gangs, Migration, and Crime: The Changing Landscape in Europe and the USA. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 10(4), 393-408. Web.

Richter, M., Chersich, M., Vearey, J., Sartorius, B., Temmerman, M., and Luchters, S. (2014). Migration Status, Work Conditions, and Health Utilization of Female Sex Workers in Three South African Cities. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1), 7-17. Web.

Sanou, D., O’Reilly, E., Ngnie-Teta, I., Batal, M., Mondain, N., Andrew, C.,…Bourgeault, I. (2013). Acculturation and Nutritional Health of Immigrants in Canada: A Scoping Review. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 16(1):24-34. Web.

Shier, M., Engstrom, S., and Graham, J. (2011). International migration and social work: A review of the literature. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, 9(1), 38-56. Web.

This essay on Social Issues of the Immigration Journal was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.
Removal Request
If you are the copyright owner of this paper and no longer wish to have your work published on IvyPanda.
Request the removal

Need a custom Essay sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar

certified writers online

Cite This paper

Select a referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2021, February 17). Social Issues of the Immigration Journal. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/social-issues-of-the-immigration-journal/

Work Cited

"Social Issues of the Immigration Journal." IvyPanda, 17 Feb. 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/social-issues-of-the-immigration-journal/.

1. IvyPanda. "Social Issues of the Immigration Journal." February 17, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/social-issues-of-the-immigration-journal/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Social Issues of the Immigration Journal." February 17, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/social-issues-of-the-immigration-journal/.

References

IvyPanda. 2021. "Social Issues of the Immigration Journal." February 17, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/social-issues-of-the-immigration-journal/.

References

IvyPanda. (2021) 'Social Issues of the Immigration Journal'. 17 February.

More related papers
Psst... Stuck with your
assignment? 😱
Hellen
Online
Psst... Stuck with your assignment? 😱
Do you need an essay to be done?
What type of assignment 📝 do you need?
How many pages (words) do you need? Let's see if we can help you!