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Southern Secession of the United States Essay

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Updated: Jan 4th, 2022

Why did the South have to secede

The United State of America was subdivided into two major parts, which are the Southern and the Northern States. The southern region, where I belong was composed of the blacks while the Northern was occupied by the Unionists, the whites. However, the subdivision was due to the political rationale (Ewing, p. 36).

After our victory in the presidential elections of 1860, as the Southern States, we opted for secession. However, the Northern States too embraced the idea while the remaining fourteen states were in doubt of which side to belong to. However, the action of Georgia was the determinant for the disunion in the Deep South. Dixie turned to Georgia’s pre-war capital; Milledgeville, the source of the lawmaking confrontation that would pave way for civil battle (Ewing, p. 37).

After the presidential elections, we Southern States mirrored the hot debate that emerged two months before the election in which 51% of the Georgians supported secession. This was a gripping tale, very colorful to the participants following the January 19th convention that led to a historical election, 166-130 secession win in favor of Georgia. This was one of the confrontations that shed brilliant light on American history. Nevertheless, we made a historic election on how great the 16th American president was in election history, which is still remarkable to date.

However, as the Southern States, we passed through a lot of disturbance for decades due to autocracy of the republican authority perceived to be the death blows to the South. In addition, we were marginalized by the republican government; for example, the increase of tariff acts in favor of the Northern side and many more (Ferleger and Paquette, p.98).

Following the annual speech of President Buchanan in the course of action, he reiterated that congress could not force us to secede while we as the Southern States had no rights to separate. However, the secession crisis continued after Buchanan was succeeded by President Lincoln.

Why the secession was our best interest as Southerners

Due to the frustrations by the republicans, we resolved to separate with no intensions to topple the government, like South Carolina tried to secede by the 1830s. The constitutional amendments never had an option of secession; to us, this was a dictatorial rule with no state freedom on an alternative action to take if the normal operational situations fail. As a representative of Southern States, I would totally disregard the association with the republicans, due to its negative consequences (Ewing, p. 39).

Why the Northern views were wrong for the South

The Northern States perceived that they are the rulers, thus, being in the favor of the sitting president, the authority and the law-making body was composed of a republican majority rendering us speechless regardless of how mature our idea would be. However, the Northern States practiced partiality in all circumstances which hitherto the decision to separate. Moreover, they never wanted our materialization on any agendum. The Democratic president did not embrace their authoritative rule regardless of the sufferings we went through, as we had to be adamant on the union issues (Ferleger and Paquette, p.164). The struggle for our lease led to a Civil War that was not caused by slavery as many thought. The frustrations from the republican states to date still cause great misunderstanding in the American political arena (Ewing, p. 40).

Works Cited

Ewing, Elbert, Robinson William. Northern Rebellion and Southern Secession. New York: BiblioBazaar, LLC, 2009. ISBN: 1116049074, 9781116049077.

Ferleger, Lou and Paquette, L. Robert. Slavery, Secession and Southern History. Washington: University Press of Virginia, 2000.

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