Home > Free Essays > Law > Criminology > The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs
Cite this

The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs Essay


This report analyses the philosophy of community-based correctional programs based on Larry Greene’s profile. Community corrections aim at protecting the community by making sure that offenders are supervised according to state statutes. Non-compliance on the side of the offender is usually reported to the releasing/sentencing authority. Different states have their special conditions for supervision. The sentencing authority dictates these circumstances. They include restitution of the victim, substance abuse programs, mental health issues, etc. (Alarid, 2016).

Offenders are usually monitored through well-positioned field contacts at their residential places, employment places, etc. The probation officer conducts investigations and prepares violation reports. The investigations may also be pre-sentence (Hanser, 2012).

Community corrections are established to accomplish a number of goals. First, they ease institutional crowding as well as cost. They also strive to prevent future criminal behavior through constant surveillance, rehabilitation and community re-integration. Finally, the correctional programs address the victims’ needs through restorative justice (Alarid, 2016).

Several aspects of jails and prisons are abundantly clear. These include overcrowding and cost. Building jails and prisons is costly. That is why community-based corrections become better alternatives than prisons. People whose offenses are less risky to the community are allowed to serve outside the jails. Also, prisoners who have served a certain amount of their sentences get early release or parole. Parole allows a prisoner to serve the remaining part of their sentence outside the prison but under community supervision (Hanser, 2012).

Another goal of community correctional programs is restorative justice. The assumption behind restorative justice is that crime harms individuals and society as a whole. A good example is that of property victims whose primary wish is usually getting paid back or having their things restored to their original state. This may not be possible if the offender is imprisoned. Thus, restorative justice emphasizes offender responsibility in repairing the injustice caused to the victims (Siegel, 2013). The community may be involved by mediating between the offender and the victim. This may include face-to-face mediation, impact panels, volunteer mentorship, etc. Here, the offender is never taken out of the community but is expected to complete community service and pay victim restitution. This kind of justice is quite effective with property crimes, especially those committed by juveniles or first-time adult offenders (Alarid, 2016).

The third goal of community corrections programs has to do with addressing the specific problems related to criminal behavior. The problems may have to do with low emotional control, lack of education, or drugs or alcohol addiction. Among other reasons are development incapacitation, mental illness, and parenting failures. In this case, the offender is allowed to attend classes in order to address a particular challenge. Everything is done under strict supervision. The offender is also allowed a wider access to treatment programs which are also better than those offered in jail. Effective rehabilitation is also achieved through the incorporation of cognitive-behavioral techniques. Only those offenders who have a desire to change are picked (Alarid, 2016).

Larry Greene’s Case

Larry Greene can benefit from three types of community corrections. These include day reporting center, correctional boot camp, and post-release supervision. At the day reporting center, the community supervision is intense, and Mr. Greene will significantly benefit. He will be visiting the center three to six days in a week for about five months. He will also have access to treatments as well as attend classes that will go a long way in making him develop a positive attitude towards life. He will also be advised on the right company to keep. Since freedom is curtailed here, Greene will not find enough time to waste with his unmotivated friend. The counseling services offered at the day reporting centers will help Greene have a positive outlook on life.

The correctional boot camp will also be of great benefit to Greene as he is in the right age range. The camp admits offenders who are between 17 and 24 years old (Alarid, 2016). Post-release supervision will help him too. This is because movement is monitored. He will have to seek permission first before he leaves a particular location. Moreover, he will be prohibited from keeping bad company.

All in all, community corrections will be beneficial to Greene in a number of ways. First of all, he will stay at home and bond with his parents who are quite loving and supportive of him. Greene can use the time for further studies as his GPA is good. At 20 years of age, Greene is better off going through the community corrections program as he will not be exposed to unsafe conditions that are in jail. Due to his condition, Greene stands to benefit from a more elaborate counseling offered by community corrections. He needs proper individualized attention so that he may become motivated. We are told he is de-motivated.

Conclusion

In a nutshell, many outcomes will be realized by Greene if he attends the community-based correctional program. He will develop a positive attitude towards life and will keep better company. He will also have the opportunity to strengthen the bond with his parents. This is because he will now appreciate their support and love.

References

Alarid, L., (2016). Community-based corrections. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Hanser, R., (2012). Introduction to corrections. London: SAGE.

Siegel, L., (2013). Criminology: Theories, patterns, and typologies. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth.

This essay on The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Need a custom Essay sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar

301 certified writers online

GET WRITING HELP
Cite This paper

Select a referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2020, September 3). The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-philosophy-of-community-based-correctional-programs/

Work Cited

"The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs." IvyPanda, 3 Sept. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/the-philosophy-of-community-based-correctional-programs/.

1. IvyPanda. "The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs." September 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-philosophy-of-community-based-correctional-programs/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs." September 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-philosophy-of-community-based-correctional-programs/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs." September 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-philosophy-of-community-based-correctional-programs/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'The Philosophy of Community-Based Correctional Programs'. 3 September.

More related papers