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Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles Essay


Information plays a crucial role in the development of human beings, especially in education. It is shared through books and articles in print and non-print materials. Articles are important for academic purposes; however, only scholarly articles contribute effectively to education. This paper critically evaluates articles to determine whether they are scholarly or no-scholarly.

The article on “Business Ethics: A helpful Hybrid in Search of Integrity” authored by Edmund Byre is scholarly. The authority of the author is demonstrated by his credentials: professor in philosophy. The author is an editor of business ethics journals; therefore, the topic of the article is within the area of expertise. The author is affiliated with Indiana University. Therefore he is a scholar (Byre, 2002). The author has consulted other recent sources indicated by the use of endnotes and footnotes. Therefore, the information presented is authenticated and is published by an academic body. Edmund Byre owns other business-related publications. The complexity of the topic of the article qualifies it to be scholarly. He maintains the originality, organization, and objectivity of his work.

The article on “Business The view from the top and bottom; Corporate culture” published by The Economist Magazine is non-scholarly. The author of the article is anonymous as indicated in the article (Anonymous, 2011). Information on the author’s credentials and authority is missing. The absence of footnotes, endnotes, and bibliography makes it non-scholarly. Despite the Proquest review, the information presented is not theoretical. The objectivity of the article is not well articulated, and the arguments are easy to understand. Also, the article is easily edited and aimed at a general audience. Thus it is non-scholarly.

The article was written by Jonathan Dee on “A Toy Maker’s Conscience” is non-scholarly. It has no specific format: without article link, abstract, full text, and conclusion. The article lacks a sober and serious look due to bright and decorated first pages. Also, these pages are designed to attract a broad segment of the population, which can be equated to advertising. Further, the article lacks endnotes, footnotes, and a bibliography page. The article does not present a theoretical analysis of the subject. The author of the article has special qualifications for being a novelist (Dee, 2007). However, his credentials are not given; thus, the article is non-scholarly. The language used is not technical, and generally, a knowledgeable reader can understand. Moreover, the topic of the article is not complex, and the objectivity of the article is not well brought out.

The article on “75 years of lessons learned: chief executive officer values and corporate social responsibility,” authored by Carol-Ann Tetrault Sirsly, is scholarly. The author is affiliated with the John Molson School of business (Tetrault Sirsly, 2009). The article meets the objectivity of the author. The topic is complex, and the language used is technical. The journal is aimed at philosophy students. Also, the journal has a sober and serious look. The originality of the article is maintained, and the data presented is theoretical. The language used is technical. Also, the author has consulted other sources, as shown by citations.

Article on “Corporation communication, ethics, and operational identity: a case study of Benetton” is scholarly. The journal is peer-reviewed. A team writes it of experts in the department of the business. Also, the authors have institutional affiliations (Borgerson et al., 2009). The topic is complex, and the objectives of the study are met. The work is of good quality, and it is presented in a given format. The language used is technical and precise. The article has no elements of advertisement. Moreover, the bibliography page is provided, and the work is authenticated because they have consulted other sources. The information provided is a theoretical analysis of communication and ethics at Benetton.

The article on “Deontological ethics” found on Wikipedia is not scholarly. Information on the author of the article, as well as credentials, is not available. Also, the author’s area of expertise and date of publication is unknown. Also, the author’s affiliation with institutions is not provided. The topic is not complex, and the language used is aimed at a general audience. Also, the absence of footnotes, endnotes, and a particular format qualifies the article to be non-scholarly.

Moreover, the article lacks references and reference pages. Further, anyone is allowed to edit the article regardless of qualifications. The article has been edited numerous times by different persons, as noted on the “view history” tab (“Deontological Ethics”, n.d). Generally, the article is non-scholarly.

The article on “The History of Utilitarianism” is scholarly. Information on the author and citations is provided. Also, information on preview, search, and bibliography is provided. Moreover, the date in which the article was published is indicated. The link to the author’s credentials is provided in the article. Also, information on the article is provided on the left side of the article. The article is written in a particular format that provides a conclusion and bibliography. History on the editing of the article is provided on the “author and citation” tab (Driver, 2009). The web page depicts seriousness and no advertisements found on the page.

References

Anonymous. (2011, September 24). Business: The view from the top, and bottom: Corporate culture. The Economist, 400, 76-77.

Borgerson, J., Schroeder, J., Escudero MAgnusson, M., & Magnusson, F. (2009). Corporation communication, ethics, and operational identity: a case study of Benetton. Business Ethics, 18(3), 209.

Byrne E. (2002). Business ethics: A helpful hybrid in search of integrity. Journal of Business Ethics, 37(2), 121-133.

Dee, J. (2007, December 23). A Toy Maker’s Conscience. The New York Times, 34.

Driver, J. (2009). . In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy online. Web.

Tetrault Sirsly, C.-A. (2009). 75 years of lessons learned: chief executive officer values and corporate social responsibility. Journal of Management History, 15(1), 78.

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IvyPanda. (2020, July 28). Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/business-and-ethics-in-scholarly-articles/

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"Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles." IvyPanda, 28 July 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/business-and-ethics-in-scholarly-articles/.

1. IvyPanda. "Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles." July 28, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/business-and-ethics-in-scholarly-articles/.


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IvyPanda. "Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles." July 28, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/business-and-ethics-in-scholarly-articles/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles." July 28, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/business-and-ethics-in-scholarly-articles/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Business and Ethics in Scholarly Articles'. 28 July.

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