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Community Threat Definition and Security Design Report


There are several methods for identifying a threat. The first approach offers to detect threat based on intelligence or historical data. It means that crime statistics is the foundation of this method. However, if there is a lack of historical data, it is as well recommended to switch to intelligence information, i.e. estimate physical protection system (PPS) in order to conclude whether there are any significant risks. According to the second tool, it is necessary to deploy policy-based threat for determining risks. This one refers to choosing a community- or organization-based threat statement and analyzing historical and intelligence data, as well as PPS, for assuming the risks of similar threats. More than that, there is what is known as creating the lists of potential threats based on specificities of communities or organizations. Finally, it is as well advisable to develop scenarios of adversary attacks, i.e. focusing on adversaries instead of particular threats (Fennnelly, 2012).

At the same time, it is imperative to note that there are different types of threats as well as some high-risk areas. They are inseparable in case of each community. For instance, banks, jewelers, furriers, houses of famous and wealthy citizens, buildings of governmental organizations, corporate and agency headquarters are areas related to high risks of threats. Nevertheless, some individuals as well belong to the risk groups. In this case, the difference is made based on the type of a potential threat. For example, auto thefts, assaults, burglary, robbery, and disoriented persons are the common sources of threat to individuals, especially those living alone. On the other hand, all of the high-risk areas mentioned above are exposed to the risks of such threats as terrorist attacks, diversion, internal thefts, armed attacks, kidnapping, hostage incidents, extremist protesters, etc. (Fennnelly, 2012). Still, in case of the community under consideration, auto thefts, robbery, burglary, assaults, armed attacks, and thefts are primary threats.

Designing a Security Checklist

A security checklist is a starting point for establishing a safe physical protection system and diminishing risks of primary threats. However, it is essential to recognize that they only offer a basis for documenting all constituents of the PPS and are not applicable to determining their effectiveness. Still, designing a security checklist is critical for detecting any significant gaps in the PPS and finding ways to protect critical assets (Fennnelly, 2012).

Table 1. A Community-Based Security Checklist.

Item Satisfactory Unsatisfactory N/A
Physical Layout of the Community: Lighting
Is there enough lighting during the dark time of the day?
Are critical and high-risk areas adequately illuminated?
Are all roads sufficiently illuminated?
Is an auxiliary source of energy available in order to guarantee adequate lighting when necessary?
Are lamps replaced immediately if repair is required?
Physical Layout of the Community: Physical Barriers
Are exterior barriers adequate to protect all high-risks areas?
Are high-risk areas physically separated from the community?
Are isolation zones adequately separated?
Are physical barriers checked on a timely basis to guarantee the community’s safety?
Physical Layout of the Community: Access Points
Are access systems in isolated and high-risks areas adequately developed and implemented?
Are there several levels of access systems in isolated and high-risk areas?
Are access points designed in a way that they could be easily inspected and upgraded in case of necessity?
Alarms
Are high-risk areas provided with an efficient alarm system?
Are alarms installed in isolated areas?
Are alarms installed in isolated areas adequately operating?
Are alarms installed in high-risk and isolated areas repaired immediately in case of necessity?
Are all causes of alarm malfunctions properly documented?
Are all staff members provided with schedules and alarm control assignments?
Close Circuit TV (CCTV)
Is close circuit TV working properly?
Are CCTV malfunctions documented and reported in detail?
Are cameras placed in a way that all high-risk and isolated areas are under constant control?
Is there a separate locked room with limited access for storing CCTV hardware?
Are video monitored areas sufficiently illuminated?
Are all cameras operational?
Are cameras repaired or replaced immediately in case of necessity?
Communication and Information Systems
Are all parts of communication and information system properly operating?
Are communication and information systems checked on a timely basis in order to avoid malfunctions?
Are these systems secure and adequately protected?
Is the IP access control adequately operating?
Are malfunctions properly documented and reported?
Critical Access Points
Are databases of isolated and high-risk areas sufficiently protected?
Are wireless access points checked on a timely basis?
Are wireless access points upgraded as needed?
Availability of Security
Is there an adequate number of security staff to guarantee the community’s safety?
Are security systems adequately working?
Is security staff properly trained and controlled?
Do security organizations and law enforcement agencies cooperate to protect the community?
Availability of Law Enforcement
Are the telephone numbers of law enforcement facilities distributed to community members?
Do both private and public local law enforcement facilities coordinate their activities with national regulations?
Do law enforcement agencies report on all accidents?
Are local law enforcement agencies available for consultations in case of necessity?

Reference

Fennnelly, L. J. (2012). Handbook of loss prevention and crime prevention (5th ed.). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

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IvyPanda. (2020, August 3). Community Threat Definition and Security Design. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/community-threat-definition-and-security-design/

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"Community Threat Definition and Security Design." IvyPanda, 3 Aug. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/community-threat-definition-and-security-design/.

1. IvyPanda. "Community Threat Definition and Security Design." August 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/community-threat-definition-and-security-design/.


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IvyPanda. "Community Threat Definition and Security Design." August 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/community-threat-definition-and-security-design/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Community Threat Definition and Security Design." August 3, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/community-threat-definition-and-security-design/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Community Threat Definition and Security Design'. 3 August.

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