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Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence Essay

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Updated: Nov 25th, 2019

Introduction

Ferrell illuminates that the media or screen aggression is unswervingly related to real violence. This relationship has extensively affected the current generation, who admire 80% of the movie and print content they are inclined to. There has been incidence of aggression and criminal acts as a result of media or screen content. It is noteworthy that some of these events have not been solved to date.

Popularizing of criminal culture and its implications

Ferrell illuminates a variety of concepts pertaining to the popularization of criminal culture as illustrated by the following tenets. First, he highlights the concept of criminal subcultures and their influence on the entire society. They act as magnets consequently attracting persons who had not initially foreseen the circumstances or attractions.

It is noteworthy that criminal subcultures are forged after attitudes and beliefs are shaped by the societal systems (Ferrell, 1998, pp 71). Consider the following example as it pertains to cyber crimes since it brings together people endowed with certain skills and tendencies that ultimately culminate in execution of criminal tendencies.

Media representations of crime are also illuminated by Ferrell since it culminates in the infusion of such tendencies in the society (Ferrell, 1998, pp 71). Ferrell highlights that the media is solely responsible for the formation of definite subcultures that propagate crime in the society. Consider the following example; there are crimes that have occurred as a result of media or screen aggression.

For example, the movie” Natural Born Killers” produced in 1995 and “directed by Oliver Stone”, resulted in two teenagers committing murder. It resulted to the murder of “William savage a Mississippi cotton gin manager and shooting of Byers Ann Patsy in Louisiana who was left paralyzed from the neck down” (Boyle, 2005, pp, 29). Two teenagers admitted to these crimes, Sarah Edmondson and her boyfriend. They testified to have gotten motivation from the movie “natural born killers that was under the steward of Oliver Stone.

This means that the implications of media representation of crime are seen in the increased focus on societal processes. Ferrell also illuminates concepts pertaining to criminalized characteristics of music as illustrated by its cult like following that aims at spreading its ideologies especially to people who are unaware. The implications are evident in change of lifestyles especially among the unsuspecting youth and other young persons.

Interests served

According to Ferrell, the interests served range from the producers or rather persons initiating the process “popularization of criminal culture” (Ferrell, 1998, pp 72). It is noteworthy that market leaders in the TV and music industry together with the movie industry focus on coming up with definite cultures that will not only propagate sales but also develop a following.

Entities that have failed in regulations also have vested interests in the popularization process, which have to be addressed in the long run. It is noteworthy that Ferrell insinuates that popularization of such a culture involves persons with diverse interests.

Conclusion

Controversies surrounding productions such as music culminate in higher sales. On the contrary, consumers suffer the consequences. It is the victims of these violence and crimes that suffer the most. The best method to curb such productions, which might pollute the minds of consumers, is to administer regulation to such products. These products include computer games, video and Internet.

List of References

Boyle, K. 2005, Media and violence: gendering the debates. California. SAGE Publication Inc, pp, 29-35.

Ferrell, J. 1998, ‘Criminalizing Popular Culture’, in F. Bailey & D. Hale, Popular Culture, Crime and Justice, Belmont, CA: West/Wadsworth, 1998 71-86.

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"Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence." IvyPanda, 25 Nov. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/criminology-screen-violence-vs-real-violence/.

1. IvyPanda. "Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence." November 25, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/criminology-screen-violence-vs-real-violence/.


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IvyPanda. "Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence." November 25, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/criminology-screen-violence-vs-real-violence/.

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IvyPanda. 2019. "Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence." November 25, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/criminology-screen-violence-vs-real-violence/.

References

IvyPanda. (2019) 'Criminology: Screen Violence vs. Real Violence'. 25 November.

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