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Do Men and Women Have Different Goals for Ministry? Report

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Updated: Dec 10th, 2021

This paper is intended to contemplate and analyze two types of goals between men and women in ministry. The research is based on primary data election supported by literature review. These types of research are usually used to collect the necessary and variegated information on the topic of a study and allow for a better understanding of the situation under discussion and proper conclusions to be made in its end. It is understandable that the researcher is supposed to appear unbiased when commenting and analyzing the data otherwise the research results will appear invalid or inaccurate. As well, it is important to consider the secondary sources as well – for them to be serious books, articles or papers (they can be found both in libraries and on the Internet in the web-document form) but their validity and quality are the necessary and required characteristic. In order to offer examples of both of the research types, the example of the research will be simulated in this paper.

The main goal of this paper is to contemplate the issue of gender differences in religious education connected with and resulting from organizational communication at different levels at companies. The examination of specific scholarly works will allow a deeper understanding of the problem and at least theoretical backgrounds for its possible solutions. It is fair to admit that this question is a very serious one and statistics state that nowadays more and more people suffer at their workplace. They may tend to strive for showing their worth and setting at stake their time and life. So, it is evident that different goals in ministry are a serious issue for many seminaries– almost for all of them. And insofar as personal goals are the topic for discussion, it is necessary to define them. It is characterized by lack of motivation and emotional exhaustion. Previously scholars tended to believe that low motivation is the condition from which only suffer those clergy who work with people. But lately it has been proved that any employee working in any field may become the victim of this stressful condition. It is understandable that any job may become stressful at some point, and it is known that work may make people happy if they enjoy it, and otherwise may make them ill if they are not satisfied with something at their workplace.

Self-administered questionnaires were used for data collection. As for the primary research, as it has been mentioned above, it lies in conducting surveys (interviews or questionnaires) which are expected to offer the researcher an insider perspective of the situation under the study. For instance, and depending on the goal of the surveys, the researcher interviewed the participants of the acquisition in order to understand the core of the issue. “The questionnaire’s length (it was 12 pages long, and required at least half an hour to fill out — often longer) was given as the major reason for nonresponse, since students were in the middle of a semester and had little extra time” (Finlay 1995, p. 94).

The research finds that men have strong personal beliefs while women enter ministry motivated by values and religious principles. The price of freedom should not be self-exclusion from perhaps the most important institution in our nation, the public school. The use of toleration by advocates in the schools to justify public school-sponsored religious activities is prostitution of what organizations like the National Conference of Christians and Jews seek to foster.

Suggesting that choice removes coercion is folly. If the school plans and directs religious observance or activity in any way, it remains an establishment of religion no matter how many choices are offered. That is why the Weisman decision was so critically important. The very fact that a challenge to the school’s prayer policy at graduation could generate such passion and bitter hatred in the community is proof that the issue is religious to the core. Every sentiment expressed by those who attacked the Harris family reflected the belief that somehow the majority was being denied religious worship by the lawsuit. That in itself is proof of the fact that the graduation prayer is a religious ritual so precious to some that it will threaten mayhem to those who see such public school rituals as government-directed religious services. The researcher claims that “The test of the hypothesis involves a comparison of men’s and women’s rating of various types of ministerial positions that have the characteristics of interest (low status versus high-status clientele, for example)” (Finlay, 1995, p. 54).

All of this is to suggest that dogmatic religious assumptions often color perceptions and actions. It is enough that during the Christian holy season of Christmas, every facet of public life is focused on symbols and sounds unique to that faith. It is not tolerable be asking too much to implore Christians to recognize that a respite is surely due to fellow citizens of other faiths in the schools which they help finance and which their children are required to attend. The price of freedom should not be self-exclusion from perhaps the most important institution in our nation, the public school. The use of toleration by advocates in the schools to justify public-sponsored religious activities is prostitution of what organizations like the National Conference of Christians and Jews seek to foster. The latter’s use of the term toleration is predicated upon the very fact that the government cannot enter into such a bargain with religion. In sum, primary data collection and analysis of the secondary literature allow researchers to construct the case study and test the hypothesis.

References

Finlay, B. (1995). Do Men and Women Have Different Goals for Ministry? Evidence from Seminarians, Sociology of Religion, 57 (1), 54.

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IvyPanda. "Do Men and Women Have Different Goals for Ministry?" December 10, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/do-men-and-women-have-different-goals-for-ministry/.

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IvyPanda. 2021. "Do Men and Women Have Different Goals for Ministry?" December 10, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/do-men-and-women-have-different-goals-for-ministry/.

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IvyPanda. (2021) 'Do Men and Women Have Different Goals for Ministry'. 10 December.

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