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Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns Essay


Mobile phone is critical in human communication due to its affordability, reliability, and connectivity. As the world steadily becomes a global village, communication experts have embraced mobile phone communication in providing communication solutions and enhancing interaction between socializing agents.

The prime principle is featured by interconnected holistic phenomenon. The conscientious citizenship need to perceive the global interrelationship with inclusive model of integration through phone culture. Therefore, the problem statement is which factors directly affect the mobile culture in relational maintenance and behavioral patterns in human communication environment?

This reflective treatise attempts to explicitly applaud on the modes and behavioral patterns observed across the gender divide and how the same can be related to mobile culture among socializing agents. These agents are drawn from different cultural divides, gender, age, and exposure.

In order to comprehensively understand and interpreter the research question, the treatise reviews two previous literature on the topic by examining the article “IMing, Text Messaging, and Adolescent Social Networks” by Bryant, Sanders-Jackson, and Smallwood and the book, “Doing Cultural Studies” by Gay et al.

Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns

The global mobile culture integration and its changing patterns has led to immense transformation of the world into a global village comprising of the current interdependent and networked of “global order”1.

Though the world is marked by differences and identities that show how various endeavors of people, groups and communities affirmed their identities, the manifold layers of mobile culture concerning religion, gender, nationalism, class, ethnicity, and personal interests continues to define this century old means of encoding and decoding information.

Literature Review

The world is manifested with emergence of mass society in terms of social interaction, that is, mass culture, mass welfare, mass consumerism, mass communication, and numerical sense of unique population increase. Mobile culture is a shared means of interaction involving people who understand the various symbols of communication through use of mobile phones.

In order to understand the current research on this multi faceted topic, experimental study design is the best method to adopt since it inquires to establish whether an intervention had the proposed reasoned-impact on planned participants or not2.

The aim of a culture is to build social work strategy and practical matters, provide rapid support to social problems, sustain social programs to offer relevant resolutions to social crises in communities, hold up growth through promotion of education to tackle crucial life matters, and advance suitable relevance of new technology for performance of social work.

Mobile phone communication industry is one of the fastest developing service industries in the entire world. Technological growth has enabled customers multiple access of information and entertainment services, and therefore has enhanced establishment of an intrinsic mobile culture.

The article, “IMing, Text Messaging, and Adolescent Social Networks” by Bryant, Sanders-Jackson, and Smallwood dwell much on determinants of behavioral patterns in human communication.

Through embracing maintenance strategy topology, the study identifies the aspects of self disclosure, positivity, and social networking as the assuring factors that promoted effectiveness of mobile cultural modes used across the generational divide3. However, they fail to quantify the aspects of period of influence.

Mobile Culture and Global Behavioral Patterns

The global world is built with many diverse flows, that is, organizational interaction flow, capital flow, symbols, image and sound flow, technological flow and information flow. With an increasing global community, such flows are portrayed as extraordinary development in velocity, volume, and direction4.

For instance, media flow has become diverse global audience that is a unique way of expressing information. Emergence of mobile phones offered an immediate solution for the need to maintain this velocity, volume, and direction. The global media is a multifaceted topography of multi-media, multi-vocal and multi directional flows.

The propagation of satellites created by digital technology and the rising online communication have caused media firms to function in an enhanced transnational arena other than national dome; hence seeking and generating new customers globally. Establishment of mobile phones communication was a solution to this.

However, the focus rarely matters in relation of media markets because producers perceive audience as primarily global consumers rather than local citizens. This change of nation-centric perception into international markets led to establishment of symbolic interaction among citizens who owned mobile phones.

Mobile culture has generated professional occupations in the cultural and information industries5. The outsourcing of information for International Corporations has contributed to the momentum for establishment of significant global focus for creative industries. The operators of global media channels possess strong local presence through focus to get audience beyond their original local constituency.

As a result, this is a subaltern flow of domestic ideas across the entire world has created an evolving geo-cultural and international networks facilitating the contra-flows of shared, internalized, and unique means of phone communication.

Phone culture is important aspect in conserving cultural democracy; therefore the main aim of a nation is to provide broad alternative services to customers through enhanced privatization and liberalization.

The international communication interaction has created diverse disjuncture that is beyond homogenized culture; it has also contributed to cultural ‘hybridity’ that is generated through the use of heterogonous media products to benefit domestic principles, languages and styles. For instance, mobile culture has exercised indirect domination over developing nations; politics and public perception of these nations.

However, it has destabilized cultural sovereignty in many nations such as Syria, Egypt, and Libya which have become states of anarchy. Before penetration of the mobile culture into the society, regionalization trend was perceptible in the development of domestic editions of magazines and newspapers, broadcast of television programs in domestic languages, and also in establishing local programming and domestic language websites6.

In the last 20 years, mobile culture seems to have taken control of formal and informal communication. As a result, interaction with global cultures have provided diverse impacts since people need to filter and evaluate content products from heterogonous cultures to incorporate them with ideas that originate from domestic cultures when communicating7.

Mobile Culture Integration and Its Changing Patterns

Due to global interrelatedness, mobile phones opened the world and provided important features of globalization. However, global integration happened gradually for many centuries. Human evolving pattern involved various regional systems which promoted interaction. Reflectively, within the last century, mobile communication has replaced the traditional means of encoding and decoding messages.

As a result, the whole process has become reliable and convenient. Apparently, mobile phone technology can be classified as the best miracle of the 21st century. By a click of a button, a Chinese student in Miami can communicate with parents back in Beijing.

The diversity of media information only exists in the wider fresh liberal ideological agenda. Apparently, ideology of regionalization develops globalised perception which focuses on liberal democracy and market primacy.

The mobile culture has emphasized on propagation of multilingual contents stemming from local creative hub. Adoption of deregulated, privatized and digital technology transmission network has contributed to enhanced flow of global media.

Human population who lived in the twentieth century caused increase in mass community that was contributed by people’s interaction and movements for economic sustainability. All these implications were closely integrated that led to the rise of mass community.

This immense transformation was an essential focus in the current society. Politics, youth culture, media, leisure and welfare are five distinctive features that are manifested in the modern phone culture society8.

Actually, mass society weakened traditional societal values; industrial revolution weakened aristocratic and traditional values. Mass phone culture is a society that has social, large scale and impersonal institutions.

Identity and Difference

Gradually human communities have become varied with great differences in beliefs, artifacts and languages of communication within the phone culture. Human cultures were comprehended based on symbols of various devices that people created. Such cultural icons lack boundaries and are marked with continues influx that compete and interact in each other9.

For instance, messaging culture has created a ‘quarty’ culture among the youths across the globe. Special codes such as ‘LOL’ and ‘OMG’ have been internalized in the messaging culture and have universal meaning from America to Europe. In fact, messaging culture has transformed people who lived in remote areas; human interaction transforms people who are perceived as barbarians and uncivilized10.

There are many theories that justify possible pull factors of phone culture. Basically, these theories share sentiment on the fact that messaging culture has developed over a long period of interaction among people who share same thought patterns.

Time is therefore an independent variable which fluctuates according to the period of interaction and share values of communicating people11. Messaging culture is actually influenced by dependent and independent variables in human activities.

Findings

The themes of mobile culture have brought ultimate query to prime of all historical world, particularly to the current globalization of mobile culture. Human interaction and sense of shared values has elevated visions of human society. Technological development particularly digitalization has discouraged governments from limiting imports of foreign media contents into local markets.

Due to rising global interaction, the need of internationalization, and easy communication accessibility, many nations are changing their regulatory policies, and therefore promoting their markets for global interaction which is responsible for the established mobile culture.

The variety of cultural attributes embodied in messaging makes them a powerful medium through which to transmit cultural values and morals. Arguably, the world is experiencing a strong trend toward cultural globalization, and no one nation is immune from the influences of the cultures of other nations because mobile culture, in many respects, defies national boundaries.

However, different cultures must be preserved and allowed to flourish, for it is a diversified global culture that benefits the world’s collective well being. Cultural diversification allows people to observe different views and attitudes, test their own biases, and learn from different experiences.

Unrestricted homogenization of cultures should be avoided, and diversification of culture should be championed. Mobile culture that promotes National culture and local cultures should thus be protected by discriminating explicit and immoral communication.

Conclusion

From the literature review as indicated by the articles, the main factors that are associated with changed behavior due to mobile culture of communication are the aspects of social activeness, age, gender, purpose and relationship between the subjects communicating.

Notably, it is apparent that cordial relationships would prefer assurance in use of mobile phones modes than casual acquaintances. Among the younger generation, that is adolescent and teenagers, use of mobile phones is highly influenced by confidence and social activeness.

Therefore, in studying mobile culture, it is critical to factor in behavioral patterns noted in the above studies to create practical and reliable communication designs for reaching different gender, age, culture, and exposure.

Bibliography

Appadurai, Arjun. “Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy.” Public Culture 7, no. 2 (1990): 1-24.

Bly, Van der. “Globalization and the Rise of One Heterogeneous World Culture: A Micro Perspective of a Global Village.” International Journal of Comparative Sociology, no. 48 (2007): 469.

Gay, P., Hall, S., Janes, L., Mackay, H., and Negus Keith. Doing Cultural Studies: The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sage, 1997

Gerard, Goggin. Introduction: what do you mean‘cell phone culture’? in Cell Phone Culture. London and New York: Routledge, 2006

Jackson, A., Bryant, A., & Smallwood, Anthony. “IMing, Text Messaging, and Adolescent Social Networks,” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, no. 11(2006): 577–592.

Mcchesney, Robert. New Global Media: The Global Transformations Reader: An Introduction to the Globalization Debate. Edited by Held Day. Cambridge: Polity, 2004.

Sweetman, Paul, and Knowles Caroline. Picturing the Social Landscape: Visual Methods in the Sociological Imagination. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Footnotes

1 Appadurai, Arjun. “Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy.” Public Culture 7, no. 2 (1990): 1-24.

2 Bly, Van der. “Globalization and the Rise of One Heterogeneous World Culture: A Micro Perspective of a Global Village.” International Journal of Comparative Sociology, no. 48 (2007): 469.

3 Jackson, A., Bryant, A., & Smallwood, Anthony. “IMing, Text Messaging, and Adolescent Social Networks,” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, no. 11(2006): 577–592.

4 Gay, P., Hall, S., Janes, L., Mackay, H., and Negus Keith. Doing Cultural Studies: The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sage, 1997

5 Gay, P., Hall, S., Janes, L., Mackay, H., and Negus Keith. Doing Cultural Studies: The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sage, 1997

6 Gay, P., Hall, S., Janes, L., Mackay, H., and Negus Keith. Doing Cultural Studies: The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sage, 1997

7 Gerard, Goggin. Introduction: what do you mean‘cell phone culture’? in Cell Phone Culture. London and New York: Routledge, 2006

8 Gerard, Goggin. Introduction: what do you mean‘cell phone culture’? in Cell Phone Culture. London and New York: Routledge, 2006

9 Mcchesney, Robert. New Global Media: The Global Transformations Reader: An Introduction to the Globalization Debate. Edited by Held Day. Cambridge: Polity, 2004.

10 Sweetman, Paul, and Knowles Caroline. Picturing the Social Landscape: Visual Methods in the Sociological Imagination. New York: Routledge, 2004.

11 Gerard, Goggin. Introduction: what do you mean‘cell phone culture’? in Cell Phone Culture. London and New York: Routledge, 2006

This Essay on Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns was written and submitted by user Taryn Singleton to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Taryn Singleton studied at the University of Iowa, USA, with average GPA 3.32 out of 4.0.

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Singleton, T. (2019, April 12). Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/effects-of-mobile-culture-in-relational-maintenance-and-behavioral-patterns/

Work Cited

Singleton, Taryn. "Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns." IvyPanda, 12 Apr. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/effects-of-mobile-culture-in-relational-maintenance-and-behavioral-patterns/.

1. Taryn Singleton. "Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns." IvyPanda (blog), April 12, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/effects-of-mobile-culture-in-relational-maintenance-and-behavioral-patterns/.


Bibliography


Singleton, Taryn. "Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns." IvyPanda (blog), April 12, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/effects-of-mobile-culture-in-relational-maintenance-and-behavioral-patterns/.

References

Singleton, Taryn. 2019. "Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns." IvyPanda (blog), April 12, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/effects-of-mobile-culture-in-relational-maintenance-and-behavioral-patterns/.

References

Singleton, T. (2019) 'Effects of Mobile Culture in Relational Maintenance and Behavioral Patterns'. IvyPanda, 12 April.

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