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Marcus Furius Camillus in the History of Rome Essay

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Updated: Feb 12th, 2021

What does Camillus promise to Queen Juno of Veii?

The promise Camillus made to Queen was a tenth of the spoils from the City of Veii and, at the same time, beseeched her to follow them in victory to the city they will share since she will be accorded a temple worth her greatness (Livy 286).

In his triumph, why was Camillus thought to have displayed irreverent behavior?

Camillus was thought to have displayed an irreverent behavior when he considered himself the most conspicuous object amidst victory celebrations. He drove into the City on a chariot drawn by white horses, an act which surprised men who considered it undemocratic and irreverent. This is since the men were trouble at the thought that in respect to his steeds he was made equal to Jupiter and the sun-god making the triumph more brilliant than popular (Livy 288).

How did Camillus propose to conquer the Faliscans when the children of the Faliscans were handed over as hostages?

Camillus proposed to conquer the Faliscans the same way he conquered Veii in the Roman way by dint of courage, toil, and arms. The traitor who had presented the children was stripped, his hands bound behind his back, and given up to the boys to lead him back to Falerii while scourging him with rods (Livy 291).

Why was Camillus indicted and sent into exile?

Camillus was indicted and sent to exile since against Roman traditions he conquered his enemies by use of justice and fair-dealing. He decided to set fair-dealing in the war against Faliscans and commanded them to pay the soldiers hence exempting Roman citizens from war tax that year. This made the senators ill-at-ease with him and decided to free him without delay, the obligations of his vow (Livy 292).

What prevented the Gauls from reaching and taking the Capitoline Hill in Rome?

The hill was surrounded by a crowd consisting of plebeians, too large for the small hill to accommodate or support. Also, the Capitoline Hill was considered the dwelling place of gods and men of Rome. Multitude ran out of the city in confusion towards different directions. Such reactions cooled Guals’ lust for combat, at no point in the battle had they been pushed to such desperate exertions as to abandon assault move towards the City. At the same time, the best soldiers were stationed at strategic points where they frustrated the enemy’s efforts to climb up. The higher they mounted up the steep the easier it was for Romans to drive them down by launching attacks from higher ground (Livy 300-301).

When he arrived in Rome, how did Camillus tell his soldiers they would win their country back?

Camillus advised his soldiers to take advantage of the Gaul’s carelessness after capturing the city. Camillus advised his soldiers to throw their packs in a heap, prepare their weapons and win back their country through iron rather than gold. He exhorted them to fight for their wives, children, native land, and religion. He helped them draw the line on the naturally uneven surface of the ruined city and ensured that their position to attack was clear by the art of war regulations (Livy305).

Why did Camillus give for not abandoning Rome after its destruction by the Gauls?

While languishing in exile, he was more grieved by the nation’s calamity. Camillus found himself pushed by divine inspiration and gave reasons as to why he could still fight for Rome. First, he remembered the goodness and kindness of his fellow citizens, then the circumstances and their common peril as he stated, obliged him together with other men to contribute towards reinforcing the general defense of the City. He felt compassion based on the fact that the Romans only needed him in times of war which made him and the city stand secure during his reign as King. Camillus reminded the people of Ardea of the benefits they received from his reign and urged them to seize such opportunity of requiting the Roman people for such previous benefits (Livy302). He was moved by the fact that despite being exiled, his countrymen should abide in their own homes. Camillus was determined to restore the Citadel and Capitol for a divine purpose, so that people may no longer neglect the worship of the gods. His urge to restore the sacred rites handed over to them by their forefathers (Livy308). According to him, the City of Rome was the head of the world and the seat of the empire where Vesta’s fires were lit, and at the same time was the custodian of shields sent down from heaven and the residence of all gods (Livy 310).

Works Cited

Livy. The History of Rome: Marcus Furius Camillus, The Sack of Veii and the Gallic Sack of Rome, Book 5. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. Print.

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