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Math Curriculum and Ginsberg’s Motivational Framework Essay

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Updated: Feb 5th, 2021

Introduction

A curriculum describes the steps to be followed in the implementation of the learning and teaching process of a particular subject. Its contents include; teaching methodologies, teaching aids, content breakdown, and time allocation to the different parts of the content. This paper develops a mathematics curriculum for adult learners based on the motivational framework of Ginsberg and Wlodkowski. The motivational frameworks are based on inclusion, attitude development of meaning, and competency (Margery, 2011). In the process of curriculum development, it is important to understand the learning characteristics and abilities of the learner. The adult learners comprise of diverse learning abilities; hence, an adult curriculum should seek to address the diverse nature of the learner (Margery and Wlodkowsk, 2009). The curriculum should also strive to develop the learners’ attitude to the subject, have a meaning to the learner, and develop their competency.

An Adult Education Curriculum for Mathematics

This curriculum is based on the following objectives;

  1. The learner should be able to apply number counting and sense to develop real-life problems
  2. Apply the skills of typical measurement to develop real-life problems
  3. Apply the geometric knowledge to identify and solve real-life problems
Topic The skill Application and learning activity
  1. Counting, reading and writing numbers up to 100
  1. Identify the place of values for integers between 1 and 100
  1. Define and identify the use of basic mathematical symbols; -, +, =
  1. Identify and name different geometric shapes
  1. Standard

measurement

  1. Identify the place value of numbers between 100 and 1,000
  1. Graphs and charts
  1. The students should learn to count and write numbers from one to a hundred. The learner should also be able to compare the numbers in terms of their integral values. The learning activities include; counting practice, identification of numbers in a game in groups, filling in missing numbers in a worksheet prepared by the teacher,
  2. The learner should be able to identify and place an integer in two and three-digit numbers in its correct place value. The learner should be able to state the value of different currency coins. The learner should be able to identify the place of value in numbers as they are loudly read out by the teacher in class.
  3. The learner should define and state the application of the basic mathematical symbols, both manually and using a calculator and a computer. The learner should be able to use the mathematical symbols to carry out basic additions and subtractions on numbers up to two digits. The learner should be able to apply addition and subtraction principles to solve mathematical problems by correctly placing mathematical symbols both in the vertical and horizontal arrangement (Margery and Wlodkowski, 2009). The learning activities shall include; use of a calculator and computers to carry out additions and subtraction; the learner should make a shopping list for different items and add the total cost of shopping. The learner should then subtract the cost of shopping from the amount of pocket money to get the difference.
  4. The learner should identify and name basic plane figures, including; circles, triangles, squares, and rectangles (Margery and Wlodkowski, 2009). The learner should be able to state the differences and similarities between the plane figures. This should be in terms of the number of sides, corners, and shape. The learning activities for this unit should focus on the identification and naming of different plane figures within the surrounding. Symbols such as traffic signs can also be embraced to teach this unit. The symbols, together with their meaning as applied in traffic rules, can help the learner master and understand the importance of the plane figures in real-life situations.
  5. The learner should be able to identify quantities of measurement such as; length, weight, time, capacity, and temperature. The leaner should identify and match the units of measurement used to describe the different quantities already mentioned. The leaner shall also identify the instrument used to measure the different quantities of measurement and how to use them. The learning activities for this unit include; taking a measurement of length using a ruler and writing the correct measurement together with their units. The learner should follow the same procedure under the guidance of the teacher to measure weight, time, capacity, and time using appropriate tools. Teaching aids for the unit should include; spring balance for measuring weight, stopwatch, measuring cylinder, weights, water, and ruler.
  6. The learner should recognize the value of a digit in a number according to its position in a number. The digit in a number is based on a position it occupies in the number. The leaner should be able to round off numbers to the nearest whole numbers and place of values as well as make an estimate. The learner should read and write in a systematic manner, numbers between 100 and 1,000. The learner should identify and differentiate between odd and even numbers between 100 and 1,000. The teaching activities in this unit will include; rounding off numbers provided by the teacher on a worksheet, counting and recording items in an inventory, carrying a test on numbers to find out whether they are odd or even.
  7. The learner in this unit should be able to read and interpret charts and graphs as applied in different mathematical situations. The learner should recognize different types of listing used for numbering, such as; alphabetical listing, numerical listing, and random listing. The learner should be able to use charts such as; pie charts and graphs to present information. The learning activities for this unit should include; use of graphs and pie charts to explain and answer questions on different topics.
    (Wlodkowski, 2008). A learner should be able to extract and interpret information as presented on the charts and graphs. The charts and graphs used should capture information on either gender for purposes of inclusion and creation of meaning.

The tools used in the curriculum to promote the motivational framework of Ginsberg and Wlodkowski

Ginsberg and Wlodkowski’s motivational framework emphasize inclusion, attitude, creation of meaning, and development of competency (Wlodkowski, 2008). In order to achieve inclusion, the curriculum suggests a variety of learning activities that are friendly to both gender and different learning capabilities. Learning activities suggested in the curriculum revolve around reading, writing, calculating, measuring, and recording, all of which can be undertaken by all students with ease. The curriculum puts weight on activities that are relevant to real-life situations to create meaning for the students. By drawing examples from real-life examples, the learner is able to connect the information learned in class with what they physically see outside class (Wlodkowski, 2008). There is also a greater emphasis on hands-on activities to empower the students in terms of competency and development of the right attitude towards the subject.

Reference List

Margery, G. (2011). A Transformative Professional Learning: A System to Transform Teacher and Student Learning. London: Sage Ltd.

Margery, G. and Wlodkowski, R. (2009). Diversity and Motivation: Culturally Responsive Teaching in College. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Wlodkowski, R. (2008). Enhancing Adult Motivation to Learn. A Comprehensive Guide for Teaching all Adults. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

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IvyPanda. (2021, February 5). Math Curriculum and Ginsberg's Motivational Framework. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/math-curriculum-and-ginsbergs-motivational-framework/

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"Math Curriculum and Ginsberg's Motivational Framework." IvyPanda, 5 Feb. 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/math-curriculum-and-ginsbergs-motivational-framework/.

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IvyPanda. 2021. "Math Curriculum and Ginsberg's Motivational Framework." February 5, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/math-curriculum-and-ginsbergs-motivational-framework/.

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IvyPanda. (2021) 'Math Curriculum and Ginsberg's Motivational Framework'. 5 February.

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