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Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis Essay


Introduction

Apart from Keynes, no other economists seem to have gained greatly from the economic slowdown of 2007-2009 as Hyman Minsky. The fall down of the second largest market in 2007 has been unanimously referred to as “Minsky instant,” and majority see the succeeding impact of the monetary model and great financial crisis as attesting Minsky’s economic volatility premise concerning financial disaster in capitalist markets (Ferri & Hyman 1992).

Does minsky’s premise actually justify the crisis?

Appreciation of Minsky’s logical input is welcome and justified. Basically, Minsky was an excellently intuitive economist regarding the tendency of capitalist markets in experiencing economically compelled explosions and developments, and the financial calamity has attested majority of his arguments (Justin 2008). That said, this essay argues that Minsky’s premise simply offers an incomplete and one-sided explanation of the existing financial crisis.

To make the argument, the essay will look into opposite evaluations of the economic calamity by insightful theorists. On one side, Jan Kregel, an economist has contended the financial slow down is completely described by Minsky’s economic volatility premise (Charles 2007).

On the other side is the modern Marxist perspective as explained by Foster and McChesney, the financial system of accumulation (FSA) perspective as explained by Kotz, and the organizational Keynesian perspective (Kotz 2009). These modern perspectives evaluate the economic calamity essentially differently, tracking its definitive causes back to financial growth within the actual market.

The modern Marxist, FSA, and organizational Keynesian perspectives associate the causes of the financial slow down with the implementation of the liberal development framework in 1970s when the “Accord of Detroit” development framework was ditched (Jan 2007).

Many argued that the 1970 neoliberal development strategy depended on increasing liability and asset price increases with a view of bridging the gap in cumulative demand generated by salary inactivation and increased earnings disparity. Minsky’s economic volatility theory illustrates how economies bridged this gap and satisfied it so much than might realistically have been anticipated.

Evaluated from this viewpoint, the system explained in Minsky’s economic volatility theory is fundamental in comprehending the neo-liberal age, but it is part of a wider account. This neo-liberal framework was always not sustainable and thus causing a stop of its own treaty. The function of Minsky’s economic volatility theory is that of explaining why the neo-liberal framework continued advancing much longer than expected.

Instability and regulation

By extending full discretion to the Minsky system of economic novelty, monetary deregulation, regulatory freedom, and enhanced craving for monetary risks, policy architects such as Alan Greenspan increased the existence of the neo-liberal framework.

However, this made the financial calamity greater and more sudden when monetary economy finally achieved its maximum values. Without monetary novelty and monetary deregulations the neo-liberal framework would have remained fixed in stagnation ten years before, but it would have been situation lacking the architects of monetary calamity.

The procedure of monetary novelty and deregulations increased the financial authority and existence of the monetary industry and has been referred to as monetization (Paul 2009). Monetization is the notion that borrows Minsky’s concepts regarding monetary volatility with modern Marxist and organizational Keynesian concepts concerning demand scarcity increasing because of the effect of neo-liberal financial policies on remuneration and earnings disparity.

The explanations offered for the crisis matter greatly for policy guidelines in addressing the financial calamity. If the calamity is an “untainted” Minsky financial calamity, all that would be required would be monetary deregulation focused on positioning assumption and high risk appetite back in order (Foster & McChesney 2009).

The modern Marxist-FSA-organizational-Keynesian “monetarization” interpretations of the calamity are far more not optimistic. Monetary regulations are required for ensuring financial constancy, but they do not tackle the fundamental aspects of the calamity, nor will they reinstate development without unemployment.

In fact, ironically, monetary deregulation could even retard development as simple admission to credit is an important mechanism of the neo-liberal development framework. Removing that mechanism while maintaining the framework guarantees even slower development (Samuel, David & Thomas 1983; David 1996).

Minsky’s monetary volatility theory

Minsky’s monetary volatility premise argues that capitalist monetary mechanisms have a grounded inclination to monetary volatility. The inclination can be summed up in the phrase “successes breed failures” – or better still, “successes breed surplus failures.”

Minsky’s model is one of developmental volatility and it rests on two unlike cyclic procedures (Stiglitz 1990). Firstly, is the elementary Minsky phase and secondly, is the great Minsky phase. The elementary Minsky phase provides an emotionally based hypothesis of the production phase.

An agent becomes gradually less pessimistic, noticeable in gradually optimistic valuation of asset and related income sources and readiness of taking on growing risk believing that the positive income is here eternally. This optimistic emotion upsets both the borrower and the lender and not simply all sides of the economy. That is essential as it implies financial sector becomes increasingly eradicated (Martin 2008).

Explanation of the crisis

Minskyian interpretations of the financial calamity lead to a special focus on monetary economies. Contrary, modern Marxist, FSA, and organizational Keynesian explanations think the crisis has greater causes positioned in the actual market (Benanke 2004, p. 12). Modern Marxist adopts Baran-Sweezy cartel financial modes of evaluation in explaining the crisis, contending the financial calamity symbolizes an arrival of the developmental trend of reluctance within capitalist markets (Sweezy 1978; Palley 2008).

Kortz embraces FSA methods of evaluation that have strong ties with modern Marxist concept. For both, the financial disaster symbolizes an arrival of the oppositions within the neo-liberal age of development and income collection triggered by 30 years of salary inactivation and broadening earning disparity. Finances are evidently available in the crisis as the increment of income played an important function maintaining demand increment and opposing stagnation trend within the neo-liberal framework (Palley 1997; Palley 1998).

The organizational Keynesian description generated by palley has numerous similar characteristics to the modern Marxist and FSA concepts, especially concerning the importance of shifting to neo-liberalism in the 1970s. The Keynesian approach is the open aim at cumulative demand, which is the basis through which the organizational amendments linked to neo-liberalism impact the market (Yellen 2009).

Conclusion

In conclusion, the modern Marxist and FSA interpretations, finances play an important function in the organizational Keynesian interpretation through keeping demand by liability and higher price of assets instead of salary increase. But, there exist two extra aspects of the organizational Keynesian premise.

Firstly, is its contribution to and focus on the structural importance of monetary novelty and deregulations to fuel demand development. This offers the avenue to integrate Minsky’s monetary volatility theory into a wider unrealistic interpretation of the crisis. Secondly is its contribution to the business shortage and the imperfect United States framework of international financial adoption to cause the crisis.

References

Benanke, B 2004, ‘The Great Moderation’, Economic Association, 20 February, p. 12

Charles, W 2007, ‘Not (Yet) a Minsky Moment’, VoxEU, 23 November, p. 22, <>.

David, M 1996, Fat and Mean, Free Press, New York.

Ferri, P & Minsky, H 1992, ‘Market Processes and Thwarting Systems’, Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, vol. 3 no. 1, pp. 79-91.

Foster, B & McChesney, W 2009, ‘Monopoly-Finance Capital and the Paradox of Accumulation’, Monthly Review, vol. 61 no. 5, pp. 1-20.

Jan, 2007, The Natural Instability of Financial Markets, <>.

Justin, L 2008, ‘In Time of Tumult, Obscure Economist Gains Currency’, Wall Street Journal, vol. 4 no. 12, pp. 66-78.

Kotz, M 2009, ‘The Financial and Economic Crisis of 2008’, Review of Radical Political Economics, vol. 41 no. 3, pp. 305-17.

Martin, W 2008, ‘The End of Lightly Regulated Finance Has Come Closer’, FT.com, 16 September 16, p. 12.

Palley, T 1997, “The Institutionalization of Deflationary Policy Bias”, in H Hagerman & A Cohen (eds), Advances in Monetary Theory, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, pp. 157-73.

Palley, T 1998, Plenty of Nothing: The Downsizing of the American Dream and the Case for Structural Keynesianism, Princeton University Press, Princeton.

Palley, T 2008, “Financialization: what it is and why it matters”, in E Hein et al. (eds), Finance-Led Capitalism, Metropolis Publishing, Germany, pp. 29-60.

Paul, K 2009, The Night They Read Minsky, <>.

Samuel, B, David, M & Thomas, E 1983, Beyond the Wasteland, Anchor Press, New Jersey.

Stiglitz, J 1990, ‘Symposium on Bubbles’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 4 no. 2, pp. 28-33.

Sweezy, P 1978, ‘Crisis within the crisis’, Monthly Review, vol. 30 no. 7, pp. 32-44.

Yellen, L 2009, “Meeting the Challenges of the Financial Crisis”, in Minsky Meltdown: Lessons for Central Bankers’ Presentation to the 18th Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference on the State of the U.S. and World Economies, New York City, <>.

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IvyPanda. (2019, September 22). Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/minskys-economic-volatility-theory-as-an-evaluation-of-financial-crisis/

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"Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis." IvyPanda, 22 Sept. 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/minskys-economic-volatility-theory-as-an-evaluation-of-financial-crisis/.

1. IvyPanda. "Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis." September 22, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/minskys-economic-volatility-theory-as-an-evaluation-of-financial-crisis/.


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IvyPanda. "Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis." September 22, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/minskys-economic-volatility-theory-as-an-evaluation-of-financial-crisis/.

References

IvyPanda. 2019. "Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis." September 22, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/minskys-economic-volatility-theory-as-an-evaluation-of-financial-crisis/.

References

IvyPanda. (2019) 'Minsky’s Economic volatility theory as an evaluation of Financial Crisis'. 22 September.

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