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Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools Essay


Introduction

There are three main monetary barriers that are seen to inhibit the implementation of music programs in schools. The most highly cited being that the heads of education lack confidence in the subject. The second problem is the negative perception, stemming from the view that teaching music is irrelevant, thus will be a waste of money. The third and most widely blamed issue is the lack of room in the curriculum to integrate such a program.

Heads of education are finding it increasingly difficult to equally finance music programs the way they create monetary provisions to other ‘more important’ subjects like science or physical education. This paper discusses these problems, demonstrating how solutions can be found for successful implementation of music programs. It is evident that music programs are fundamentally important, socially and academically. However, the monetary barrier is the main concern of how to achieve. The three monetary problems presented in this paper can be viewed as barriers to the implementation of effective and quality music programs in our education system. It is through the identification of these problems that solutions can begin to be formed.

Lack of Confidence in Music

Objection

Teachers are more effective when it comes to teaching concepts that they confidently understand, thus when it comes to that which they do not fully comprehend, the monetary issues are bound to arise, since no one wants to invest in that which they do not understand and have no confidence in.

Counter objection

If teachers and the heads of education were confident in music as a subject, then there would be no monetary constraints, since there would be confidence and positivity towards music as a subject, thus sufficient budgetary allocations will be directed towards music programs.

Relevance and importance of music programs

Objection

There is a belief that music is not an essential part of the curriculum and detracts time away from more-important subjects like those pertaining to numeracy and science, thus monetary resources are not being directed towards such programs. However, it has also been recognized that the utmost inadequacies when it comes to teaching lie in primary music education, and that many of the problems in our education programs could be eliminated by enriching music programs. When these music programs are enriched, then the teaching of music in schools will be greatly enhanced, hence promoting music in general.

Counter objection

By knowledge of this, the necessary monetary requirements should be directed towards realization of music programs, because the creative arts give the learners a range of attitudes and skills which cannot be developed in any other subject. Student’s confidence in their own abilities and understandings must first be increased in order to be more understood, for there to be a monetary contribution.

Insufficient government input

Objection

There is also the pressure in the part of the government in financing different sectors of education, although this should not be the reason for their laxity when it comes to financing music programs.

Counter objection

Community fundraising efforts could make up for some of the lack of sufficient money in running a good music program, even though it will only make up a portion of it. However, fundraising efforts also run the risk of overtaxing the community, which is already experiencing fatigue from the widespread solicitations accompanying these tough economic times.

Conclusion

What most people don’t yet realize is that money can actually be saved by making in-school music programs stronger, and that in the long run, it costs more to make cuts to these programs. A music program should be at the heart of nearly every school board discussion, and it is important to advocate for monetary input when it comes to music programs since we are in tight economic times.

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IvyPanda. (2020, August 18). Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/music-programs-and-monetary-barriers-in-schools/

Work Cited

"Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools." IvyPanda, 18 Aug. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/music-programs-and-monetary-barriers-in-schools/.

1. IvyPanda. "Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools." August 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/music-programs-and-monetary-barriers-in-schools/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools." August 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/music-programs-and-monetary-barriers-in-schools/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools." August 18, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/music-programs-and-monetary-barriers-in-schools/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Music Programs and Monetary Barriers in Schools'. 18 August.

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