Home > Free Essays > Business > Case Study > Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company
Cite this

Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company Essay


Sexual harassment policy for the company that would address harassment issues for all employees

Sexual harassment refers to any advances, requests, communication, contact, or any other form of gesture with another person in a manner which causes discomfort to the person (Barbara, 2007, pp. 213-234). The surest way of addressing sexual harassment, which commonly occurs in many organizations, is by preventing it. The task of preventing sexual harassment lies squarely on the employer. The employer must develop anti-harassment rules which must be applied to all employees (Quick & Nelson, 2013). The policy on sexual harassment should be monitored and reviewed periodically. Sexual harassment incidences must be promptly investigated, and employees who feel harassed be supported. Disciplinary measures must be taken on employees found to be sexually harassing others.

Should men and women have equal treatment in sexual harassment issues?

Men and women should be treated equally in sexual harassment issues. For long, women have been marginalized and have relied on affirmative action to promote their interests in this male-dominated world (Murphy & Graff, 2005). However, the workplace environment has today changed. There is stiff competition, and both men and women are aggressively seeking better opportunities. Professionals in HR and gender matters believe that female employees should not liken this aggression to sexual harassment. It is a pure competition where the fittest survive in the quest for lucrative positions and power (Knights & Willmott, 2012). Similar standards should, therefore, be applied when handling issues of sexual harassment regardless of whether the complaint has been raised by a male or female employee (Agars, 2004, pp. 103-111).

Ways businesses should balance the need for increased productivity with the needs and concerns of the employees

Successful businesses are those that can create a balance between productivity improvement and flexible work-life for employees (Armstrong & Baron, 2002). This arrangement benefits both the employer and the employee. The business should be able to harness maximum employee productivity without the employee feeling stressed and overwhelmed. The business must seek to be an employer of choice who provides financial rewards and work-life balance policies (Stewart & Brown, 2012). A good employer gives employees clear and realistic objectives, with realistic timelines and expected results (Clegg et al., 2011). Employees should be given periodic breaks and should have consistent expectations.

The employees should be encouraged and praised when they deserve it. Appreciating employees for a job well done will go a long way in communicating that they are valued for their contribution (Stewart & Brown, 2012). Any employee who makes a mistake should not be punished but should be taught the right ways of accomplishing the task. The business should create an enabling working environment that promotes maximum employee productivity. The employees should have material and financial support alongside the right equipment, materials, aeration, and lighting as well as protective clothing (Clegg et al., 2011).

References

Agars, D. M. (2004). Reconsidering the impact of gender stereotypes on the advancement of women in organizations. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 28(2), 103-111. Web.

Armstrong, M., & Baron, A. (2002). Strategic HRM: The route to improved business performance. London: Charted Institute of Personnel and Development.

Barbara, R. B. (2007). Discrimination through the economist’s eye. In F. J. Crosby, M. S. Stockdale, & S. A. Ropp (Eds.), Sex discrimination in the workplace (pp. 213-234). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Clegg, S., Kornberger, M., & Pitsis, T. (2011). Managing and organisations: An introduction to theory and practice (3rd ed.). London: Sage.

Knights, D., & Willmott, H. (2012). Introducing organisational behaviour and management (2nd ed.). London: Thompson Learning.

Murphy, E., & Graff, E. J. (2005). Getting even: Why women don’t get paid like men-and what to do about it. New York: Touchstone.

Quick, J. C., & Nelson, D. L. (2013). Principals of organisational behaviour: Realities and challenges (8th ed.). South Western: Cengage Learning.

Stewart, G. L., & Brown, K. G. (2012). Human resource management (2nd ed.).Danvers, MA: John Wiley & Sons.

This essay on Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Need a custom Essay sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar
Writer online avatar

301 certified writers online

GET WRITING HELP
Cite This paper

Select a referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2020, July 29). Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/sexual-harassment-policy-for-the-company/

Work Cited

"Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company." IvyPanda, 29 July 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/sexual-harassment-policy-for-the-company/.

1. IvyPanda. "Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company." July 29, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/sexual-harassment-policy-for-the-company/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company." July 29, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/sexual-harassment-policy-for-the-company/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company." July 29, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/sexual-harassment-policy-for-the-company/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Sexual Harassment Policy for the Company'. 29 July.

More related papers