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Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India Research Paper


The video “Indoor air pollution: The silent killer” discusses the detrimental impact of indoor air pollution in rural Indian households on people’s health (NDTV, 2015). The data presented in the video file reveals horrifying facts about the participation of household pollution in global pollution rates. According to NDTV (2015), household air pollution is accountable for as much as 12% of all air pollution. In rural India, where people cook on old-fashioned stoves that produce a great amount of carbon emission, household air pollution has reached a dramatically high point. 87% of rural households and 26% of urban ones cook on stoves that use biodegradable but highly polluting fuels such as coal and wood (NDTV, 2015). This material is very low in energy efficiency and high pollution level. According to data provided by the School of public health at the University of California, Berkley, the PM 10 level in rural households in India is 13 times higher than the national air quality standards allow (NDTV, 2015).

What is even more dangerous is that household air pollution is accountable for 21% of global black carbon emissions. There are several reasons why people do not use modern stoves. First of all, the majority of people cannot afford them. Another reason is the unavailability of mechanics in case of an emergency. Thirdly, most people still do not know how to use modernizes versions of stoves and, as a result, they continue using the old ones (NDTV, 2015). However, some people switch to solar cookers. They say that whereas these cookers are expensive, their price is compensated by benefits. A solar cooker allows cooking indoors when the weather is bad, and it takes four times less wood. Still, specialists remark that while such stoves reduce air pollution, they do not eliminate dangerous health impacts (NDTV, 2015). In the country where over a million children under the age of five die every year from household pollution, it is crucial to implement some radical changes.

When talking about air pollution, people rarely think of indoor pollution. However, this type of contamination is rather dangerous, and everyone should know about it as well as the ways of eliminating it. Our houses may be impacted by such pollutants as trichloroethylene, xylene, formaldehyde, ammonia, and benzene (“Nasa guide,” 2016). Trichloroethylene is found in paints, adhesives, and inks, and it causes nausea and dizziness. Ammonia is abundant in fertilizers and window cleaners, and it leads to eye irritation and sore throat. Xylene is found in tobacco smoke and rubber items and causes heart problems and irritation to mouth and throat. Formaldehyde’s habitat is paper, and this toxin irritates the nose, throat, and mouth.

Benzene is found in plastic and synthetic fibers, and it leads to drowsiness and headaches (“Nasa guide,” 2016). Keeping certain types of house plants is one of the best ways to eliminate the dangerous impact of pollutants on people’s health is keeping house plants. Such plants as Kimberley Queen fern, spider plant, dwarf date palm, Chinese evergreen, Boston fern, weeping fig, devil’s ivy, broadleaf lady palm, flamingo lily, and lilyturf protect from formaldehyde and xylene. Varigated snake plant, English ivy, peace lily, red-edged dracaena, and florist’s chrysanthemum help to fight almost all of the pollutants (“Nasa guide,” 2015). Apart from keeping house plants, indoor air pollution may be reduced by good ventilation, minimized clutter, and using detectors of carbon monoxide. The problem of indoor air pollution is rather significant, and people should do their best to eliminate it.

References

NASA guide to air-filtering houseplants. (2016). Web.

NDTV. (2015). [Video file]. Web.

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IvyPanda. (2020, October 2). Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/indoor-air-pollution-the-silent-killer-in-rural-india/

Work Cited

"Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India." IvyPanda, 2 Oct. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/indoor-air-pollution-the-silent-killer-in-rural-india/.

1. IvyPanda. "Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India." October 2, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/indoor-air-pollution-the-silent-killer-in-rural-india/.


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IvyPanda. "Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India." October 2, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/indoor-air-pollution-the-silent-killer-in-rural-india/.

References

IvyPanda. 2020. "Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India." October 2, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/indoor-air-pollution-the-silent-killer-in-rural-india/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Indoor Air Pollution: The Silent Killer in Rural India'. 2 October.

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