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Communication Differences between Men and Women Using Body Language Essay

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Updated: Dec 28th, 2018

Communication is distinguished to be either verbal or non-verbal. Men and women are known to communicate for totally different reasons. Therefore, there are significant differences between the body language used by men and women when communicating. This gives the implication that there is a high likelihood of a man misunderstanding a woman’s language in settings and situations, such as social circles, workplace, and during dating.

This is greatly attributed to the fact that one gender’s view is regarded differently by the other gender. In different societies, the body language used by men and women results in a wide array of misunderstandings (Abercrombie 335). Misunderstandings occur as a result of differences in understanding body language used by both genders. Continually, men and women develop body languages that are only significant to them but not to the opposite gender.

Body language also varies depending on behaviour and culture. Identifying body languages between men and women assists in creating mutual understanding. The main goal of communication for men is passing particular information and tackling specific challenges. On the other hand, women usually communicate to express their feelings or satisfy the need for emotional intimacy. It is worth noting that women utilize nonverbal communication more as opposed to men (McWhorter 52).

Women are notorious for their ability to interpret nonverbal signs. In addition, women are experts in identifying unintended nonverbal, signs such as deception signs. Irrespective of the fact that the male gender also communicates using nonverbal signs, their intentions are less subtle compared to those of the females.

In addition, they have a higher tendency of using their hands when expressing themselves. On the contrary, women are more likely to use exceptionally restrained and subtle gestures. Furthermore, women display differential gestures. These include lowering their eyes during confrontation and interruption.

When communicating, women are more notorious for using eye contact as opposed to men. This is attributed to the fact that women often use communication for establishing emotional connection. Women also use eye contact to achieve sincerity in their colleagues. Furthermore, women rely on facial expression to establish the level of their emotions and pass a message across (Abercrombie 335). While women prefer communicating side-by-side with their mates, men are more comfortable with face-to-face communication.

Women possess a higher desire for intimacy, which makes them more comfortable with close body contact as opposed to men. On the contrary, men consider close proximity as an indication of confrontational intent or aggressiveness. It is worth noting that close proximity is tolerated at different degrees depending on the culture. These variations create a clear distinction between the male and female gender.

Often, men think that there is a close association between touching and sexual intentions. As a result, heterosexual men never touch their fellow men during communication. On the other hand, women are more likely to touch fellow women during communication since they associate this with sympathy and friendship.

Women better comprehend nonverbal communication than men. Moreover, women possess perfect skills that enable them to identify inconsistencies between words and body language during communication (McWhorter 45). This gives the indication that women have a high tendency of communicating nonverbally with men. However, men may not comprehend the nonverbal communication. This is because men prefer verbal communication to nonverbal (Abercrombie 335).

Works Cited

Abercrombie, Mella. “Non-verbal communication.”Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine 65.4 (1972): 335. Print.

McWhorter, Kathleen. Successful College Writing. New York: Bedford/St.Martin’s, 2012. Print.

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IvyPanda. (2018) 'Communication Differences between Men and Women Using Body Language'. 28 December.

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