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Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects Essay


Hiring Moral Individuals

The process of hiring adequate individuals is one of the key contributors to the foundation of an ethical working environment. It is evident that any knowledge possessed by any given employee should be accompanied by moral values. Therefore, it is important to look for individuals who showcase high ethical standards and personal integrity. One of the ways to make sure that only ethical employees are hired is to perform behavioral analysis of the person’s resume and analyze the job announcement notification. It can also be vital to check their references and check their background.

The HR manager may also expose the interviewees to several ethical dilemmas and conduct personality surveys. If the future employees are involved in the latter, it can become a critical part of the whole interview process. By doing this, the organization will be able to emphasize the significance of ethics before discussing some of the job aspects that may be characterized as company-specific (Braswell, 2014). All the interviewees should be aligned with the image of a perfect employee so as to create certain organizational expectations (that will be discussed further in the paper).

Before hiring an individual, the organization should make sure that they are careful and behave consciously as these two aspects are the key two predictors of high ethics and employee performance. The HR manager should be able to see if the job candidate is responsible and capable of adhering to the organizational code of ethics. Conscientious individuals are less more likely to deceive other workers and do not take part in conspiracies and trickeries. Cognizant behavior relates to the employee’s ability to help others within the workplace setting and showcase organizational loyalty. It is a well-known fact that such individuals receive higher scores in a variety of reports revolving around the quality of customer service and overall performance quality.

Creating Accountability

When it comes to the area of ethical training and action, there are several ways to create accountability in these organizational segments. The first strategy can be based on having recurrent conversations with employees that do not showcase ethical behavior (Albanese, 2015). This is important because not all stakeholders or employees may understand how and why their behavior impacts other individuals within the organization. The second way to create accountability is to address the issue of low performance as soon as possible (Banks, 2016). Sometimes, it may be critical to come up with a set of written goals instead of promoting oral communication (this is especially true when the manager has to deal with truly bad employees).

Creating Expectations for Moral Conduct

In order to create expectations for moral conduct, the organization has to revise its culture and elaborate new guidelines that will be dwelling on the process of employees interacting with each other and any given stakeholders (Banks, 2016). Also, it may be necessary to outline the basics of behavior that is acceptable in the workplace. This particular set of rules can also be referred to as the code of conduct. All the expectations should be accurately documented and communicated to all workers in both written and oral form.

Ongoing training may take place within the organization so as to emphasize the significance of ethical behavior and keep the employees in the state of awareness (Belshaw & Johnstone, 2015). By means of clear expectations, the organization will be able to enable the employees to engage in the decision-making process and distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. The list of expectations can also become a useful instrument during the process of hiring new employees (meaning that a number of questions can be composed on the basis of the guidelines and used during the interviews).

Measuring Progress toward Moral Criminal Justice Department

One of the ways to measure the morality of any given criminal justice department is to found this measurement on the concept of trust and stringency of the rules in the case of corroding trust. There is also a supposition that an intensification of the organizational strictness may be harmful to trust. The importance of this measurement variable can also be defined by the level of liberal democracy that is enabled in the workplace. For instance, any uncivilized or unstructured community can be described as lacking trust because having a circle of trust is essential for successful teamwork.

Therefore, it can be concluded that the more trust there is within the group of people, the more successful they are. Trusting those individuals who are not part of the group may lead to adverse consequences. Accordingly, there is no possibility to build a democratic community that significantly boosts the progress toward a just and moral criminal justice department. On the other hand, there are also additional aspects that can influence the overall state of affairs within the organization that expects to build an ethical community (Braswell, 2014).

The first variable is the resources that are available to the facility. For instance, if the community is small, it may be reasonable to organize small trusted alliances. By doing this, the organization will be able to promote “local” trust without expanding it outside the alliance. Another aspect that can have a momentous impact on trust within the criminal justice organization is corruption. The key problem with bribery consists in the fact that even though there are evident benefits, the trust will be worn away due to the entrenchment of power among those who run the illicit operations described above within the organization. To conclude, it may be stated that the higher the level of trust is, the more progressive are the ethics of any given organization.

References

Albanese, J. (2015). Professional ethics in criminal justice. London, UK: Pearson Education.

Banks, C. (2016). Criminal justice ethics: Theory and practice (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Belshaw, S., & Johnstone, P. (2015). Ethics in the criminal justice system. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company.

Braswell, M. (2014). Justice, crime, and ethics. Cincinnati, OH: LexisNexis.

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IvyPanda. (2020, September 7). Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-criminal-justice-moral-aspects/

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"Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects." IvyPanda, 7 Sept. 2020, ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-criminal-justice-moral-aspects/.

1. IvyPanda. "Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects." September 7, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-criminal-justice-moral-aspects/.


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IvyPanda. "Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects." September 7, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-criminal-justice-moral-aspects/.

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IvyPanda. 2020. "Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects." September 7, 2020. https://ivypanda.com/essays/ethics-in-criminal-justice-moral-aspects/.

References

IvyPanda. (2020) 'Ethics in Criminal Justice: Moral Aspects'. 7 September.

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