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Food, Music and Verbal Communication in China Coursework

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Updated: May 14th, 2022

Chinese traditional cuisine has been recognized from the viewpoint for its rich history and, therefore, it has gained the world’s reputation due to its sophisticated nature. In particular, traditional Chinese cuisine and foods reflect the richness of Chinese culture, including a range of vegetables, jellyfish and salted fish, tofu-derived products, and rice-related food. The overview of selected products, as well as the techniques of preparing food in China, provides a wider picture of Chinese culture. In particular, Li and Hsieh (2004) assert, “food in China is not consumed merely to satisfy hunger, but for health promotion, treating diseases and, most importantly, building relationships among people and enhancing family values” (p. 147). Thus, the basic Chinese diet consists of such cultivated crops as rice and soybean.

Chinese music has a long history and constitutes an integral part of Chinese culture. It is mostly represented by Cantonese instrumental and operatic music, which dates back to folk melodies and gave rise to modern Chinese opera. According to Huai Sheng (2005), “Cantonese instrumental music has played a key role in the development of traditional Chinese instrumental music at large” (p. 1). Due to the increased cross-cultural communication, Chinese music has rapidly spread to other civilizations, including Western societies. Especially attention requires the second half of the nineteenth century, the time when operatic music has penetrated to Vancouver.

Xu et al. (2009) have detected that the Chinese verbal communication style is premised on the mode preference paradox, which relies on the preference of speakers to obtain information on probabilities of the event in numerical terms but verbally renders this information. Verbal preferences are prevalent in Chinese-speaking communities. The prevalence of the communication preference model occurs among Chinese culture more frequently. Mandarin, Cantonese, and Min are considered primary languages in China. However, these varieties of the Chinese language are often regarded as their dialects (Tsung, 2012). Due to the lack of distinction between languages in terms of understanding of primary and secondary language in China, there is rigid debate within the context of Chinese culture. In addition, Tsung (2012) focuses on the study of major language groups – Yi and Han Chinese – to define that the Yi language and its varieties have been interacting due to the close communication between the two language groups. Such an interaction has led to the creation of a new code-mixing language (Doctoroff, 2011). The analysis of language distinctions has a potent impact on the development of worldviews in China. Specific emphasis should be placed on Confucian paradigms that remain popular in the current society. The sophisticated nature of the Chinese language influences the depth of their philosophical and cultural stereotypes and judgments. In Chinese culture, the use of body language and nonverbal communication is not a frequent phenomenon. Rather, Chinese speakers are more inclined to use tone and intonation as major indicators of modality.

Chinese music, culture, and food preferences have a long history due to the nation’s strict adherence to ancient traditions. This is of particular concern to Confucianism, the early development of agriculture, and deep interaction with the world of culture. In addition, Chinese food has a deeper symbolic meaning because it is closely associated with Chinese ancient rituals and customs. Chinese music rapidly spread across other cultures due to its refined and complicated nature and, therefore, it has received recognition all over the world.

References

Doctoroff, T. (2011). The China Code. Society. 48, 123-130.

Huai Sheng, Q. (2005). Chinese Traditional Music in Greater Vancouver. Canadian Folk Music, 39(1), 1-5

Li, J., & Hsieh, Y. (2004). Traditional Chinese food technology and cuisine. Asia Pacific Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 13(2), 147-155.

Tsung, L. (2012). Language and power: Tuanjie hua, an Yi-Han mixed language. International Journal Of The Sociology Of Language, 2012(215), 63-77.

Xu, J., Ye, X., & Li, S. (2009). Communication Mode Preference Paradox Among Native Chinese Speakers. Journal Of Social Psychology, 149(1), 125-130.

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