Home > Free Essays > Design > Architecture > Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context

Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context Essay

Exclusively available on IvyPanda Available only on IvyPanda
Updated: Sep 18th, 2022

There are several considerations that must be made before any building is set up. Chandler et al. (2010) state that, “buildings should have links with the neighborhood, create room for several means of transportation and provide diverse different types of houses.” These are some of the key factors that cannot be overlooked while developing a building plan. In this study, we shall focus on Guy’s Hospital building by discussing how people move around it, how they interact with the building, how spaces within the building are used and how it relates to change in the modern world, to understand several considerations that must be made while designing a hospital building.

A Description of Guy’s Hospital Building

Guy’s Hospital is located in South East London (Brown, 1863). According to Brown (1863), “this hospital has the tallest hospital building in the world and the eleventh tallest building in London.” Stuart (1906) notes that “the initial building at the Guy’s Hospital was a courtyard facing St Thomas street, with a hall in the Eastside, care wards, counting houses, a matrons houses, a surgeon’s house and a chapel on the Westside. These were the original parts of the hospital, which are recently used for accommodation and administrative functions (Stuart, 1906). The location of this building concurs with Chandler et al. (2010) argument that a public building should be built at a place that is surrounded by a high population density.

Stuart (1906) notes that, “Guy’s Hospital has nineteen buildings which are inter-connected and are used to offer public medical services, teaching, research, and hostels for learners and that he building is linked to the Thomas Street.” This agrees with Chandler et al. (2010) that, “buildings should have connections with the outer world.”

Okada (2006) notes that “the original building at Guy’s Hospital consisted of two squares with their intervening colonnade which followed the medieval monastic design.” Brigg (1906) notes that “although the hospital has been altered and reconstructed several times, it has retained these three essential features, the front quadrangle, the façade, and the colonnade.” This agrees with Chandler et al. (2010) that, “a building should be designed in a way that is conspicuous to capture attention from a distance.”Okada (2006) notes that, “the original building and the new are well merged showing little difference though constructed at different and that this can be attributed to knowledge and tendency of the Britons to maintain the architectural past.”

How Spaces within the Building are used

Brigg (1906) notes that “the top floors of Guy’s tower are used as a dental school for students of King’s college while the lower floors are used as medical departments.”Stuart (1906) also notes that “the colonnade is made up of grey stone with an arch on top, and with some old lanterns hanging making it to resemble a monastery colonnade and it leads to the medical school.” Brigg (1906) explains that, “you will find learners and their instructors moving to the laboratories for practical sessions and come across several notice boards that carry advertisements concerning conferences in medicine, meetings, and courses as well as general advertisements in this area.” Okada (2006) also notes that “in this area, on each side of the colonnade are located two smaller inner quadrangles which serve as areas for relaxing and this is where you will find the medical school.” Okada (2006) explains that, “the medical school was established formally in 1825, though students were taught in Guy’s Hospital soon after it was opened in the year 1726.” Steel (1865) notes, “Inside the building of the medical school, there exist slim corridors with many bends.”

Next to the medical school is the library. Okada (2006) notes that “this library was established in the year 1903 and the furniture in the library is not modern at all and that up from the library, there lies the Gordon museum.” Okada (2006) notes that “the Gordon Museum was established in the year 1905 and contains pathological specimens which were prepared by Cooper for his lectures.”

Steel (1865) notes that “the ground floor is reserved especially for the weekly reception of in-patients and daily examination of out-patients, and comprises on one side a spacious central hall, with two large waiting rooms to the right and left on the entrance, appropriated respectively for medical and surgical cases.”

Okada (2006) also notes that “there is a big wall in the waiting room which divides the building into different parts and in these parts we have the dispensary, laboratory and observation rooms.” Steel (1865) notes that “the basement projection provides accommodation for medical officers and contains bathrooms, water closets and surgery rooms.”

Steel (1865) notes that, “so as to create a good environment for internal administration, distinct entrance to the street has been put in pace, allowing less interaction with the rest of the hospital during consultation time.” Brigg (1906) also notes that, “ the first, second and third floors which are solely devoted to the treatment of in-patients, are alike in every principle of construction , with an exception in the comparative number of air-channels that respectively lead to and from them.” At the same time Steel (1865) notes that, “every floor has a ward with a dining room that is located centrally.”

Okada (1865) states that, “in the medical department, there is a dining club.” Okada (2006) notes that, “the club has survived the two wars and the enormous social changes of uncertainty and that the Club’s setting is unique.” Okada (2006) explains that, “at the center of the theatre are a wooden operating table with a small chair and a side table.”

Okada (2006) states that, “at the basement of the Southwark wing of Guy’s Hospital building, you will find a restaurant where food is sold and at the Tower wing of the building, there are several cafeterias and this is where most people prefer to buy packed food from.” Okada (2006) also notes that, “in the West wing of the building, there is a bank that caters for people’s financial needs.” Steel (1865) adds that, “there is a department in the building that is assigned to deal with spiritual matters, headed by a chaplain.”

How the Building Relates to the Modern World

One of the ways that the building relates to the modern world is in ventilation. According to Steel (1865), “several novel principals were introduced in the structural arrangement with a view to effect a better system of ventilation that is ordinarily obtained in the hospitals for the sick.”Brigg (1906) notes that, “the hospital was intended to consist of a large central stair case, with wings on either side arranged in a rectilinear form.” Steel (1865) notes that, “the main entrance to the hospital is flanked on each side by a square tower that is one hundred and fifteen feet from the ground surmounted with an octagonal turret.” Steel (1865) explains that, “this was done to enable fresh air flow into the building.” Brown (1863) notes that, “to the rear and abutting on the back of the staircase, there is another tower that has two hundred feet and is surmounted by an octagonal canton and a spine of open iron work.”According to Steel (1865, “this serves to get rid of the air that is not fresh from the wards and other parts of the building.” Steel (1865) also notes that, ”there are five separate floors opening directly from the staircase and the accommodation on the ground floor is supplemented by a projection extending round the front and rear of the edifice, which is used as in connection with the dispensary and out patient departments all of which allows good ventilation.”

Steel (1865) notes that, “all the floors of the Guy’s Hospital building are intersected by a spinal wall which subdivides the ward into four distinct compartment that are close to each other and that these wards are conveniently designed so as to offer good accommodation to patients.” Brigg (1906) notes that “the compartments are sixty nine feet long, fourteen feet high, twenty feet high and the beds are placed so that on one side they are individually made to correspond with the piers betwixt the windows.”Brigg (2006) also notes that, “next to the day room, there is a washroom, ward-scullery on one side and the sister’s room on the other side.” Steel (1865) notes that, “the total cubic contents of a ward, including day-room and communicating passages amounts to 103,740 feet which eases communication between compartments and the central room.” Brigg (1806) notes that, “the upper or fifth floor is reserved as a dormitory for forty nurses.”

According to Steel (1865), “the building is built of bricks, with stone facings and the basement projection, which is faced with rough sandstone is surmounted with an elegant balustrade, enclosing a terraced walk extending along both sides of the hospital and which connects the hospital with the neighborhood.” Brown (1906) notes that, “iron girders and iron joists imbedded in concrete have been used instead of wood, which has been used sparingly in the building.”

Steel (1865) notes that “the spacious staircase, which contributes materially to ventilation is constructed solely of iron and craigleith stone.” Steel (1865) finally notes that, “the entire space under the ground floor has been used to erect the three great towers or air shafts, which give a distinguishing effect to the building.”

Consequently, Brown (1863) states that, “the Guy’s Hospital building relates to the modern world is in terms of its height.” According to Brown (1863), “this hospital has the tallest hospital building in the world and the eleventh tallest building in London.” According to Chandler et al. (2010), “this relates to the modern world in that many people nowadays are resorting to building tall houses due to limitation of space and the need to conserve the environment.”

Finally, the building relates to the modern world in that it is able cater for persons with physical challenges. Guy’s Hospital (1907) notes that “the Guy’s Hospital building is well designed to accommodate people with disabilities.” According to Guy’s Hospital (1907), “there are lavatories in the building that are specifically designed for persons with disabilities and signers that are located at the gate of the Guy’s Hospital building.” These signers are meant to enable the persons with visual impairments to be in a position to move about in the building.

How People Move Around the Building and How People Interact with the Building

Moving around the hospital is easy, because there are large maps at the entrance of the hospital which are well designed to illustrate the different parts of the hospital (Barlow, 1860).These maps are also found in the lifts in the building. The different wings of the Guy’s Hospital building have been have been painted with distinct colors for easier identification. This then makes accessing the hospital very easy and one feels comfortable as he or she walks around the building. One does not have to consult anyone regarding where to get services in the building.

Parking in the hospital is restricted; hence people are encouraged to use public means of transport (Guy’s Hospital, 1907). This does not cause much inconveniences because the hospital is located near a highway, where there are different modes of transportation. This is explained by Chandler et al. (2010) that, “a public building should be constructed near a highway for easier access.”However, Barlow (1860) explains that, “special attention is usually paid to persons with disabilities who come with vehicles as they are exempted from this restriction, and instead are provided with some parking space.” Barlow (1860) also explains that, “the Guy’s Hospital building is well designed to accommodate people with disabilities as there are lavatories in the building that are specifically designed for them.” In addition, there are signers that are located at the main entrance to the hospital and at the gate of the Guy’s Hospital building. These signers are meant to enable the persons with visual impairments to move about the hospital.

The Guy’s building has an arts theatre room whereby people go for entertainments through acting, dancing and other performing arts events (Feltham, 1805). At the basement of the Southwark wing of Guy’s Hospital building, you will also find a restaurant where people go to buy and eat food from. At the Tower wing of the building, there are several cafeterias that are located there. This is where most people buy their foods and drinks from. The building also has several other small shops where people buy snacks from. In the West wing of the building, there is a bank, where people go to withdraw and deposit money. In addition, there is a department in the building that is assigned to deal with spiritual matters, headed by a chaplain. The value of this building has been increased by including all these facilities in the building.

Feltham (1805) notes that, “in the South wing, you will find a knowledge and information centre.” People visit the knowledge and information centre so as to get more information about their health status. Here, you will find technological tools, books, and digitized media that are used to pass to information to visitors and patients in the hospitals about their health status.

Guy’s Hospital (1907) notes that, “at Guy’s building, there is a medi-cinema whereby on-site cinemas in the hospital have been installed.” Guy’s Hospital (2007) explains that, “this cinema is very important for patients as it occupies their mind and draws their thoughts from their ailments to the imaginary world.”

Guy’s Hospital building has several wards. According to Guy’s Hospital (1907), visitors are only allowed to get into the Guy’s Hospital wards in between six hours only in a day. At the same time, only two people at a time are allowed to get into the ward. This is done so as to maintain a calm environment for other patients in the same ward. In cases whereby patients have a viral infection, only one person is allowed in the ward at a time. This is usually done so that the nurses can have adequate room to monitor the situation.

In case one wants to contact a person at the Guy’s Hospital building from outside the hospital, then one has to either ring their bed side phone or to ring to the nursing staff offices so as to be linked with the patient (Guy’s Hospital, 1907). If one has to write a letter, then it is recommended that that the name of the ward is specified (Feltham, 1805).

Visitor’s with infections are not allowed to get into the Guy’s Hospital building, unless under supervision of the nurse in charge of the ward. Washing hands is highly encouraged at the hospital so as to prevent infections; hence at the front of every ward, there is a dispenser for washing hand (Feltham, 1805). Other times, patients with infections are separated from the rest in the ward to avoid the risk of further spreading the infection.

According to Guy’s Hospital (1907), “people who visit Guy’s Hospital and want accommodation are usually accommodated at the Counting House lodge, in the colonnade.” However, Guy’s Hospital (1907) explains that, “for one to be accommodated, prior booking must have been done.” Guy’s Hospital (1907) also notes that, “on the second floor of Guy’s Hospital building, there are bedrooms, washrooms, digitalized televisions and cafeterias that offer food.” On the other hand, Handler (1976) states that, “the bathrooms have been located along the corridor for exclusive use by the guests though each room contains a hand basin.”

According to Guy’s Hospital (1907), “people around the Guy’s Hospital building are not allowed to smoke from anywhere hence there are specified places in the building that are used as smoking zones.” Handler (1976) explains that people who have minor injuries are usually treated by nurses at the ground floor of Guy’s Hospital building. Handler (1976) also notes that, “people are never allowed to get into the building with expensive items such as expensive phones and jewelry due to the fact that it is a public building.” Guy’s Hospital (1907) explains that, “there are receptionists at the entrance of the hospital who welcome people to the hospital and direct them on where to find services that they are seeking.” At the same time, Handler (1976) states that, “on getting to the wards in Guy’s Hospital building, one is usually briefed more about the stay.”

Handler (1976) notes that, “upon admission in the ward at Guy’s building, one is expected to share the sleeping room and washrooms with members of the same sex.” Guy’s Hospital (1907) states that, “the ward normally has a cupboard whereby one can store personal effects and that entertainment is also available in the wards, though at a cost.”

It is very normal for one inside the Guy’s Hospital building to encounter students. This is because the medical school is also situated in the Guy’s building. These students at times also, accompanied by their instructors do visit the wards for lessons.

In conclusion, Guy’s Hospital is a unique hospital, both in terms of its architectural look and the activities that take place in the hospital building. According to Brown (1863), “this hospital has the tallest hospital building in the world and the eleventh tallest building in London.” Steel (1865) notes explain that, “spaces within the building have been used for different purposes.” On the other hand, Brigg (1906) notes that, “the top floors of Guy’s tower are used as a dental school for students of King’s college while the lower floors are used as medical departments.” According to Feltham (1805), “there are rooms in both the dental school and the medical department that are used as restaurants, shops, theatre halls and cafeterias.” Moving around the hospital is easy, because there are large maps at the entrance of the hospital which are well designed to illustrate the different parts of the hospital building. However, there are rules governing movement in the hospital buildings like visitation hours and the presence of infections. People also interact with the building through the various facilities that are offered in the building.

References

Barlow, G.H. (1860). Guy’s Hospital reports. London: Harvard University.

Brigg, J. (1906). Guys Hospital: history and building. California: University of California.

Brown, J. H. (1863).Guy’s Hospital reports: London: Harvard University.

Chandler, R., Clancy, J., Goody, J., Dixon, D. & Wooding, G. (2010).Strategies for creating a community through urban design. London: John Wiley & Sons.

Feltham, J. (1805).The picture of London, for 1802. London: Oxford University Press.

Guy’s Hospital (1907). Reports volume 61. California: University of California.

Handler, C.E. (1976). Guy’s Hospital 250 years. London: University of Michigan.

Okada, A. (2006). Keats and English Romanticism in Japan. New York: Thomson Learning.

Steel, J.C. (1865). Guy’s Hospital reports. London: Oxford University Press.

Stuart, M. C. (1906). Hospitals in London. London: John Wiley & Sons.

This essay on Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.
Removal Request
If you are the copyright owner of this paper and no longer wish to have your work published on IvyPanda.
Request the removal

Need a custom Essay sample written from scratch by
professional specifically for you?

801 certified writers online

Cite This paper
Select a referencing style:

Reference

IvyPanda. (2022, September 18). Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context. https://ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/

Reference

IvyPanda. (2022, September 18). Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context. Retrieved from https://ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/

Work Cited

"Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context." IvyPanda, 18 Sept. 2022, ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/.

1. IvyPanda. "Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context." September 18, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/.


Bibliography


IvyPanda. "Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context." September 18, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/.

References

IvyPanda. 2022. "Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context." September 18, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/guys-hospital-building-and-its-context/.

References

IvyPanda. (2022) 'Guy’s Hospital Building and Its Context'. 18 September.

Powered by CiteTotal, automatic citation generator
More related papers